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Can't log on to my domain


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#1 Bucshots

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 09:24 AM

I'm running into an issue where my laptop is being assigned an APIPA address. I've updated the drivers for the network card, but I'm clueless as to what else I can do to resolve this problem. Should I take it off the domain, is there something I need to add to the domain controller? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 



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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 10:32 AM

Not getting a ip address has nothing to do with being in a domain.  It does indicate your dhcp server is either not talking/unreachable or there is a physical issue preventing the dialog between the two.

Is your dhcp server running on the server or on the router?



#3 Bucshots

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 10:35 AM

On a server... 



#4 Bucshots

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 10:42 AM

I should mention that was able to connect successfully with a different laptop, but exact same model.



#5 sflatechguy

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 11:58 AM

Can you ping the computer's loopback address (127.0.0.1)? Can you ping the computer's IP address from that same computer -- in this case, 169.254.x.x? If you can't, you have issues with the TCP/IP configuration on that computer.

 

When you connected the other laptop, did you use the same Ethernet cable and wall connector (if there is one)?

 

When you open the Network and Sharing Center, does the connection type show as Home, Work or Public? Change it to Work if it's not set that way now.

Is the netlogin service enabled or disabled? Enable it if it is disabled, and make sure it's set to Automatic.

 

If those don't work, you could try this:

Change the network type to workgroup, do an ipconfig /release, and disconnect it from the network.

Remove the computer from the Computers OU.

Remove the computer from DNS if it's there. Remove the DHCP lease if it's still there.

Rename the PC, reboot it.

Plug it back into the network, add the computer to the domain, reboot it again.



#6 Bucshots

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:43 PM

Thanks sfla.. I'll try what you recommended. I am using the same ethernet cable and it was already set to work in NSC. 



#7 Wand3r3r

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 03:18 PM

I would consider that a bit of overkill for simply getting apipa ip address.  Those are all much high level things to do if you couldn't logon to the domain.  We are at a much lower level.  For example I would request a post of a ipconfig /all from the problem device.  A simple tcp/ip setting may be needed to correct the issue.



#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 03:33 PM

That's why I recommended trying the low-level things first -- check the cable, ping the loopback address, ping the computer's IP address from the computer itself, check the TCP/IP configuration on the computer.

 

If those are all in working order, then it's a domain issue, because we know DHCP is set up and working for the domain -- that's why the other laptop was able to connect. The computer will have to be rejoined to the domain. It does happen sometimes, and when it does, you basically have to create a new profile in Active Directory Computers OU for the computer.



#9 Wand3r3r

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 04:06 PM

"because we know DHCP is set up and working for the domain"

 

:-)  maybe and maybe not.  I would want to see what the scope had been set to as well as a ipconfig /all from the laptop that connected, one from the server itself and one from the laptop that did not connect. I would then move on to the device that did not connect firewall configuration as this is a known issue.

 

Even if the device was not a part of the domain it would still get a ip address from the dhcp server residing on the server.



#10 sflatechguy

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 04:19 PM

The ability to obtain a lease may also depend on what filters are set for allowed devices in DHCP. Allowing anyone to obtain a lease simply because they are plugged into the network is a major security hole, and DHCP servers can be set to filter based on MAC addresses, or via Network Access Protection.






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