Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Raid 1 To Raid 0+1 Or Raid 10


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Bazanaius

Bazanaius

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:51 PM

Posted 02 June 2006 - 06:38 AM

Hey guys, first of all, let me load my specs....

AMD 4000+
2GB RAM
Asus A8N-SLI Deluxe - http://uk.asus.com/products4.aspx?l1=3&l2=...375&modelmenu=1
256mb Leadtek 6800GT
2x Maxtor SATA 160gb drives in RAID 1 configuration on the NVIDIA RAID controller.


I am coming to the limit on my 160gb RAID 1 array, and so have ordered 2 more 160gb drives due to arrive next friday. They are seagate SATA II drives.

There are two RAID controllers on my motherboard, an NVIDIA one and a Silicon Image one.
NVIDIA - RAID 0, 1, 0+1 and JBOD
Sil. Img - RAID 0, 1, 10 and 5

My question is, what is the best way to set up my drives with the least hassle and to give me 320gb with the mirroring protection still in place.

As far as I can see, I have three options...

1) Switch to RAID 0+1 on the NVIDIA controller, giving me mirrored striping
2) Switch to RAID 10 on the SI controller, which is apparently safer but more difficult to rebuild (can anyone explain how this is different from 0+1?)
3) Switch to RAID 5 on the SI controller - I havnt got a clue how this works!

I have the added complexity that I need to keep the data on my current array as part of the new array, so basically I'd like to add the two new drives to my array whilst keeping my data alive on the other two, leaving me with what appears to be one big disk C:.

It therefore seems to me that 0+1 would be best, as changing controller is asking for trouble? what do people think? And I know this is cheeky but could someone give me a step by step guide for how to do this as I found setting up the original array quite complicated and I really dont want to lose my data!

any thoughts would be great, thanks in advance!

Baz

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Albert Frankenstein

Albert Frankenstein

  • Members
  • 2,707 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Michigan, USA
  • Local time:04:51 PM

Posted 02 June 2006 - 07:42 AM

Wow you have several questions. Let me take a stab at 'em!
Here is what you said your options are:

1) Switch to RAID 0+1 on the NVIDIA controller, giving me mirrored striping


This will give you 320 GB of storage in a striped set. And it will give you a back up set of hard drives that will contain the exact same data. This is good at protecting your data from a hard drive failure.


Switch to RAID 10 on the SI controller, which is apparently safer but more difficult to rebuild (can anyone explain how this is different from 0+1?)

Not exactly the same thing.

Switch to RAID 5 on the SI controller - I havnt got a clue how this works!

This will also protect your data from a hard drive failure. As I recall, in a RAID 5 array it is similar to striping, but the pieces of data are put on more than one hard drive. Then if one hard drive fails, the data pieces that were on the failed hard drive can still be recovered from the other hard drives.

Personally I don't see a big advantage to this for you over RAID 10.

Think of this: If you have a striped array how will you recover in the event of a motherboard failure? Do you have a spare, exact model motherboard? Run through the scenario of how you will recover from this. You may be very vulnerable to a motherboard failure, and are risking losing everything. Mobo manufacturers change their mobos all the time. If yours fails next year, you might not be able to get an exact replacement. What you will have is a bunch of hard drives, all with little bits and pieces of data, but nothing complete, meaning all is lost.

This is why RAID 1 is probably best for the average home user. In the event of a hardware failure you can just take one hard drive and plug it into any computer and get your stuff!

Can you configure your computer with two RAID 1 arrays? If so, just make your 2 new hard drives a different partition, and you will have a full copy of that partition in the even of a hard drive failure. Does that make sense?

BTW, there is a great web site HERE that might shed some more light on this.

Edited by Albert Frankenstein, 02 June 2006 - 11:15 AM.

ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
I'M SO SMART IT'S SCARY!


Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!


#3 Bazanaius

Bazanaius
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:51 PM

Posted 02 June 2006 - 08:28 AM

hey albert, thanks for the quick reply - that website is really useful!

So basically thoughts are... just keep my current RAID 1 array, and simply add another (so I get two drives appearing in my computer). I guess that makes sense... put programs, OS and other replaceable things on one array and other data (e.g. music, files videos etc.) on the other.

Hang on, as one array contains only stuff that I can replace (software which I have copies of), is there anything to stop me setting up my drives as....

1x160gb containing OS and replaceable stuff
2x160gb in a RAID 1 for important stuff
1x160gb for other stuff (not entirely sure what - any suggestions?)

this would give me 480gb! wow! not sure whether this is worth it tho... any thoughts?

#4 Albert Frankenstein

Albert Frankenstein

  • Members
  • 2,707 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Michigan, USA
  • Local time:04:51 PM

Posted 02 June 2006 - 11:13 AM

Of course. That would work.

You could even have all 4 drives independant of each other, each being it's own partition. Or you could partition each one even further, although most peeps don't need that many partitions. Usually it is like you said, one for the OS and one for the data. Although I have seen another for downloads. That way if you download something bad hopefully the rest of your system is protected.

Just to clarify. If you download something you put it in the 'download' partition, then scan it for virus, etc. If clean then you can move it or install it to the other partitions.

Just a thought.

Good luck!

Edited by Albert Frankenstein, 02 June 2006 - 11:16 AM.

ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
I'M SO SMART IT'S SCARY!


Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users