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The old man needs a suggestion


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#1 lostsoul65

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

I work as a MIS Manager in Silicon Valley for 20 years and retired over 10 years ago. I had to pass a half dozen of Microsoft tests so I could get certified. I fell behind in computers so I would just like to study a book like I did in school so I can highlight and underline, sort of like the olden days to exercise my brain which seems to be going downhill. The A+ is 80% non-useable which I obtain 17 years ago. PC Build for Dummies would be demining. So does anyone have a suggestion of a book to learn about CPU’s, Mother Boards, RAM, Video Cards, and what makes a computer tick? I'm going to build another computer but this time I would like to make sure I know what I'm doing. I just need to exercise my brain before senility sets in.



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 05:33 PM

To be honest...IMO, the book era is over.

 

We have finally accepted the fact that change occurs frequently...which makes anything put in bound print outdated by light years by whatever is posted/available on the Internet.

 

The problem with the Internet is...you must be able to employ your brain when reading anything that's posted, understanding that it may be innocently incorrect or outdated by the winds of change.

 

There could never be...any single book which would provide valuable educational material on today's computing...there are many books which might provide such on small aspects of a very large, ever-changing computer environment.  Rather than take the time to read such books...I would suggest doing basic research via the Web...and supplementing that with some forum interaction.

 

I'm not a tech, not an IT person...just a consumer who tries to use the opportunities afforded...by today's computers.  And I've always known that I could never know everything...about anything :), I have always settled for knowing a little bit about a few things :).

 

There are a zillion websites that provide a lot of useful information...you just have to find the ones that fit whatever it is that you feel you need, knowing that whatever is posted is always fraught with the possibility of human error by the author.

 

Louis



#3 lostsoul65

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:05 PM

I know your right but the only thing I am trying to do is just get my brain in shape and leaning the new stuff to put a computer together. Putting a computer together is easy but knowing what every part does and how it interacts with one another is something I am behind on. There are books out here on what I'm looking for but I agree with you the book days are pretty much over. In the last 10 years I read E-books but I just wanted to re-live the past but it might be better to live in the present.Thanks



#4 ubuzz

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:16 PM

  :), I have always settled for knowing a little bit about a few things :).

 

 

Exactly!

 

 

I know your right but the only thing I am trying to do is just get my brain in shape and leaning the new stuff to put a computer together. Putting a computer together is easy but knowing what every part does and how it interacts with one another is something I am behind on. There are books out here on what I'm looking for but I agree with you the book days are pretty much over. In the last 10 years I read E-books but I just wanted to re-live the past but it might be better to live in the present.Thanks

 

I can relate.. sometimes I just like to pick up a book and read.  Maybe as Louis suggested you could do some basic research on the web for the information you want to find.  When you find articles and information that you feel might be useful you can print them out so you can underline and read again.



#5 jonuk76

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:23 PM

The A+ I studied a while back covered things from the obsolete, to reasonably current.  It's not really going to cover cutting edge technology.  But if you want to know for example, the difference between different USB standards, or the difference between PCI and PCI Express, etc. with somewhat detailed explanations of how they work, it's a good option.

 

I had a copy of this book many many editions ago, and I thought it was pretty good.  I haven't seen a recent edition, but it seems well reviewed.

 

A lot of people "dis" Wikipedia, but most of the pieces about technology are pretty good IMO.  Excellent if you just want to remind yourself of something.


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#6 ubuzz

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:37 PM

 

 

I had a copy of this book many many editions ago, and I thought it was pretty good.  I haven't seen a recent edition, but it seems well reviewed.

 

 

 

I had a previous edition of that book as well.  If you were wanting a book on hardware then that would be a good choice.



#7 Kilroy

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

What you learned 17 years ago for your A+ gives you the foundation that you need today.  It would be helpful to know what you feel you need to know.  I highly recommend Maximum PC to keep up to date on current and coming technologies.

 

Things haven't changed so much in the last 17 years.



#8 mjd420nova

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 10:59 PM

Over the years, the basic building blocks have remained the same.  Mixing and matching plug in cards can be daunting but I use Fry's Electronics and they take returns, no questions.  The CPU is just more powerful, needing more cooling.  Video cards and some on board GPU have their own fans and depending on the MOBO format may be difficult to mount.  Peripheral connections are mostly the same, like VGA but HDMI is coming to the forefront.  USB is remaining upwardly compatible from 2.0 to 3.0.  Hardware is just that, software is  well  soft.  Being here in the Silicon Valley makes access to some of the newest stuff before most but I prefer to research first and adhere to a meager budget when price finally drop within range.






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