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Linux Mint and file structure


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5 replies to this topic

#1 j_bins

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:11 PM

Hi,

 

This is probably very obvious but I am trying to work out where new programs are installed when using Linux Mint. Here is a picture of my Hard Drive Configuration:

 

https://flic.kr/p/oL1yCm

 

I know I have:

  • Root - 12Gb
  • Home - 13Gb
  • Swap  - 1.6Gb
  • XP - 30Gb
  • Dell Restore
  • Dell Utility - (not really sure what that is?)

 

Am I right in thinking that 'Home' is where all my docs are stored and 'Root' is where the OS and new programs are located? How do you access the Root to view the contents?

 

Thanks for your patience,

 

:)



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 03:49 PM

Am I right in thinking that 'Home' is where all my docs are stored and 'Root' is where the OS and new programs are located?

Yes, unless you save your documents to another partition, the way you describe would be correct.

You should be able to access root to view the contents using the File Manager (although I don't recall what File Manager Mint uses).

Or, you can do it through a terminal. Open a terminal and type ''cd /'' (without quotes) and hit enter, and you will be in root. (cd stands for change directory)

Then type ''ls'' (without quotes) to view the contents of root, or ''ls -a'' to view the contents including any hidden files and folders. (ls means list, and a means all) To navigate to any directory in root, type ''cd'' followed by the name of the directory, so for example ''cd Home'' will take you to the Home directory, and once there you can type ''ls'' or ''ls -a'' to view the contents of the home directory, and so on.

Edited by Al1000, 18 August 2014 - 03:53 PM.


#3 sflatechguy

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 09:55 PM

Unless you changed the default directory for new programs, standard convention on most Linux distributions is to place your new programs in the /usr directory, although some may be placed in the /opt directory if there is one. Both are located directly under the root directory, /.

The /usr directory will have a /bin subdirectory, which is where the binaries to run those programs would be stored.



#4 pcpunk

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:22 PM

Just go to "Home Folder" in the "Menu" then "File System" and there you go all that you need except perhaps for hidden files.


Edited by pcpunk, 21 August 2014 - 10:03 PM.

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#5 jonuk76

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 07:54 PM

"Where the programs were" was something that confused the hell out of me at first.  This might help (it's probably dated slightly, but most of it still applies) - http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/09/linux-file-system-structure/

 

It's not a good idea to go manually altering things in the root file system unless you know what you're doing.  To add and remove programs you generally use a package manager, something Windows doesn't really have.  In Linux Mint you have the Mint software centre which is the most user friendly, but more advanced users might prefer to use Synaptic or the command line based APT.

 

Program settings are often held in a hidden directory in the users home folder.  These are kind of equivalent of the hidden AppData folder in users folders in modern Windows.  Hidden directories in Linux start with a . (dot).  For example, the files that hold your profile data and downloaded e-mails in Thunderbird would (IIRC) be held in the /home/your_name/.mozilla/Thunderbird directory.

 

Something else that confused me at first is the concept in Unix-like systems of mounting.  Drive letters as a concept do not exist in Linux.  Basically storage devices (or more precisely, partitions on these devices) have to be mounted at a location in the file system, in order to be accessed. In the distributions I've used that auto-mount removeable drives, normally these devices are mounted in the /media folder.  Try plugging in a flash drive or USB HDD and have a look at the /media folder in the root directory.  You should be able to see the disc mounted there as a folder, and be able to browse the content of the drive (and knowing where they are mounted is essential if you want or need to access files on them using the terminal).  More on this at the Ubuntu site (which also applies to Mint).


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#6 j_bins

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 12:21 PM

Thanks for the replies :) I really appreciate it.

 

I think I am begining to get my head around it.

 

thanks for the geekstuff link jonuk76 - will bookmark that.

 

J






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