Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Any suggestions for finding missing files on my hard drive?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 dorlow

dorlow

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:32 AM

Ok, I know this is a weird question.  I backup my hard drive.  But I have a lot of data.  And after a data disaster that computer crashes or hard drive dies (like just happened), I restore files but some how it seems like over the time some files came up missing before the disaster happened, or when I restored the files, I didn't notice a major folder is missing.  I don't notice it until months or years later.  
 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:03 AM

Actually there are a few "common" things to check.

1.  Check your security.  For instance:
1.1.  If you used a different userid from when it was backed up, and you restored the files exactly to the original location, they may be under s different folder.
1.2.  If you attempted to backup files under another userid, the backup may have failed for those files, because you didn't have the security to access those files.

2.  Check program parameters.  For instance:
2.1.  If the files you were attempting to backup hidden or system files, the backup program may not be able to access the files without sepecifically telling them to backup hidden and/or system files.

3.  Also, the backup program most likely wasn't able to backup files that were in use at the time of the backup.

4.  Backups should be done at least weekly basis, and if possible in the program you use, have it verify what it backed up, against what you told it to, verses what is actually on the list.

5.  When backing up, it is best not to use the computer, so that file collisions don't occur, and files you're expecting to get backed up failes, because they're in use.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:



#3 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,393 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:10:25 AM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:27 AM

Well...what method/software...are you using to backup?  How often do you backup?

 

What filetypes are "missing" and how do you know that they are missing?

 

Louis



#4 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,645 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:11:25 AM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:50 AM

I suggest you begin using disc imaging software on a regular basis. It is the best means to protect against situations such as you are describing.



#5 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,754 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:25 AM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:00 AM

Provided the files were in your latest backup you could try using Recuva to access these files.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:08 AM

I suggest you begin using disc imaging software on a regular basis. It is the best means to protect against situations such as you are describing.

 

Although the theory of imaging drives on a regular basis is fine, the point made in http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/541638/security-suggestions-post-2-of-7/#entry3426331 needs to be considered.  Especially where it starts "However, I know..." and forward.

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:
 



#7 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,645 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:11:25 AM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:23 AM

Keeping your system free of malware is a given in this instance (or should be, anyway). It does not impact the advantages of imaging your drive on a regular basis. Additionally, I personally do not do - or even recommend - incremental backups / images. I recommend full imaging of all drives on a regular basis saved to one or more external drives.

 

Clearly, if your system is infected your first priority is to get rid of that infection. Then, and only then can you move on to more mundane tasks such as backing up everything.



#8 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:14 PM

As I've indicated previously, there is no way to 100% guarantee the removal of malware/viruses, no matter how you (in the general sense) look at it.  There is no way to know every single file, registry entry, etc that was affected by the malware/virus.

Imaging is fine, but in my case, I do:

1.  As previously said in referenced post, when I build my computer up, I do it in stages, so I know the images are prestine.

2.  At LEAST WEEKLY perform backups of my critical files.  There are two copies of the backups (in ZIP files), and has 3-4 grandfather copies.  I start them at night before going to bed, and they're done in the morning.

3.  I have a folder called "G:\!!!!!!_quick_restore_!!!!!!".  This is a copy of the folder trees that are also in #2.  So for the current backup, I actually have three copies.  Then I can use Beyond Compare to compare "G:\!!!!!!_quick_restore_!!!!!!" to "C:", and quickly restore (thus the name) files back to the "C:" drive, as needed.

4.  I also have a program that I wrote to monitor, and automatically copy changed files to other backup areas.

2z80zl4.png

Have a great day!
:bananas: :bounce:
 



#9 Datcoolguy

Datcoolguy

  • Members
  • 303 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:25 PM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:24 PM

Most common back ups are to prevent against total failure (As the op's hard drive dying) and as such imaging can just be the way to go, we all know the different back up types have their drawbacks and advantages, either way unless OP is doing back ups by simply copy pasting folders i don't see how folders would just "go missing"


"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#10 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,393 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:10:25 AM

Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:30 PM

Focus...on topic, please.\

 

Louis






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users