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Unmounting, Ejecting Drives and Partitions


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#1 pcpunk

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 04:48 PM

I did a search but apparently I am not good at it lol omg.  What is the proper way to close out of my pc as Drives and Partitions are concerned.  

 

I notice that there is an option to "Eject" a USB and there is the option to "Unmount" a "Partition" are these the proper way to "Quit"

 

I have also just "Quit" when these are "Mounted" (I think is the proper term) but this would not seem to be the safest way to Quit/shutdown pc as these options are there for a reason? 


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 05:19 PM

I always UnMount ( Eject) USB drives before unplugging them, Windows users should also do this it prevents damage to the files. One reason some USB drives turn RAW is because the drive was not ejected correctly.

 

With fixed drives SATA, IDE I have never bothered. 

 

And as for the drive I boot from? Can you unmount a drive used to boot the OS from?


Edited by NickAu1, 04 August 2014 - 05:30 PM.


#3 pcpunk

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 07:55 PM

I always UnMount ( Eject) USB drives before unplugging them, Windows users should also do this it prevents damage to the files. One reason some USB drives turn RAW is because the drive was not ejected correctly.

 

With fixed drives SATA, IDE I have never bothered. 

 

And as for the drive I boot from? Can you unmount a drive used to boot the OS from?

I am clear on the Eject when pc is in use, Unmount is not an option for USB's though at least in my situation.  What about when shutting down/Quiting, does this have to be done then?  Can I just shut down and then pull out the usb? this seems sufficient to me.  

 

So with my Windows partition if I had been using it, it shows up on desktop, you are saying that this would not be an issue?

 

I don't understand the last comment.


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#4 NickAu

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 02:34 AM

Sorry for late reply.

 

To understand how to mount unmount Drives and files, Including usb please read this post.

Just because you see a drive/partition in the file system or on your desktop don't mean its mounted, It only becomes mounted when you click the icon and a window with the contents of that drive opens on your screen.

 

 

 

Author: DarkRaika
Category: Linux | Read 94,708 times | Last Modified on March 27, 2014
A filesystem is a way that an operating system organizes files on a disk. These filesystems come in many different flavors depending on your specific needs. For Windows, you have the NTFS, FAT, FAT16, or FAT32 filesystems. For Macintosh, you have the HFS filesystem and for Linux you have more filesystems than we can list in this tutorial. One of the great things about Linux is that you have the ability to access data stored on many different file systems, even if these filesystems are from other operating systems.
 




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