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Pc Cooling Help


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10 replies to this topic

#1 wemibelec90

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 03:14 PM

My computer is constantly overheating. It seems like it shuts down at least once a day. I am running a Athlon 64 3000+ processor, a GeForce 6800, and 1 GB of RAM. My PCU fan is pretty good and I have a fan running in the front pulling in air and in the back pushing out air. Unfortunately, my case doesn't support anymore fans.

I was just wondering if anyone has any tips to help prevent this from happening. I would really prefer a low cost solution as I am out of money for a month or so. Also, I have taken the side panel off in hopes that that will keep it cooler. Will taking the side off help or not?

Thanks for the help!

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#2 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:28 PM

Have you cleaned the inside of the case recently?

Open the case.

Get a can of compressed air and carefully blow the dust from the processor fan and all other fans. Hold the fans from spinning with a non-metallic object like a pencil as overspinning the fans will ruin them.

Is the system overclocked?

#3 JPHarvey

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:54 PM

Taking the sides off will help, but the downside (especially if you have a domestic fan blowing in) is that you get a lot more dust in there.

Another option is to self install an 80mm fan in the side of the case (removable panel) - it is pretty easy to do - directly over the processor fan. You can get a little more air that way.

I have fairly high ambient temps in the room my PC is in, and found that the stock cooler was not sufficient - I replaced it with an SI-120 Thermalright cooler and 120mm fan. Never go back!

The other option is to simply purchase some aftermarket thermal paste (you can get them at most PC shops) and clean the existing thermal paste from your CPU. That way when you put the CPU Cooler back on, you know it will be seated properly and teh thermal paste is fresh.

I recommend Panaflo fans - they seem to have high flow rates and low noise....

Hoep that helps :thumbsup:
[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
[MoBo]ASUS P5N32-SLI Premium (nForce590)
[RAM]4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800 CL4 @ 710MHz
[GPU]XFX 8800 GTX 768MB [SLI] @ Stock
[PSU]CoolerMaster 1kW
[Audio]ASUS Xonar D2
[Case]Antec Nine Hundred
[OS]Windows Vista Ultimate 64
[LCD]SAMSUNG 226BW
[Other]WC'd CPU & SLI

#4 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 06:21 PM

I suggested that the side be taken off to clean the inside of the PC, not to leave it off, but the fact is any extra dust that might get in at this point can be cleaned before the panel is replaced after we get the problem resolved.
The additional cooling potential at this point would be preferential in my opinion.

If you decide to replace the thermal paste, get some of the best quality (Artic Silver maybe) and be extremely, extremely careful and thorough in cleaning the old paste from both the processor and heat sink and replacing it exactly as per the instructions of the processor manufacturer.

Doing so incorrectly will cause the destruction of the processor as soon as you turn the power on. Personally, I would not mess with it unless it was the last possibility, which at this point it is not.

At this point we do not even know if it is a thermal shutdown.

Download Everest Home Edition V1.51(the last full featured freeware version) at oldversion.com. It will be in the utilities section.

Install it, open it, and see what it tells you about the fan speeds and temps.
Click the "+" to the left of "Computer" in the left pane and then click "Sensor" i the tree that will open.

What are the temps for the motherboard and the cpu?

What speed does it say the fans are running at?

#5 wemibelec90

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 06:31 PM

Here are the temp ratings:

Motherboard: 124 F
CPU: 133 F
Fan Speed: 2250 RPM

By the way, my computer is only a couple of months old so I don't need to replace the paste. The fans are also a day old and do not need to be cleaned.

#6 JPHarvey

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 06:45 PM

OK, well that doesn't seem like its overheating...I believe the max for your CPU is 70C (158F).

What is happening when it shuts down, and what do you mean by shut down - does it lock, or reboot, or just go completely off?
[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
[MoBo]ASUS P5N32-SLI Premium (nForce590)
[RAM]4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800 CL4 @ 710MHz
[GPU]XFX 8800 GTX 768MB [SLI] @ Stock
[PSU]CoolerMaster 1kW
[Audio]ASUS Xonar D2
[Case]Antec Nine Hundred
[OS]Windows Vista Ultimate 64
[LCD]SAMSUNG 226BW
[Other]WC'd CPU & SLI

#7 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 07:00 PM

Is this a computer that was commercially built and still under warranty?

Here is what AMD support says about the temps.
The fan speed looks normal, although we don't know which fan is hooked up to the "System Fan" pin on the MB.

What is the maximum operating temperature for my AMD processor?
The maximum operating temperature of an AMD processor is determined by the processor's Ordering Part Number (OPN). The OPN is located on the top of the processor.
Example: A X1800 D M S 3 C
The temperature is indicated by the third character from the right in the OPN and is denoted by an S, T or V character. Current data for the AMD AthlonTM XP processor identifies the maximum operating temperature as: V=85C, T= 90C, S = 95C.

The cpu temp also looks ok as 133F is about 55C, and even though the measurement of the mb's sensors are approximate, it shows nowhere near the high temp point.

What size power supply do you have installed and how does it compare to what the following link says you need?

Power Supply Calculator
http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/

#8 wemibelec90

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 10:55 PM

My computer completely shuts down. It goes black and the power light goes off. I also have to wait a few seconds to turn it back on.

My computer was built by me and all the parts are still under warranty.

My power supply is a 450 W and the calculator says the minimum I need is 256 Watts.

Thanks for all the concern, everyone!

#9 HitSquad

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 12:07 PM

Mainboard temperature is way too high. Shouldn't be much more then 10-15 degrees fahrenheit above ambient temperature with proper cooling. Check your cabling and get it out of the way of airflow.
Round cables are the only way to go for IDE's.
If you want to cut in an extra fan, use a 120mm on the top as exhaust, heat rises.
CPU temp, if tested at idle, is also a tad warm but probably due to the above.
CPU Fan speed is a little lower then I would prefer myself, I'd change it out unless you have a manual controller and can kick it up a bit.

#10 The Shadow

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 02:34 PM

I've got enough heat generators in my PC that's it's a virtual OVEN.
I knew this was going to be the case the day I built it three years ago.
I just didn't put the left side panel on. In fact, I'm not sure where the right side panel is either. :thumbsup:

With that side panel OFF, I can see and hear my cooling fans and when they start catching dust, I clean them.

One of the greatest heat generators in the whole PC is the 7200rpm hard drives (x2).
You can cook your lunch on one that's working hard and not being properly cooled.

I'm kind of a developemental Engineer and I worked for a while and wasted some money on the HD heating problem before I came up with a workable solution.

Here's what I finally came up with.

The little brass standoffs are absolutely mandatory for proper air flow.

Now with the little coolers properly installed on both of my HD's, the drives and the whole inside of my PC stay at room temperature.

My AMD 3000+ CPU (slightly overclocked) is adaquately cooled by the OEM cooler that came with it. It does, however, get a thorough cleaning and oiling about three to four times a year.

The success of proper PC operation depends on "Maintenance".

I just took a little Compaq desktop computer in on trade. The CPU heat sink is completely packed with dirt.
It's going to get removed and washed. That's the only way to really get it clean. The little fan will be carefully cleaned by hand and re-lubricated before reinstalling.

Every week someone posts a thread like this one on one forum or another.
AMD processors that are properly installed and cooled, just never overheat. Period.
I just now laid my finger on my own CPU heatsink and it's only slightly warm to the touch.

Good Luck and Happy Computing,
The Shadow :flowers:

Edited by The Shadow, 02 June 2006 - 03:00 PM.

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#11 Enthusiast

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 03:27 AM

There are cooling fans available for the Hdds, and fairly cheaply.
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/ca...c.asp?CatId=495

I agree with HitSquad on the round cables and the system fan.

After a bit of thought:
Even with a system wide open, airflow which is supposed to be drawn by the fans over the components may not be, and open sides may not enable accomplishment of that. Airflow may be left stagnant where you need it the most.

Look at some of the cooling options on the tigerdirect page for ideas.

I wouldn't mess with the cpu though. Taking it apart could expose you to problems.




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