Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Using PING


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
8 replies to this topic

#1 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:05 AM

Posted 18 August 2014 - 03:02 PM


Basically PING is one method to check YOUR CONNECTIONS.  However, there are people that may have a misunderstanding on what happens when it is used, and how to use it.  You basically have three ways to ping, manually.

1,  PING 127.0.0.1 (actually any "127" address).  This never leaves your computer, and doesn't even get to your home network, or to the Internet.  In another post, I showed this is true

2.  PING your modem.  This checks your connection up to your modem, but not out to the Internet.  Pinging any 127 address doesn't reach your modem.  To PING your modem, you must use the IP address shown in the Default Gateway entry, when you do an IPCONFIG /ALL or IPCONFIG.

3.  PING sites on the Internet.  This is how you check your connection past your modem and out to the Internet.  TRACERT is another option.

Here small sampling of the output of a program I wrote, to that sits in the tray and checks my connection continually:

8/18/2014 8:32:23 AM Tried (interlotto.com, ip: 213.175.202.232); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:32:23 AM Tried (google-public-dns-a.google.com, ip: 8.8.8.8); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:32:23 AM Tried (google-public-dns-b.google.com, ip: 8.8.4.4); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:32:53 AM Tried (user.netomia.com, ip: 69.172.201.208); Successful?: False
8/18/2014 8:32:53 AM Tried (google-public-dns-a.google.com, ip: 8.8.8.8); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:32:53 AM Tried (google-public-dns-b.google.com, ip: 8.8.4.4); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:23 AM Tried (yarn-store.com, ip: 98.139.135.199); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:23 AM Tried (google-public-dns-a.google.com, ip: 8.8.8.8); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:23 AM Tried (google-public-dns-b.google.com, ip: 8.8.4.4); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:53 AM Tried (bbc.co.uk, ip: 212.58.244.20); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:53 AM Tried (google-public-dns-a.google.com, ip: 8.8.8.8); Successful?: True
8/18/2014 8:33:53 AM Tried (google-public-dns-b.google.com, ip: 8.8.4.4); Successful?: True


In summary:

1.  Pinging 127 addresses never leave your computer, so to check Internet connectivity.
2.  Pinging 127 addresses never reach your modem.
3.  To check your connection to the modem, you need to ping (or tracert) the default gateway.
4.  To check your connection past the modem, you need to ping (or tracert) to a site on the Internet.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,324 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:07:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 08:58 AM

scotty_ncc1701 is confusing the use of modem with router.  While these two devices can be the same, they can also be different.

 

Your router is your gateway.  The router, routes traffic off of your local area network (LAN) to another network.  The other network may be another LAN or the Internet.

 

A basic test of your network connectivity can be performed by:

 

REM Ping Local Host
PING 127.0.0.1
REM Ping Gateway
PING 192.168.1.1
REM Ping Public IP address
Ping 24.84.100.101
REM Ping an Internet IP address (Google DNS)
Ping 8.8.8.8
REM Ping an Internet server (www.google.com)
Ping www.google.com

 

Pinging Local Host, 127.0.0.1, or any 127.x.x.x address, will let you know if there is a problem with your TCP/IP stack, the software behind your TCP/IP connections.

 

Pinging your Gateway, this can be found by running IPCONFIG from a command prompt and looking for the Default Gateway, 192.168.1.1 is only used as an example your gateway may be different, will let you know if the issue is between your device and the router.

 

Pinging your Public IP address, this can be found by going to What Is My IP.com, will let you know if your router is routing your LAN traffic to the Internet.  Your Public IP address may change, depending on how your ISP handles public addresses.  The address provided is only an example, and not mine.

 

Pinging 8.8.8.8 (Google DNS) will let you know if your ISP is routing traffic.  If this is not working you will need to contact your ISP to have them check into the issue.  I recommend resetting your modem and router before you call as this can clear many issues.

 

Pinging www.google.com will let you know if domain name system (DNS) resolution is working properly.  This is not normally an issue you will have.  You can try changing your DNS server as it may be down.  Normally there are at least two DNS servers and if one stops working the second one will fulfill DNS requests.



#3 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 11:48 AM

The default gateway will show the address of the modem, regardless whether it is a standard modem (one person using it, directly connected to it), or a router/modem combo (same unit).  My comments stand as accurate.

============
This proves it.
============
Wireless turned off in Windows, old modem (no router, direct connect from computer to modem, via Enthernet cable, no wireless ability).  See, there is a "Default Gateway".
============
Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : Home

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : domain.invalid
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::48fb:9603:b2bb:1217%3
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.1
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.254
============
Wireless turned on, router/modem active, no Enthernet cable.  See, there is a "Default Gateway".
============
Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : Home
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::1877:51d6:2bd6:903e%4
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.2
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.254

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : domain.invalid
============
My comments still stand about the default gateway, whether is it is a standard modem, with no router; or a router/modem combo (same unit).

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:
 



#4 Wand3r3r

Wand3r3r

  • Members
  • 2,027 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 12:19 PM

Not quite.

 

What you are calling a modem is a router.  How can I tell?  By the provided ip address range.  Its private ip not public ip.  A true modem will provide a public ip from the ISP.  Only when NAT is taking place do we have public translated to private ip which is what you have for the gateway at 192.168.254.254



#5 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 03:01 PM

Not quite.

 

What you are calling a modem is a router.  How can I tell?  By the provided ip address range.  Its private ip not public ip.  A true modem will provide a public ip from the ISP.  Only when NAT is taking place do we have public translated to private ip which is what you have for the gateway at 192.168.254.254

You're mistaken!  I know what a modem, a router, and a router/modem combo is.  There are router/modem combos, maybe you're not aware of that.  So how I described things are accurate.

Device #1 (MODEM):  One Ethernet Port (to one PC), no wireless ability, one physical outgoing connection to the Internet.  In other words a MODEM only.

Device #2 (ROUTER/MODEM combo):  Four Ethernet Ports (to four PCs), wireless ability, one physical outgoing connection to the Internet.  In other words a ROUTER/MODEM combo.

Until a few years ago, when we had a lighting strike, I had a MODEM connected to an external ROUTER.  Now I have a ROUTER/MODEM combo.

Regardless of which one was connected (straight MODEM or ROUTER/MODEM combo), the "Default Gateway" was shown as the IP address of the MODEM (single port to one PC) or ROUTER/MODEM (multiple PCs and wireless).

I also know what a private/public IP address is.

My comments stand as accurate.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:



#6 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,324 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:07:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 04:27 PM

The problem is you did not specify a modem/router.  You called it a modem.  A modem modulates and demodulates.  A cable modem is actually a bridge.  A cable modem allows your router or computer to get an IP address.  Even if your modem has a built in router you are pinging the router, not the modem.

 

It is very important to use the correct terms when attempting to explain something to someone else otherwise they might want to Mambo dogface to the banana patch and no one else will know what they are talking about.

 

scotty_ncc1701 you seem to not understand how your equipment is functioning.

 

Device #1 (MODEM):  One Ethernet Port (to one PC), no wireless ability, one physical outgoing connection to the Internet.  In other words a MODEM only.

 

Without seeing your modem/router I would suspect that it has more than one ethernet port.  By connecting directly to one of the ethernet ports you are not connecting directly to the modem, you are still going through the router.  The device would have to be set in bridge mode in order for the test to be valid.  The main key to this is the fact that you have a private IP address.  Those addresses cannot be routed on the public Internet.

 

Your gateway has absolutely nothing to do with your modem.  Your gateway is the address of the router.  If I connect my PC directly to my cable modem my gateway will be a router on the Comcast network as the modem is only a bridge.  A bridge is used to connect two different networks.



#7 Wand3r3r

Wand3r3r

  • Members
  • 2,027 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 05:09 PM

"There are router/modem combos, maybe you're not aware of that. "

 

:-)  I have been in IT for over 20 years.  Back then there were no home [soho] routers or modem/router combo units.  So yes I am aware of all the different router types past and present. There was no internet when I started [well there was but not as you know it today].  We had dialup and BBS to logon to for download/upload files.

 

Bet you never heard of a brouter either :-)  That's because they were short lived.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_router



#8 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 05:45 PM

20 years?  Not impressed.  Let's try almost 40 years... 20 years military, 20 years civilian, as an operator, developer, systems administrator, technical support and DBA.

No disrespect, but I've tired of this conversation.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:
 



#9 Queen-Evie

Queen-Evie

    Official Bleepin' G.R.I.T.S. (and proud of it)


  • Staff Emeritus
  • 16,485 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:My own little corner of the universe (somewhere in Alabama). It's OK, they know me here
  • Local time:07:05 AM

Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:36 PM

20 years?  Not impressed.  Let's try almost 40 years... 20 years military, 20 years civilian, as an operator, developer, systems administrator, technical support and DBA.

No disrespect, but I've tired of this conversation.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:
 

 

And on that note this topic is closed before it turns into a free-for-all fighting match and an ego trip.


Edited by Queen-Evie, 19 August 2014 - 06:36 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users