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Computer shuts down after CPU replacement


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#1 GalenAltaiir

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:04 AM

Hello there, I hope that's correct section xD

 

I have recently bought new CPU for my computer and replaced it. Short while after booting the PC, it just randomly shuts down for no reason. And I have no idea what might be causing it.

 

I have been replacing Intel Core 2 Duo E4400 for Intel Pentium D945.3.

 

I'll attach some computer specifications. My guess would simply be that the fan isn't strong enough to cool the CPU and therefore it's overclocking causing the computer to shut down, however I prefer to ask some help on forums before buying or changing anything without any sort of assurance.

 

Attached File  Untitled.jpg   51.79KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  Untitled.jpg   26.81KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  Untitled.jpg   29.51KB   1 downloads



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 11:05 AM

Just to clarify this, you replaced the Pentium D 945 (old) with the E4400 (new)?  The Core 2 Duo E4400 is cooler running than a Pentium D and uses less power.  But did you clean up the heatsink and use new thermal compound when changing them over?  If not, that might be the problem.

 

The motherboard supports the E4400 (and Pentium D 945) from BIOS version F5, which is what you have currently, so it should work.

 

If possible, could you publish a report using Speccy which will give more information about your system, and post the link to the report in your reply?

 

Thanks


Edited by jonuk76, 10 August 2014 - 11:06 AM.

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#3 GalenAltaiir

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 11:47 AM

Ah. No I haven't used new thermal compound when changing them, I thought that might have been the issue since it could cause the processor to overheat or something like that, I'll try that as soon as I can. And here's report in case there's something else to it. http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Z55DH4BxTUaud6TtITFMGcs

Thanks for help



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 12:45 PM

Yes pretty sure that is the problem.  Your Speccy report shows the CPU idling at 1200mhz at 70 degrees.  A few years ago I was using an E6300 overclocked to 3 Ghz (from 1.86 Ghz stock) with just a cheap aftermarket air cooler, an Arctic Freezer 7 Pro. Even overclocked to that degree, it would report idle core temps around 25-30 degrees, only rising to about 50 degrees under heavy load for long periods.  They were really cool running chips.  70 at idle is much too hot.

 

If you have the room for it, the cooler I mentioned is good for the money for a Core 2 Duo system.  At the very least, you'll need to refit the stock cooler with some thermal compound.  Arctic MX4 is decent stuff.  Remove the cooler, and clean out any dust from between the fins.  Then using a solvent like acetone or isopropyl alcohol clean all the old compound from both the CPU and the base of the cooler.   Then apply a small amount (approximately rice grain size) blob of thermal paste to the centre of the CPU heatspreader and fit the cooler.  The pressure from mounting the cooler squishes the compound to where it's needed.  Make sure all the push pins are clipped into place securely.  This alone should drop your CPU temperature by a significant amount.

 

Your case and hard drive temperatures as a whole look a bit on the high side (not worryingly so, but higher than I like).  It might be an idea to have a good clean out of any dust that might be blocking air intakes, cleaning dust from fan blades and so on.  An air duster is good for cleaning hard to reach places.


Edited by jonuk76, 10 August 2014 - 12:47 PM.

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#5 GalenAltaiir

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 01:39 PM

No luck sadly, I have applied the thermal compound onto the CPU and then put everything in one piece, and still nothing, computer doesn't even make a single beep sounds, it just runs, freezes, and turns off again

 

 

on a side note, I used E1 IC Essential, is this one good enough or  should I really just go for Arctic MX4?


Edited by GalenAltaiir, 11 August 2014 - 03:16 PM.


#6 jonuk76

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 03:16 PM

Erm that doesn't sound good.  Just to clarity, are you saying it doesn't even POST (power on self test) now?  Or is it loading up Windows and then freezing as it was before?  If the latter, what are your temperatures now?


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#7 jonuk76

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 03:35 PM


on a side note, I used E1 IC Essential, is this one good enough or  should I really just go for Arctic MX4?

 

MX4 is a favourite amongst enthusiasts, and it's also quite cheap, but TBH, as long as *something* thermally conductive is used and it's applied correctly (not too much, not too little) I think it should be good enough.  Some people buy expensive stuff like material containing powdered diamond, and even liquid metal (based on gallium).  To me these seem more trouble than they are worth..

 

Believe it or not, some review sites (example) have conducted tests including ridiculous items for a "thermal paste" (stuff like tooth paste, jam, peanut butter....) and unbelievably I think most of them outperformed using nothing, although obviously it was just for fun purposes.  You really don't want to use tooth paste as a long term solution :)


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#8 GalenAltaiir

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 03:50 PM

Erm that doesn't sound good.  Just to clarity, are you saying it doesn't even POST (power on self test) now?  Or is it loading up Windows and then freezing as it was before?  If the latter, what are your temperatures now?

 

Actually I'm not sure, since for some reason it didn't want to detect my monitor cable? The screen was just black but that might be fault of a cable, I had that happening before, but from what it sounds like, basically what happens the computer boots, sounds like there is something going inside, but it sort of freezes there, the lamp next to power button just freezes still on, meaning, like I said, computer doesn't respond. There might be fault on software side this time, today I'm too tired to mess with this, so I'll try again tomorrow, I might've also not used enough paste but I'm not sure. I'll give it a shot tomorrow but if you have any ideas or anything pops into your head just let me know.

 

 

 


on a side note, I used E1 IC Essential, is this one good enough or  should I really just go for Arctic MX4?

 

MX4 is a favourite amongst enthusiasts, and it's also quite cheap, but TBH, as long as *something* thermally conductive is used and it's applied correctly (not too much, not too little) I think it should be good enough.  Some people buy expensive stuff like material containing powdered diamond, and even liquid metal (based on gallium).  To me these seem more trouble than they are worth..

 

Believe it or not, some review sites (example) have conducted tests including ridiculous items for a "thermal paste" (stuff like tooth paste, jam, peanut butter....) and unbelievably I think most of them outperformed using nothing, although obviously it was just for fun purposes.  You really don't want to use tooth paste as a long term solution :)

 

 

Yeah that's true xD Although, it's quite smart idea for crisis when computer is at highest temperature :P



#9 GalenAltaiir

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 12:53 PM

Problem Solved! Yes, it was my fault, I didn't apply enough compound, now everything works fine. Thanks for help!

 

 

...Is there a solve button or something? xD


Edited by GalenAltaiir, 12 August 2014 - 12:54 PM.


#10 jonuk76

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 04:22 PM

That's excellent news. Happy to help :)


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