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#1 Mr.Glass

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 07:31 AM

Hey Guys, 

 

I posted earlier on this forum about upgrading my processor from a i5-750 to something a little more beefy. But just recently one of my buddys told me that he would buy my old system from me for a fair price. So i've come to the conclusion that I am going to be buying a new and pretty big/new system.

 

My price range at the moment is around 1,100 USD, but if need be I can spend a little extra. Here his the rig that I have come up with so far.

 

CPU - Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor

 

CPU Cooler - Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler

 

Motherboard - ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard

 

Memory - G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory

 

Storage - Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive

 

Video Card - EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Superclocked ACX Video Card

 

Case - Azza Solano 1000R ATX Full Tower Case

 

PSU - Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply

 

Optical Drive - Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer

 

Operating System - Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit)

 

Grand Total = $1164.87

 

So if there are any cheap upgrades I can make to this buy to make it a little more powerful, please let me know! Thanks in advance to those that reply!

 

Respectfully,

Mr.Glass



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#2 Zerue

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 02:49 PM

Hey Guys, 

 

I posted earlier on this forum about upgrading my processor from a i5-750 to something a little more beefy. But just recently one of my buddys told me that he would buy my old system from me for a fair price. So i've come to the conclusion that I am going to be buying a new and pretty big/new system.

 

My price range at the moment is around 1,100 USD, but if need be I can spend a little extra. Here his the rig that I have come up with so far.

 

CPU - Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor

 

CPU Cooler - Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler

 

Motherboard - ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard

 

Memory - G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory

 

Storage - Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive

 

Video Card - EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Superclocked ACX Video Card

 

Case - Azza Solano 1000R ATX Full Tower Case

 

PSU - Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply

 

Optical Drive - Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer

 

Operating System - Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit)

 

Grand Total = $1164.87

 

So if there are any cheap upgrades I can make to this buy to make it a little more powerful, please let me know! Thanks in advance to those that reply!

 

Respectfully,

Mr.Glass

 

First, the cpu could be swapped with the new I5-4690k. It is a haswell refresh so it will perform a bit better.  

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117372

 

cpu cooler : the EVO is the best bang for your buck however, it may be a little bit noisy. You can go with a Dark rock pro 3 by BeQuiet! which would be a lot quieter but would cost a bit more. But if you don't mind the noise then the EVO would do fine (great actually)

http://www.ncix.com/detail/be-quiet-dark-rock-pro-72-93616.htm

 

motherboard: If you are going with the 4690k, you may want to find a compatible z97 board LGA1150 socket , i would recommend a gigabyte gaming 3 which supports overclocking and is actually assigned for gamer use. But pretty much any MSI, Gigabyte or ASUS brand would do a solid job. 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128711 

 

Memory : if you can get those sticks, great. If not, you can pick other 1600 ddr3 ram because meh, ram is ram. I use a Corsair vengeance (corsair fanboy, sorry).

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233144

 

Storage : If i were you i would go with a wd caviar black instead just for little bit more performance there as well. 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136284

 

Video Card : please, do not get the 770. Unless this is your personal preference or you have any discounts or freebies this is not an option (well for me). An R9 280x would be cheaper (based on you location) and has a higher ram (3gb vs 770's 2gb). However if you have a specific game that you would want to play, you can go check for benchmarks whether an R9 280x would perform less than a GTX 770, which I doubt would happen by the way... 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150678

 

Case : Take your pick! just make sure it has a decent airflow, would fit your parts and would be enough for your future upgrade. I use a Corsair 300r in my build because.. It works and it doesnt hurt the budget :)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139011

 

PSU : again take your pick, just make sure that is has at LEAST an 80 plus bronze certification. Corsair make great PSUs and Im actually using an RM 650. It is 60 Plus Gold by the way. I chose this because it is just damn too quiet. The fans will even stop moving if you are not using much load (less noise, less power.. win - win)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139054

 

Optical Drive and OS : whatever floats your boat.

 

Oh if I may add, if you want to dramatically increase the performance of your build, you may want to invest on an SSD even a small capacity one. Samsung EVO is the way to go for me but you can also go get a Crucial MX100.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147247

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148820

 

And to the mods, sorry for posting the links, its my first time here. I dont have any affiliations with the respective sites. Cheers.


Edited by Zerue, 14 August 2014 - 03:00 PM.

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#3 DJBPace07

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 06:58 AM

That's not a bad PC at all.

 

Motherboard and CPU:  I would suggest getting an i7 if this is a gaming PC, due to increased performance.  I suggest the Intel Core i7-4770 Haswell Quad-Core 3.4GHz LGA 1150 and GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H LGA 1150 Intel Z97 motherboard.  Both of these are newer models with the motherboard using the higher-end Z97 chipset.  Gigabyte is a good brand to get, as is Asus, but be careful of ASRock.  They aren't bad per se, but their boards tend to be a little thin.

 

RAM:  Be careful, sometimes, the RAM with the tall heatsinks don't clear the CPU fan.  The Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 would be a good alternate.

 

GPU:  The needed VRAM amount varies based on what you are going to be doing.  If you use super sample anti aliasing, EyeFinity, 4K gaming, or multiple monitors, get a card with more than 2GB of VRAM, if you are aren't, 2GB should be enough.  The R9 280X and GTX 770 are very similar in terms of performance, either card would do well.  The GTX 770 does use less power.

 

Case:  A full tower ATX case has plenty of room and space to work in.  I always prefer the larger cases for this reason.

 

I echo the previous poster on the SSD, the performance is great.  I also like Windows starting quickly with an SSD.


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#4 Zerue

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 08:54 AM

 

That's not a bad PC at all.

 

Motherboard and CPU:  I would suggest getting an i7 if this is a gaming PC, due to increased performance.  I suggest the Intel Core i7-4770 Haswell Quad-Core 3.4GHz LGA 1150 and GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H LGA 1150 Intel Z97 motherboard.  Both of these are newer models with the motherboard using the higher-end Z97 chipset.  Gigabyte is a good brand to get, as is Asus, but be careful of ASRock.  They aren't bad per se, but their boards tend to be a little thin.

 

RAM:  Be careful, sometimes, the RAM with the tall heatsinks don't clear the CPU fan.  The Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 would be a good alternate.

 

GPU:  The needed VRAM amount varies based on what you are going to be doing.  If you use super sample anti aliasing, EyeFinity, 4K gaming, or multiple monitors, get a card with more than 2GB of VRAM, if you are aren't, 2GB should be enough.  The R9 280X and GTX 770 are very similar in terms of performance, either card would do well.  The GTX 770 does use less power.

 

Case:  A full tower ATX case has plenty of room and space to work in.  I always prefer the larger cases for this reason.

 

I echo the previous poster on the SSD, the performance is great.  I also like Windows starting quickly with an SSD.

 

Hi DJBpace07

 

If you won't mind I would like to ask for your opinion on this.

 

1. The I7-4770 Haswell uses a.. lets just say, not the best TIM between the IHS and the silicon, making it really hot under load. Intel addressed this on their Haswell refresh, the Devil's canyon (4790). Same architecture but with better TIM this time, so why not pick a 4790? 

 

2. I assumed the OP will be overclocking based on his Motherboard pick and the addition of a CPU Cooler, also the difference between an unlocked and non unlocked haswell is around 5-10 bucks (depending on location) so why not pick an unlock CPU (4770k)?

 

3. If he would indeed go with a locked CPU (4770) and a single GPU, why suggest a z97 board? he could save much more if he would go with an H87 one.

 

4. Assuming the OP would mostly be gaming and a little bit of rendering/video editing, IMO an I5-4790k would be more than enough. I would only recommend an I7 if you do a lot of video editing and rendering as it cost a lot more.

 

I may be wrong so please feel free to disagree :)

 

-------------

To OP

RAM : Corsair vengeance uses a large heatsink so consider that when picking that one as the previous poster said.

 

Also i would like to add that a GTX 770 uses less power but also tend to overclock less than a 280x. Conversely the 280x uses a little bit more power but overclocks really well and is cheaper. I think this is a no brainer :)

 

Case. I agree again with the previous poster, Full atx case is a breeze to work in, however if you are not planning on adding an additional GPU, this is not optimal for me as it will cost more. Also you may need to use an additional fan for airflow.

 

Cheers!


Edited by Zerue, 15 August 2014 - 08:54 AM.

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#5 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 08:46 AM

IHS - Integrated Heat Spreader

TIM - Thermal Interface Material

 

1. I was aiming more for cost-effectiveness with a performance processor, hence the reason as to why I chose a non-K CPU.  The OP also did not mention overclocking, so I did not aim for an easily OC'd motherboard and CPU.  The Intel Core i7-4790 is only marginally more expensive and would also be good.  The "K" version is about $15 more.  I haven't seen anything about the TIM on the CPU going bad, then again, it may take time for it to go bad.

 

2.  Usually, high-end performance motherboards have the highest quality.  A quality board may be capable of overclocking, but it isn't required.  Personally, I go for quality boards (I use an Asus Sabertooth 990FX) not for overclocking, but for quality.  Customers may also get an aftermarket cooler for other reasons other than overclocking, perhaps they want a quieter, more efficient cooler.  This is why I got an aftermarket cooler, AMD's cooler is loud and not that good for a hot FX processor.

 

3.  There are differences between a Z97 and H97 board.  The Z97 boards typically skew towards performance, they are easier to OC on and, if multiple GPU's are used, the Z97's have native support for SLI/Crossfire.  Here's a short article on some of the differences.  The main difference between Intel's 8 series chipset and the 9 series is the M.2 support.

 

4.  For me, if I were gaming and planned to keep the computer for five or more years with only minor upgrades, the i7 would be a great choice for having performance for most of those five years.  This is the mindset I go into when it comes to upgrades.


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#6 Zerue

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:07 AM

IHS - Integrated Heat Spreader

TIM - Thermal Interface Material

 

1. I was aiming more for cost-effectiveness with a performance processor, hence the reason as to why I chose a non-K CPU.  The OP also did not mention overclocking, so I did not aim for an easily OC'd motherboard and CPU.  The Intel Core i7-4790 is only marginally more expensive and would also be good.  The "K" version is about $15 more.  I haven't seen anything about the TIM on the CPU going bad, then again, it may take time for it to go bad.

 

2.  Usually, high-end performance motherboards have the highest quality.  A quality board may be capable of overclocking, but it isn't required.  Personally, I go for quality boards (I use an Asus Sabertooth 990FX) not for overclocking, but for quality.  Customers may also get an aftermarket cooler for other reasons other than overclocking, perhaps they want a quieter, more efficient cooler.  This is why I got an aftermarket cooler, AMD's cooler is loud and not that good for a hot FX processor.

 

3.  There are differences between a Z97 and H97 board.  The Z97 boards typically skew towards performance, they are easier to OC on and, if multiple GPU's are used, the Z97's have native support for SLI/Crossfire.  Here's a short article on some of the differences.  The main difference between Intel's 8 series chipset and the 9 series is the M.2 support.

 

4.  For me, if I were gaming and planned to keep the computer for five or more years with only minor upgrades, the i7 would be a great choice for having performance for most of those five years.  This is the mindset I go into when it comes to upgrades.

 

1. Actually, im talking about the TIM being bad already (sorry Intel), and not about going bad along the way. That is why tutorials on how to delid the Haswells and replacing its TIM have spread out like mad after it's release. And you did suggest an OC Motherboard.

 

 

That's not a bad PC at all.

 

Motherboard and CPU:  I would suggest getting an i7 if this is a gaming PC, due to increased performance.  I suggest the Intel Core i7-4770 Haswell Quad-Core 3.4GHz LGA 1150 and GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H LGA 1150 Intel Z97 motherboard.  Both of these are newer models with the motherboard using the higher-end Z97 chipset.  Gigabyte is a good brand to get, as is Asus, but be careful of ASRock.  They aren't bad per se, but their boards tend to be a little thin.

 

 

2. Agreed, OC is not required, I just made an assumption based on OP's part selection, like I said earlier.

 

However, again, if OP is not overclocking, replacing Intel's stock cooler with a CM 212 EVO for quieter more efficient solution is a bit questionable for me as CM 212 EVO tends to be loud under full load. Not to mention that you would be spending extra bucks when a stock cooler would do the job, hence hurting the cost efficiency that you have pointed out earlier. 

 

3. Sorry for the typo, i meant h97.

 

I just suggested an H97 based on your CPU recommendation, like I said, with a locked CPU (4770)  and a single GPU, the z97 gives no advantage whatsoever since there will be no OC and SLI/Crossfire involved, again not cost efficient.

 

4. You can last for 5 years gaming with an I5 with no issues. You can even game on a overclocked G3258 or an APU with no problems, however that analogy breaks when the OP will need to do heavily threaded programs. Dont get me wrong, doing heavily threaded programs on an I5 is possible but not as fast as an I7. Bottomline is, unless the OP plans on using Adobe Aftereffects or Davinci Resolve everyday and will mostly be gaming, OP cannot take advantage of the hyperthreading in I7 as most games is not yet optimized for extra cores on a CPU (BF4 excluded).

 

I respect your preference. However your solution (on my opinion) is a bit aimed towards performance, to a point that you reached the point of diminishing returns. I'm not saying your recommendations are bad, they are good, just too pricey for a guy on a budget. 

 

Sorry if i sound harsh, I meant no disrespect. :)


Edited by Zerue, 18 August 2014 - 11:03 AM.

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#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:41 AM

WHAT DID YOU SAY?!?!

 

Just kidding, no offense taken!

 

I aim long term with my upgrades, right to the point where diminishing returns start but don't go much past it.  I'm also looking at doing an upgrade later this year or next depending on other expenses.  I was thinking of doing it around the release of Windows 9, that way I can mostly start all over with a mostly clean system.  Given the release of the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, we may start to see more games utilizing four or more cores, or, at least have native x64 executables become more widespread.

 

I had no idea TIM issues were happening with Intel.  They did update the material for the most recent CPU release.  There's a lot of info on delidding the Intel CPU's.  I'm used to hot CPU's, I use an AMD FX.


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