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Wireless Problems


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#1 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 02:18 PM

Hi

I would very much like some help with a problem that has prevented me from using the home desktop PC to access the internet for almost 2 months now. The PC Windows XP Home (SP 2).

I bought a Belkin Wireless Router (F5D7230-4-) and Belkin Wirless G USB adaptor (F5D7050uk). I know the router is working fine because my laptop has no problems accessing the internet (and it has been replaced by Belkin) using its own internal wireless card. But whenever I try to access the internet using the desktop PC that requires the USB adaptor I can't get online.

The wireless adaptor picks up the signal from the router, I can see the name of the router on 'available wireless networks'. It says that it is connected to the wireless router and that the signal strength is good. When I do ipconfig and ping it even manages to send a message to the router and back again. I have spent hours on the phone to Belkin's call centre in Bangalore, spoken to countless people with English names that are clearly not there own, and once heard the whistle of a train in the background.

Belkin's technical people have completely run out of ideas and now can only suggest that I 'contact my local technical support person'.

I have tried the following:
Turning off all firewall, anti-virus and spyware software.
Turning off all security and encryption on the router.
Connecting directly to the router using Belkins' specific IP, subnet, DNS addresses
Upgrading the driver for the USB adaptor
Resetting the Wireless Zero Configuration
Uninstalling and reinstalling the Belkin software (and SP2)
Installing a Microsoft fix for SP2 relating to connectivity problems
Resetting browser configurations
Using different browsers.

Any suggestions about how to get around this problem would be really appreciated

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#2 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 02:33 PM

Try using the USB adaptor (F5D7050uk) on your laptop, choosing the connection for it instead of the internal connection, and see if it works.

If it does, we will know that the problem must reside in the desktop and we can go from there.

#3 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 03:21 PM

Try using the USB adaptor (F5D7050uk) on your laptop, choosing the connection for it instead of the internal connection, and see if it works.

If it does, we will know that the problem must reside in the desktop and we can go from there.


Hi

Thanks for the quick reply.

OK, so I installed the USB software on my laptop, disabled the internal card and used the Belink USB adaptor to access the internet with no problems.

This would indicate that the USB adaptor is working and that the problem lies with the desktop PC.

#4 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 03:29 PM

Yes it does.

Ok -

Put the adapter back on the desktop.

Go to the control panel and click on the Wireless Network Wizard.

Make sure the settings you input in Setup a New Wireless Network match the way the router is set to recieve, e.g. Wep or not, security or not.

Make sure the network name exactly matches the way your laptop is set, and then go back into the Wireless Network Wizard, choose "Add computers of devices" and then print out your network settings so you can make sure that both computers and the router are set properly and exactly the same.

Let me know

Edited by Enthusiast, 01 June 2006 - 03:32 PM.


#5 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 03:57 PM

Hi

Right, both connections appear to be identical.

Network name (SSID), Network Key (none) Network Authrntication (open)
Data encryption (Disabled).

And still under Network Connection it says Connected

But still no internet access.

#6 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:05 PM

How about email?

#7 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:11 PM

MS Outlook 2003 cannot connect either

#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:16 PM

Go to the control panel again, click on "Network Connections"

Then click on the "New Connection Wizard"

When it opens click "Next"

Tic the radio button for "Connect to the Internet"

Follow it through.

#9 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:21 PM

Yup

Been through that process, and gone as far as it goes without any success

#10 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:41 PM

Connect the cable or dsl modem directly to the desktop instead of going through the router.

Reboot the modem and the computer.

If not working:

Go back to the control panel and open Network Connections

Right click on the lan connection

Is tcp/ip checked?
What else is checked?

Click the authentication tab
is Enable Ieee 802.1x authentication for this network checked?

If you had to check either one, reboot the computer again.

If that doesn't work you may have to call your ISP and have them walk you through the settings they need to connect.

Edited by Enthusiast, 01 June 2006 - 04:43 PM.


#11 FlatEarth

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:51 PM

This is made more complex by the fact that the desktop PC has no ethernet socket. So it cannot be connected directly to the cable modem.

But TCP/IP is checked as well as AEGIS, QoS, File and Printer Sharing and Client.

Enable IEEE 802.1x is not checked.

I have been in touch with the ISP who have sent an engineer round to look at the cable modem, but he could find no problem.

#12 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:14 PM

There isn't anything wrong with either the modem or the router.
If there was the laptop wouldn't work.

The problem lies in your computer.

Did you tic the radio dial for Ieee 802.1x authentication?

Does your ISP have any proprietary software that had to be installed in your laptop to get it connected?

One more thing to try - what firewall are you using on the desktop?

How is the desktop connected to the router. in other words, what does the adapter plug in to- USB?

Edited by Enthusiast, 01 June 2006 - 05:18 PM.


#13 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:20 PM

Open the device manager - look and see if there are any yellow or red warning icons on the usb hubs or ports?

If there are, delete anything with a warning icon on it and reboot, letting windows find and reinstall them.

How many usb ports do you have? And, are they all USB2?

#14 Enthusiast

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:32 PM

Using Internet Gateway Device Discovery and Control If your home network has an Internet gateway device, you can use Internet Gateway Device Discovery and Control (IGDDC) to monitor and configure the deviceís Internet connection from any computer connected to your home network and running Windows.

IGDDC works with residential gateways, Wi-Fi wireless base stations, and computers configured for Internet Connection Sharing (ICS).

The Internet gateway device icon
If your home network has an Internet gateway device, IGDDC adds an Internet gateway device icon to the Network Connections folder or the Communications program group, depending on which version of Windows your computer is running. The icon displays the name and status of the Internet connection on your device, and controls to configure the device.

When an Internet gateway device is discovered, the icon automatically appears on your computer. In Windows XP, the icon appears in the Network Connections folder, under Internet Gateway. On computers running Windows 98 and Windows Millennium Edition, an icon appears in the Communications program group and in the taskbar.

If the icon does not appear on your computer, make sure that:

Your computer is physically connected to the network.
You have a good wireless signal (to view signal strength, right-click the wireless networking icon in the taskbar).
Your Internet gateway device or the computer that connects directly to the Internet (the ICS host computer) is configured correctly and is connected to the network.
If Windows Firewall is enabled, the UPnP framework ports are open. For more information, see Enable UPnP network functionality. (see below)

If you tried the steps above and the icon still does not appear, you can try repairing your computerís network connection. Repairing the connection forces it to create the icon on your computer. For more information, see Force a network adapter to acquire an IP address.

If the shared Internet connection is disconnected, double-clicking the Internet gateway device icon dials the Internet connection. If the shared Internet connection is connected, double-clicking the icon opens the status window, where you can view connection status and statistics or disable the shared Internet connection. You can also right-click the shared Internet connection icon of an active connection to view the Properties page, where you can select the Show icon in the notification area when connected check box or open the status window. If the connection is disabled, you can view the Properties page or enable the shared Internet connection by right-clicking the shared Internet connection icon. Enabling or disabling the shared Internet connection from any single computer, enables or disables the connection for the entire network.

The following table lists the types of information that are available in the status window on computers using IGDDC.

Status window title Displays the name of the shared Internet connection. When the Internet gateway device is a computer running Windows XP and using ICS, this appears as the name of the shared dial-up or high-speed connection and the name of the ICS host computer, in the following form: connection name connection on host name status. For example, if your ICS host computer is named Main, and your shared Internet connection is named ICS, the title of the status window appears as: ICS connection on Main status.
Status Displays the connectivity status of the connection between the Internet gateway device and the Internet service provider (ISP). This status is updated in real time to provide accurate information about the shared Internet connection. The status that is displayed is always one of the following:
Connected or Enabled, when the Internet gateway device is connected to the ISP.
Disconnected or Disabled, when the Internet gateway device is not connected to the ISP.
Status only appears in the status window once the shared Internet connection is either completely connected or completely disconnected. When the shared Internet connection is a dial-up connection, a dialog box appears on the ICS host computer while the connection is being made, whether the connection was initiated from a network client or from the ICS host computer.
Duration Displays the duration of the current connection between the ICS host computer and the ISP. The duration shows days, hours, minutes, and seconds that have elapsed since the connection was last activated. It is updated in real time.
Speed Displays the speed in megabits per second (Mbps) at which the Internet gateway deviceís Internet connection is capable of operating. This is the speed that the Internet gateway device is capable of, not the speed at which data is actually sent to and from the Internet. Downloads, streaming media, and other types of data transfer might not actually be transferred at the speed indicated.
Shared connection statistics Displays the total number of bytes or packets that are sent and received between the Internet gateway device and the ISP. Whether the information is displayed in bytes or packets depends on which type is supported by your Internet gateway device.
My Computer Displays the total number of bytes or packets sent from or received by the client. If the client is connected to the Internet, the number of bytes or packets sent and received between the Internet gateway device and your computer is displayed. If your computer is communicating with other computers on your private network, the number of bytes or packets sent and received between your computer and the other network computers is displayed.
Disconnect button Allows users to immediately disconnect a shared dial-up connection or to disable the public adapter on the Internet gateway device. This button displays Disconnect if your shared Internet connection is a dial-up connection, and Disable if your shared Internet connection is a high-speed connection, such as DSL or cable modem.

When you view the Properties tab of the icon for the shared Internet connection, you can configure service definitions. The contents of the tab provide information only, with the exception of the option to display the shared Internet connection icon in the notification area on the taskbar. For more information, see Display network connection icons on the taskbar.

Display the shared Internet connection icon in the notification area
You can display the icon for the shared Internet connection in the notification area on the taskbar. For more information, see Display network connection icons on the taskbar.

With IGDDC, you can pause your mouse pointer over the icon to see the name of the shared Internet connection and the speed that the Internet gateway device is capable of.

If you click the icon in the notification area on the taskbar, a status window opens. This window provides statistics and the option to disconnect the shared Internet connection from the Internet. You can also right-click the icon to see a menu that provides an alternative way to disconnect the shared Internet connection from the Internet.

For more information about using the shared Internet connection icon, see Control the shared Internet connection , Using Internet Connection Sharing with Internet Gateway Device Discovery and Control, and Set permission for shared Internet connection control.

Notes

To open Network Connections, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.
To use IGDDC on computers running Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium Edition, run the Network Setup Wizard from the CD or floppy disk on those computers. For more information about the Network Setup Wizard, click Related Topics.
For IGDDC to work on computers running Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium Edition, Internet Explorer version 5.01 or later must be installed.
If Windows Firewall is enabled, UPnP framework must be selected on the Exceptions tab in Windows Firewall for IGDDC to work.
If UPnP architecture is not supported by your home router, IGDDC will not work.

To enable UPnP network functionality
Windows Firewall is turned on by default in Windows XP, which can help provide security for your computer. Consequently, the firewall blocks ports 1900 and 2869óthe ports that the UPnP framework in Windows requires for network communication. Follow this procedure to open those ports.

You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings might also prevent you from completing this procedure.

Open Windows Firewall.
On the General tab, click On (recommended). (If the Donít allow exceptions check box is selected, the UPnP ports remain closed even if you complete the rest of the steps in this procedure.)
Click the Exceptions tab.
Select the UPnP framework check box, and then click OK.
Notes

To open Windows Firewall, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Windows Firewall.
By default, this procedure sets up ports 1900 and 2869 to accept connections from your home or small office network only. To receive connections from all Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, select the UPnP framework check box, and then click Edit.

When ports 1900 and 2869 are blocked, UPnP messages are not sent over the network. Therefore, a UPnP control point program, such as Internet Gateway Device Discovery and Control Client, will not be able to discover or control UPnP devices attached to the network. Also, you will not see changes in the status of networked UPnP-certified devices (for example, when a device's power status changes from off to on), because Windows Firewall blocks incoming event messages.




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