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I get no display after forced shutdown.


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#1 Esi225

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:54 PM

Hey all, I've got a 2x 780ti on sli and an ASus rampage IV black edition hooked up to two brand new monitors. I have been having trouble with my headset and was hearing myself so after messing around with he USB's my keyboard randomly shut down while it was still plugged in so I tried to reboot, but then it got stuck on windows "shutting down" so I had to force boot it and now when I turn it on everything powers up but nothing displays to the monitors and it force boots at the press of the power switch instead of holding it like normal. It's a weird issue, can someone please help? I'm starting to get desperate here!

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#2 dicke

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 02:01 PM

Welcome,

That sounds very much like a power supply problem. One of the voltages is either incorrect or missing. Quickest solution is usually a new power supply

Keep us posted


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#3 dc3

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 02:33 PM

This means that Windows isn't getting completely loaded.  You may have damaged a file or files when you forced the shutdown.

 

Can you Boot into the Advanced Boot Options where you have the options for Safe Mode, Last Known Good Configuration, etc.?

 

If you can, try the Last Known Good Configuration.

 

If you can't do this do the following.

 

Instructions for a Windows 7 Repair installation.
 
A Windows 7 Repair Installation will require a installation disc.
 
If you do not have a Windows 7 installation disc you can download a free legal ISO image of Windows 7 SP1 at  Windows 7 Forums.  You will need to download the same version of Windows 7 that you have installed,  This image is hosted by the Digital River store which is an official distribution partner of Microsoft.  This is a genuine untouched image which is safe to download. 
 
Attention:  If you do have a Windows installation disc, skip Part A and go to Part B, Step 1b.
 
Part A, Steps 1a - 6a
 
How to burn ISO image using Windows Burn Disk Image.
 
Notice:  This applies only to Windows 7 and Windows 8, earlier versions do not have this.
 
1.  Place a blank CD or DVD in the tray of your optical drive and close the tray.
 
2.  After you have downloaded the ISO image you want to burn right click on the Start orb, then choose Windows Explorer.
 
3.  When Explorer opens click on Downloads in the left pane.  Scroll down till you find the ISO file you want and double click on it.  Click on Burn Disk Image.
 
4.  In the image below you will see Dick] burner:, this should be set to the optical drive you want to use.  Click on Verify disc after burning if you want to Windows to verity the disc image after burn.  Click on burn.
 
burndiskimage1_zpsb502b181.png
 
5.  In the image below you can see that the green progress bar, when the image is finished burning the bar will be filled.
 
burndiskimage2_zps17a9d6ff.png
 
6.  After the image has completed being burned click on Close
 
Please note:  In order to boot from this DVD you may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD/DVD-ROM is the first device in the boot order, and the hdd is the second device.
 
 
Part B, Steps 1b - 10b
 
1b)  Place the installation disc in the tray of the CD/DVD drive, close the tray and restart the computer.
 
2b)  You will be prompted to press any key to start the installation, I find the space bar handy.
 
At this point the setup process will load files, this will take several minutes.
 
3b)  You will now need to choose the  Language, Time, currency format, and Keyboard or input method that you'd like to use.
 
After this is done click on Next.
 
w71_zps6dbda47e.png
 
4b)  Click on the Repair your computer link at the bottom-left of the Install Windows window.
 
This link will begin the Windows 7 System Recovery Options.
 
w72_zps2a656a0c.png
 
5b)  System Recovery Options will now search your hard drive(s) for any Windows 7 installations.  This will take several minutes.
 
No participation is required on your part at this time, wait till it has finished and the next window opens.
 
w73_zpsd5483f05.png
 
6b)  Choose the Windows 7 installation that you'd like to perform the Startup Repair on, then click on Next
 
w74_zps490f9a17.png
 
7b)  Click on the Startup Repair link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
For a future reference, there are several other diagnostic and recovery tools available in the Windows 7 System Recovery Options including System Restore, System Image Recovery, Windows Memory Diagnostic, and Command Prompt.
 
8b)  The Startup Repair tool will now search for problems in the system files.
 
If Startup Repair finds a problem with any system files the tool may suggest a solution which you will need to confirm, or may solve the problem automatically.
 
w76_zps3dd75d83.png
 
9b)  Startup Repair will now attempt to repair whatever problems it found with system files.  
 
Note:  If Startup Repair did not find any problems with system files you won't see this step.
 
w77_zpsd8be95eb.png
 
Important: Your computer may or may not restart several times during this repair process.  This is normal, you should allow it to continue until you see the Restart your computer to complete the repairs window. 
 
10b)  Click on Finish, this will restart your computer.
 
w78_zpsd49257fb.png
 
It is possible that the Startup Repair will not be able to fix the problem.  If the Startup Repair tool determines this, it may automatically run the the repair after your computer restarts.  If it does not automatically run the repair but you are still having problems with Windows 7 repeat these steps to run Startup Repair again manually.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 Datcoolguy

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:26 PM

Also before you buy any new hardware as suggested above make sure your current hardware is faulty, i rather doubt anyone on a forum has money to throw away and as such we should all take the time to diagnose the problem before going around buying stuff.


"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#5 dc3

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:18 AM

If you suspect that there is a problem with the PSU it can be tested very easily with a multimeter with a 12V DC scale.

 

 
Reading and Testing Desktop PSU Rail Voltages
 
Caution: Please read this before continuing.
 
 
* Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. 
 
* There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.
 
* If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.
 
 
There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter. 
 
The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test.  They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.
 
There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.
 
For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in Wikipedia.
 
 
Analog Multimeter
 
th_analogedited.jpg
 
 
An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale. 
 
The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one. 
 
Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, Black (negative), and Red (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative). 
 
With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.
 
Digital Multimeter
 
th_digitalmeteredited.jpg
 
 
The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials. 
 
There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.
 
Yellow +12VDC
 
Blue -12VDC
 
Red +5VDC
 
White -5VDC
 
Orange +3.3VDC
 
There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.
 
The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.
 
Four pin Molex power connector
 
th_250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg
 
 
The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.
 
Five pin SATA power connector.
 
th_sata-power-cable.jpg
 
To read these voltages you will need to insert the Black (-) probe into any of the black  sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets.   To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the bac k of the connector where the wires enter.  Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side.  Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading.  To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.
 
Caution:  It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings.  This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.
 
To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 and run the Just Stress Test for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking.  Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures.  For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary.  I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling.  Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU.  If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.      
 
 
Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  
 
Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 Esi225

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:41 AM

Wow thanks for all the replies, this is the most helpful forum ever. I ended up fixing it. Somehow my SmartTV was set as the primary monitor so I just changed that up and everything is working fine now. 



#7 dc3

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:13 PM

Glad you got it sorted out.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 Datcoolguy

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:55 PM

Sometimes it's actually that simple isn't it, glad you figured it out!


Edited by Datcoolguy, 30 July 2014 - 08:55 PM.

"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#9 dicke

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 06:47 AM

:)

Stay well and surf safe


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E





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