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Startup error: The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessib


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#1 JubicleJam

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 01:27 AM

I was in the middle of backing up my failing hard drive to a brand spankin' new internal drive when my computer completely froze on me. I restarted and received this error:

 

0xc000000f: The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible 

 

I've already gone into the bios and made sure it was booting on the right drive, and it was. I've switched to every possible boot device and they all give me the same error message. I've also ran the windows installation disc and performed a startup repair multiple times to no avail. I've even checked for loose cables but everything seems fine, and even if my old hard drive has finally failed, it still won't boot on the new one either.

 

I've also ran 'bcdedit' in the command prompt and it showed that it was booting on the correct drive. so I'm really just at a loss here.

I've been having non-stop computer problems for about 2 weeks and I really just want it to stop. (not to mention now I'm really concerned I've lost all my files for good)

 

Anyone have any suggestions?

 

(by the way, I'm really not the most tech savvy person, so try explaining your solutions like you're talking to a small child)

 


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#2 nencywillims

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 05:08 AM

You can use a repair disc. To get a repair disc, find someone with Windows 7 32 bit and Create a Windows 7 System Repair Disc — MAXIMUMpcguides – Windows 7 tips, tricks, help, and how-to guides.

Edited by Orange Blossom, 08 August 2014 - 04:13 PM.
Link removed. ~ OB


#3 JubicleJam

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 05:40 AM

Thanks for the reply but, isn't a repair disc just an alternative to if you don't have a windows installation disc? doesn't it give me the exact same options?



#4 Orange Blossom

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:14 PM

Hello JubicleJam,
 
I believe what you'll need to do is to put in a new hard-drive, then slave the old hard-drive to the PC to remove the data from it.  The less you try to use the old drive, the better the chances for getting the data off it.  That said, I don't know how to do this myself.  I'm going to ask some others to assist.

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#5 Ste2ph

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 05:25 PM

Thanks for the reply but, isn't a repair disc just an alternative to if you don't have a windows installation disc? doesn't it give me the exact same options?

A repair disc is specifically for repairing the Windows 7 I believe. Because there was times I used a Windows Installation Disc to do a repair and it didnt work but a Start Up disk Did. If you believe you might have Hard Drive failure, which what im thinking but id like to know more info, then you should consider getting an External USB Hard Drive Enclosure (Which goes for about 10$ on walmart.com) and Clone you current HD to a new one with cloning software like Nortons Ghost or Clonezilla just to make an Exact copy of your computer. And I sent you a link for the Repair Disc



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 05:29 PM

Ok, you have a nice shiny new hard drive and one that is failing / failed. As Orange Blossom has said, stop using the old drive ASAP. For the time being, just disconnect its power and data leads.

 

You say you have a Windows - presumably Win 7 - installation disc. Use this to install Windows on your new drive. There should be no problem activating Windows on this HDD because MS regard a new HDD as a repair. Depending on how old this install disc is, you may be looking at a considerable number of updates, plus you will need to re-install all your applications. Do this before you worry about the data on your old HDD.

 

Once you have the computer up and running the way you want it, then you can worry about your data, and the way I do it is this :

 

Turn off the computer and connect the power lead to the old HDD, then boot. Once the computer is up and running, connect the data lead, then go into Windows Explorer and see if you can see the disc. If you can, you should be able to copy your data from the old HDD to the new one. Allow yourself an uninterrupted hour or so for this task as your old HDD may not take kindly to being switched on and off - I would just leave the computer running until you have all the data your want / need off it.

 

(No doubt there are those who may disagree with my method - if so, feel free to say so. In my defence, I have never blown a hard drive up yet doing it this way.)

 

What will happen is that by installing Windows on your new drive, this will become your C:\ drive, and your old drive will be assigned a different drive letter, even though there is an OS on it.

 

Hopefully, this will enable you to recover your data, and will have demonstrated the importance of doing data back-ups. If you have any problems or questions, post back.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 Ste2ph

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 12:49 AM

@Chris Cosgrove Well its not just about copying his files. What if he wants to continue to use the same programs? Then a data transfer from an old OS to a new one isnt the answer. He should clone his HD before its too late.


Edited by Ste2ph, 09 August 2014 - 12:49 AM.


#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 04:58 PM

I have no wish to start an argument on the best way to proceed.

 

If the computer was booting from the old drive then I would agree, clone it and use the clone to re-install on the new one. This is likely to be easier than installing afresh, and certainly it would be quicker. But according to the OP, it is not booting from this drive.

 

Therefore I suggest that Orange Blossom's opinion and my advice stand.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#9 Ste2ph

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 07:30 PM

Ive had trouble with HD's that wouldnt boot but it would still read as a secondary HD whether internal or USB. So if he would copy his data from the old HD he might as well clone it and keep everything as it was. 






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