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Sm. Business Network from Hell (not really)


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#1 drwmbt

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 04:26 PM

Hey guys,

 

my friend runs a small print business and he is having network problems. I know how to setup networks from scratch fairly well, when all hardware and systems are setup correctly its a by-the-book situation.

 

But he has thrown all sorts of printing hardware and windows computers in the mix on a private 192.168.1.x address range, so I can only assume that each windows computer is assigning itself an ip thru its own DHCP service while I know for a fact the printers and scanners are static ip's.

 

To top it off he has no router just the cable modem (biz class ISP) with a switch plugged into it and that has a port (lets just say its the last port #8 for the sake of the discussion [Switch A]) attached to a cable with a smaller 4 port switch (also full [Switch B]) attached to it.

 

My main reason for posting this thread is to get him setup on a public 10.1.1.x address range

 

Here are the devices:

 

-Dell Tower (XP) [Switch A]

-Dell Tower (Vista) [Switch A]

-Dell Tower (Win 7) [Switch A]

-Dell Tower (Win 8) [Switch A]

-Dell Tower (Win 8 next to HP Latex Printer) [Switch A]

 

-Cable Modem (4 port)

-Netgear(?) Switch (8 port) (Connected to modem)

-Generic Switch (4 or 5 port) [Switch A]

 

-Konica Copier [Switch B]

-Konica Copier's EFI Fiery (NIC) [Switch B]

-Konica Color Printer [Switch B]

-Konica Color Printer EFI Fiery (NIC) [Switch B]

-OCE Lg. Format Printer [Controller]

-OCE Lg. Format Scanner [Controller]

-OCE Controller (Dell tower) [Switch A]

-HP Latex Printer [Switch A]

 

I may be leaving some out here but im also going to try and draw a topography map for you guys to make it easier to distinguish.

 

I am seeking help getting them converted over to a 10.1.1.x range so that they are able to communicate with the internet.

 

I believe their cable ISP only allows one static ip address.

 

I'll need to get the administrative passwords to all the printers/scanners/copiers/controllers to get them changed over to static ip's.

 

Last time I tried to do this, I tried to change the modem over to a static range in the admin settings of the modem itself, but I really think this guy HAS to get a router before any of that will be possible. (likely needs a small Linux server as well to do DHCP and SMB and CUPS as well)

 

Any small biz network gurus out there setting up similarly sized networks have any tips? especially any who have jumped into someone elses mess and successfully changed them over to a 10.1.1.x network, is the router REQUIRED stuff here? it seems like the modem was able to be told to take the 10.1.1.x address range but it wouldn't "server" the ip's out to the rest of the machines, im sure this is where the server and DHCP come in at though.

 

 

Sorry for the large and primitive picture but here is the network topology (and for added effect of chaos I drew it as it appears on the floor >:]~)

 

mm6j42.jpg


Edited by drwmbt, 05 August 2014 - 04:48 PM.


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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 04:49 PM

There is no different between a 192.168.x.x and a 10.x.x.x network other than the available number of IP addresses, they are both Private Networks.  He needs a router, end of story.  There is no need to change from a 192.168.x.x to a 10.x.x.x network.



#3 drwmbt

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:03 PM

ok, and what about the computers assigning themselves random ip address's? when you try to setup FTP and SMB for the copiers/scanners it never wants to communicate over the network. I just thought this was another side effect of the 192.168.1.x range



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:25 PM

If you only have one public IP address you're only going to have issues having more than one device serving a service.  Something has to be performing as a DHCP server, unless the machines are coming up with 169.254.x.x addresses.  The device that is acting as a DHCP server needs to be set to give the printers, scanners, and copiers the same address every time, also known as a DHCP reservation.  Setting a static IP on the device is okay, but making the change on the DHCP server is a better method and you don't need the admin passwords to do it.

 

I think you need to get a better understanding of how everything is configured.  What currently can communicate with the Internet?


Edited by Kilroy, 05 August 2014 - 05:28 PM.


#5 drwmbt

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:41 PM

im pretty sure the modem is acting as DHCP server because all dell pc's can access the internet but of course are given the same public IP address thru I assume NAT



#6 zingo156

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:42 PM

From the diagram it looks like the modem is going to switch "a"


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#7 Kilroy

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:59 PM

If the modem is acting as the router.  You need to either find out if you can modify how the modem handles the network, or put the modem in bridge mode and install a router that you control.



#8 Wand3r3r

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 01:05 PM

Since modems don't do dhcp we have to assume this "modem" is really a router.  That being the case there is no reason you have to put it in bridge mode and get your own router unless you want to add wifi to the network.

 

"ok, and what about the computers assigning themselves random ip address's?"

 

depends on what you mean by "random".  If a 169* ip address it means the workstation didn't hear back from the dhcp server.  if by random you mean another 192x ip address that would be normal for dhcp.

 

"while I know for a fact the printers and scanners are static ip's."

You would want to review the dhcp server's ip range [scope] to make sure its range does not include this block of static assigned ip addresses.

Your ip plan should look something like this

 

192.1681.1 to 192.168.1.254

reserved ips for static [router/printers, etc] assignments = 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.25

dynamic ip [dhcp scope] = 192.168.1.50 to 192.168.1.100

 

.26 to .49 available to grow the static scope

101 to 254 available to grow the dynamic scope

 

You don't need a Linux server since dhcp will be handled by the modem/router






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