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Can't import IE "favorites" to Chrome bookmarks?


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#1 saluqi

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 06:16 PM

On my old XP machine I had a large collection (hundreds) of bookmarks, aka favorites.  I followed the prescribed procedure to import them to Google Chrome on the new Windows 8 machine:

1. Export the "favorites" to an HTML file

2. Transfer that file to the new computer

3. In Chrome, select "bookmarks", then "manage bookmarks", then "import bookmarks from HTML file" and select the file

4. Open the HTML file (options were "Open" and "Open as read-only", I chose the first

 

The only trouble was, the bookmarks didn't transfer.

 

I did check the HTML file, it does indeed contain all my old bookmarks.

 

So what am I doing wrong?  The file is named "bookmark.htm" (rather than *.html) but that is XP's doing, not mine.

 

The original bookmarks/favorites consist of 1,274 "Internet shortcut" files in 118 folders under C:\Documents and Settings\Owner\Favorites .

 

Do I need to change the extension on the "bookmark" file?

 

 



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 01:02 AM

First, are you signed into Google Chrome? This will require the creation of a free GMail account. You don't have to use it for much, maybe to get a free piece of software, to to give out to those whom you know or suspect may spam you. Then try the below instructions. This was how I imported my Firefox bookmarks. 

 

https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/96816?hl=en

 

Hope this helps.  :)

 

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#3 NickAu

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 01:34 AM

I have been using Xmarks for a few years now without drama. You need to set up an account, its free. 

 

 

Backup and sync your bookmarks and open tabs across computers and browsers. Xmarks is also available for Firefox, Safari and IE.
Xmarks is the #1 bookmarking add-on. Xmarks synchronizes across multiple computers, and across web browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Internet Explorer. After you install the add-on, click on the Xmarks icon to start backing up and synchronizing your bookmarks.

Chrome Web Store - Xmarks Bookmark Sync - Google

 

 

.


Edited by NickAu1, 28 July 2014 - 01:35 AM.


#4 saluqi

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 01:24 PM

The possible catch here is that the bookmarks I want to import are on an XP machine that I would prefer not to put online.  I have already exported them to an HTML file and copied that file to the Windows 8 machine that is online.  I can create a Chrome/Gmail account and see if Chrome will then import from the HTML file?  I may probably end up using a Gmail address for the Outlook mail system anyway.



#5 saluqi

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:30 PM

So now I have created a Chrome account and a Gmail address ... but I am still unable to import the bookmarks from the HTML file.  It says "Success!" but in fact the bookmarks are not imported.

 

I cannot import them from "the other browser" (that would be Internet Explorer 8) because that other browser is on a different computer.

 

I exported the bookmarks from IE 8.  That produced a file with ".htm" extension.  I verified that that file did indeed contain all 1,274 bookmarks, and copied it to the new computer.  Tried the import. It didn't work.  Made extensions visible, and changed that one to ".html".  Tried again, and failed again.  Created a Google/Chrome account and tried again.  Still no dice.

 

I have now installed XMarks on my Chrome account, but I gather I will have to install it also on Internet Explorer 8 on the old machine in order to transfer the bookmarks.  At least, I don't find any mention of using an HTML file.  I suppose to use XMarks the old machine will have to be online.  That is what I wanted to avoid.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:46 PM

Yes, you'll have to put the older machine online, just for a few minutes, to allow these IE8 bookmarks to move over to Chrome. This shouldn't take long to accomplish & for the safety of your newer computer, you can always turn it off. Then your Google profile will update, and when you turn the new one back on, everything should be there shortly. 

 

It shouldn't take being online long to transfer bookmarks, though I can understand & appreciate your concern about placing an older computer online. If only more folks felt the same........

 

This deal of transferring things from XP to Windows 8 is looking harder than MS makes it out to be. Used to be, one could copy the Favorites folder to a USB drive, and the newer computer would give the option of merging. It's been some time since I've done this with IE, though one you have these, your IE bookmarks & some other preferences will transfer to a Windows 8 computer from another, simply by signing in with your MS account. A Windows Easy Transfer cable was one option to move things from one version of Windows to another with, but there's also others, see link below. In your case, you could use an external drive, to include Flash drives. The advantage you have with this, is you can use your installed security on Windows 8 to scan the contents before transfer. 

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/transfer-data-from-old-computer-to-windows-8/

 

Google Chrome is far more flexible, everything will transfer, including extensions, such as adblockers, to another computer with any OS. As long as you're signed into your Google account. 

 

Hopefully, this will be a one time deal & from then on out, you won't have to deal with this anymore. 

 

And down the road, if you want, you can create a Linux Home Server out of that XP computer, as a 3rd backup option. You can place it much anywhere you wish, well out of your way, for this purpose. I have a computer that shipped with Windows 7, should I get it going again, may do that myself, as it'll hold a large SATA ll HDD. 

 

Cat


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#7 saluqi

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 08:31 PM

Well, Xmarks did the trick.  It took more than an hour, but it's done now.  The imported bookmarks are all under "Other Bookmarks" which is a bit of a nuisance, but I suppose I can fix that.  I want those folders on the same level as those (very few) I've created on the new machine.

 

Taking the old computer offline is a matter of disconnecting the cable from the router.  The laptop is WiFi so stays online with or without a cable. Curiously, the download speed on WiFi is nearly twice as fast as with the cable connected (4.54 Mbps vs 2.53 Mbps). Does that make sense?  My ISP fellow says it ought to be much faster hard-wired.  I have a dual-band wireless router (Linksys EA2700).



#8 cat1092

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 11:06 PM

I would say that the connection should be at least as fast connected by Ethernet cable, being the signal is coming from the same router. All of the computers that I'm currently using, except one old one, generally are connected by Ethernet, though all, including my Dell tower PC, has wireless cards. One has what's known as Wi-Max, though I believe this is a paid service. Can see a network, but don't have the credentials to connect. 

 

The reason I don't use wireless much is for security. No way, unless it were a true emergency, would I make a transaction wirelessly, unless it were a cell based ISP, that's different from wi-fi. 

 

You may want to try placing the cable into another port of the router, or try another cable. Your ISP fellow is correct, if anything, wireless speeds may be slower. 

 

Your router is newer than mine, a Linksys WRT-160N V3 (I believe was part of a HP computer bundle). It was gifted to me when a relative upgraded & I installed hers, can't complain, given how much it's used (8-12 hours daily). It's also good enough not to cause a performance loss on my ISP speeds. 

 

Certainly better than the old TrendNet one that I was using before, though that one would show as a TP-Link model with more features if updated with the firmware. I'm not really into flashing routers though & if were, would go with DD-WRT or Tomato. These are more secure than what many routers ships with. Some of the newer Linksys routers came with an open door for infection (some type of "Moon" variant), though reconfiguration could fix most of these. 

 

Am glad to hear that Xmarks done the trick for you. One thing to keep in mind here, backup that original configuration. Things may have improved since I used that option in around 2009/2010 as a Firefox add-on, at the time, left a mess over three computers. One day, I happened to notice, the number of folders had doubled, so did the bookmarks. Though by now, hopefully someone or a group who cares has taken over & things has improved. 

 

Cat


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#9 saluqi

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 11:19 PM

Xmarks has just been bought by Lastpass, a password management vendor.  I don't know anything about them yet - but will soon need a password manager, something I've so far successfully avoided <G>.  The password proliferation associated with Microsoft accounts (I already have two, against my will), Xmarks, , Google, Chrome, etc.,is making my head swim.  My training as a mathematician still lets me think up esoteric passwords (you can, for example, start a Fibonacci series with any arbitrary seed, and convert some of the digits to letters, or use a different series algorithm, etc.,there's nothing sacred about Fibonacci - in  spite of Dan Brown <G>) but being now well past 80 I am finding the details of such tricks harder to remember unless I write them down.

 

So far I've been using the imported address book to send mail, no problems yet.  It didn't carry over the groups from the Outlook Express address book, but it won't be hard to re-create them, they aren't many or very large.

 

I did a series of speed tests from different locations.  All but one (that first one I already mentioned) ran much faster (roughly twice as fast) hard-wired as by wifi.  Case closed I think <G>.  My ISP guru was right (he usually is <G>).

 

I already have two backup copies (in different physical locations) of the original address book.

 

I still have to get around to splitting up the Outlook 2007 .pst file into half a dozen pieces and importing them (without duplicates) one at a time.  Curiously enough, the only folder that did get imported was the "Drafts" one - which contains some really important stuff, as it happens.  All those messages, that I didn't send immediately because they were too controversial, are there on the new Outlook 2013 system.  Also, when I was asked in which folder to put the imported address book, the list included all the old folders from the XP Outlook 2007 setup, although those folders are otherwise not visible in Outlook 2013 on the new machine.

 

Apart from that, the most significant remaining loose end is that I can't yet print from the new laptop.  I have a Bluetooth-capable HP Photosmart printer, at present connected by USB to the old XP computer.  Am I correct in thinking that I must first install the printer software on the laptop, and maybe do something to the printer so it listens to the local WiFi LAN?  Or is this properly the subject of another thread in another forum?



#10 cat1092

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 01:16 AM

That's a simple question, so unless you have issues, I'll answer here. See if HP has Windows 7 or 8 drivers for your printer. Normally, HP is one of the worst for supporting a newer OS. If no Windows 8 drivers, but Windows 7, you can try downloading these & installing in Compatibility Mode (for Windows 7). Also check the box to Run as Administrator. 

 

Sometimes this works, other times not. If not, then check Windows Update for drivers, with the printer turned on. If this produces no results, then you'll need to create a new Topic. 

 

My hunch is that if this printer was designed for XP, you'll need another. I've seen countless Topics where HP didn't support Windows 8 on printers, a few of which were released for Windows Vista/7. 

 

HP & Canon were the worst for Windows 8 support. Fortunately, my Kodak has ran most every OS I've installed it on. 

 

Glad to hear that Xmarks is better sponsored & that you're making progress with your emails. The good thing is, that when it's done, you should be set for years, 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 saluqi

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 04:49 PM

The printer is almost new - less than a year old.  I think Windows 8 was already out when I bought it.

 

It came with an installation CD.  I'm supposing that the first step is to run that on the laptop, and make the printer part of the network.

 

It's not really very important whether or not it runs from the XP machine any more, at least not while that machine is in its present XP configuration.  For obvious reasons I don't want to put the XP machine on the network.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:22 PM

In that case then, everything you need should be on the install CD. 

 

Again, I fully understand & appreciate why you don't want the XP machine on the network. If only more had the same thought process, we'd have less malware to deal with, come a short time, many of those XP machines are going to be one huge botnet. 

 

Good Luck with everything. 

 

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#13 saluqi

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 07:35 AM

Just realized I never made a "final report" on the printer issue.  The install disk did have everything necessary, and linked automatically to a website with the latest updates.  Setting up the printer on the wireless network turned out to be entirely painless.  It also remains connected via USB to the old XP machine, at least for the time being.  So no more issues here, all's well that ends well :)






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