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Is it possible to add a dialup modem dialer to newer versions of Linux?


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#1 brian2009

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 12:30 AM

I've finally got some new distros on DVD for some pretty cool looking versions of Linux-64 bit. (Mint 17, Ubuntu 14, and Zorin 9..all newest versions as of yesterday).

 

The problem is, I am geographically limited to dial-up unless I travel to a hot spot. (which I'm used to doing from time to time). But I'd still like to use one of these slick versions at home using dial-up for internet access.

 

It's just too late here to justify trying to find an answer on-line so I thought I'd just ask.

 

I noticed that at least Mint had a process to add a ppp dialer...but you needed to be on-line to get it. Is this something I might be at least able to download while at a hot spot...or possibly download it using my dial-up friendly Puppy and somehow get it into the Mint installation?

 

I'd be willing to get all three newer distros set up for dial-up, but I just wondered if it's even possible (before I waste 3-4 hours trying to see if it can be done).

 

Thanks.


Edited by brian2009, 29 July 2014 - 12:32 AM.


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#2 1PW

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:33 AM

Hello brian2009:

 

Fow years I ran a few Linux distros of the day with a "Linux modem" (U.S. Robotics USR5610B). Software based Winmodems of the day could not be made to work with Linux then.

 

You really need to "do your homework" and obtain the modem, with drivers, compatible with the distro you settle on.

 

Please begin at http://www.linmodems.org/ and keep going.


All viruses are malware but not all malware are viruses and if the malware doesn't self replicate it just isn't a virus.


#3 brian2009

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:17 AM

I understand your point, but if these newer distros cannot be set up to even use a dial up modem there's no point in proceeding to find the right modem.

 

I'm asking if there is a way to have the 'Network' option include a dialer for dial-up modems.

 

It looked like Zorin has one but I couldn't get it set up properly. I'll keep trying.



#4 technonymous

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 03:36 PM

Some info on it from Ubuntu. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DialupModemHowto/Modems As the documentation states, it's easier to setup an external USrobotics modem that uses a DB25/DB9 Serial cable. Search around places like Goodwill donation centers etc usually you find a couple of them laying around. You could try calling around some local computer shops and see if they got one collecting dust in the bone yard.


Edited by technonymous, 30 July 2014 - 03:36 PM.


#5 brian2009

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 05:28 PM

In the 3 newer distros I've run (see above) on Live DVD there seem to be a few programs that look like they can be obtained from the repositories. I am assuming programs containing "PPP" in their name is what I might want to try (such as KPPP for one, or wvdial).

 

But I won't be able to try to obtain them until I can connect to a wifi with these new distros (new to me) in the next couple days.

 

I just wondered if anyone has added a ppp type program to these newer distros. I imagine the easiest way to see if it worked would be if the "Network" button would include an entry for Dial-Up among the various network connection types that drop down as they are pre-packaged in the distros.

 

Thanks


Edited by brian2009, 30 July 2014 - 05:29 PM.


#6 bmike1

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 04:16 PM

I used wvdial long ago. If it is in the repository it will work. I had to buy a USRobotics modem to get online. I got a card.... not the external.


A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.





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