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I am interested in learning Linux


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 08:44 PM

I am interested in learning Linux and I have chosen to go with Mint Cinnamon Edition

I have downloaded a Linux Mint Cinnamon Edition pdf from http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php

I am into the first 7 pages and I have some basic questions

I’m sure they will be addressed further into my training but it wouldn’t surprise me that by the time clarifications come along my mind will be “buzzing” with too many more questions by then

 

On page 6 “If you don't know which edition to use, choose the MATE Edition. It's not as popular as the Cinnamon Edition but it is compatible with a wider variety of hardware specifications”

--- Being a Linux newbie, I have no idea of the significance of that statement

--- Does anyone have a simple explanation to help me understand it?

 

Also on page 6 “If you intend to redistribute or to make commercial use of Linux Mint in the USA or in Japan and if you’re not sure about patent legislation you should use the “No Codecs” installation images”

--- I don’t intend to “redistribute or to make commercial use of Linux Mint”

--- So I imagine there is a “Codex” installation

--- Will that be the case?

 

Then on page 7, for downloading an ISO in order to install Linux Mint there is mention of choosing between a Torrent link or a download mirror

--- Well here is where I put up the Caution sign

--- I’ve never used a Torrent whatever as I’m under the impression there are potential malware concerns

--- Even on the Mirror downloads, aren’t there Torrents whatever included within it?

--- So my question here is what kind of security if any is there in downloading an ISO in order to install Linux Mint?

--- One item I’m looking forward to is Linux’s ability to be much more safe and secure than Windows but my concern is I will be up against some potential malware issues right up front

 

That’s it for now, thank you

 

PS I do have a prior post from some months ago but I was indicating I would be using my retired XP computer but I prefer to use a laptop if I can and I don't want to confuse using the specs referencing my retired XP computer. I'm pretty sure I will be able to find a decent laptop without an OS for only a few hundred dollars to meet my needs. I'm a simple computer user and I don't see why I'll need buy something expensive. When I'm ready I'll ask for help in that area. Right now I want to read the couple of training PDF's for Linux Mint Cimarron  

 

 



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#2 brian2009

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 11:09 PM

I'm not much more than a newbie with Linux but I've had similar questions. Others will know much more.

 

You'll most likely try several versions of Linux so it's not too important the get THE perfect distro the first time.

 

1. Go ahead and try the MATE version. Just jump in and start playing with it. I use Precise Puppy because it works, but I'm always looking around.

 

2.  I'd get a codex version. It's got to be better than a non-codex version.

 

3. i always just use the mirror download option. Torrents are for Torrent People, which I'm not.

 

Check out www.distrowatch.com. It will let you see the big picture of what's currently out there.

 

Have fun. Don't expect to learn everything before you start using it. You just have to spend time playing with it.

 

Good luck.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 11:36 PM

cmptrgy, I recall your interest in Linux some time back & understood you weren't quite ready yet. Well, now that you are, Welcome to the Linux section! :thumbup2:

 

Here is an ebook that covers a lot about Linux MInt Cinnamon & was written this year. 

 

http://it-ebooks.info/book/3554/

 

Yes, there's a No Codecs version available, but have never used it. I would presume that's for those whom wants no multimedia support. You best bet is getting Linux Mint straight from the source, as I have for years. I don't use Torrent software, that creates a hole in your Firewall & exposes you to malware. If you have Firefox installed as a browser, then the Down Them All add-on is an excellent download manager. Firefox also happens to be the default browser of Linux Mint, though Chrome can be installed. So this is a good time to try one of the included features, though you have to install the add-on through the Firefox Menu. Go to Add-ons, a page with a search box will open, where it says "Search for all add-ons", type Down Them All & click Enter. There will be a description & a link to Add to Firefox, restart where prompted. 

 

From then on, when you download anything, Down Them All will be a choice to use, great for large downloads. 

 

The "mirror" downloads are servers donating their bandwidth to distribute Linux Mint & some other Linux OS's. The James Madison University one is what I normally use. You won't get infected by this download. 

 

You want either the 32 or 64 bit version of the top choice (Cinnamon). That is, if your computer isn't that old, if so, you'll be better off with MATE, it's actually the #1 Linux MInt desktop, however Cinnamon is growing. It's just that MATE & Xfce runs better on older computers. I still run MATE on all but one & it's a great OS too. Less eye candy, but still a great desktop. 

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

Best of Luck,

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 July 2014 - 11:41 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 pane-free

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 07:53 AM

FYI:

 

a) Window Manager (WM) vs Desktop Environment (DE)

 

B) Codecs  &  MultimediaCodecs

 

c)  Package Management

 

 


Edited by pane-free, 20 July 2014 - 07:55 AM.

There comes a time in the affairs of man when he must take the bull by the tail and face the situation.
W. C. Fields

#5 NickAu

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 06:29 PM

 

Then on page 7, for downloading an ISO in order to install Linux Mint there is mention of choosing between a Torrent link

For some strange reason Linux people think Torrents are ok. While it is legal to share Linux on torrents, I do not think its safe.

 

Quote taken from.

Answers to common security questions - Best Practices   .By Quietman7

 

File Sharing (P2P), Torrents, Keygens, Cracks, Warez, and Pirated Software are a Security Risk

The practice of using any torrent, file sharing, peer-to-peer (P2P) program (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, BitComet, uTorrent, BitLord, BearShare, Azureus/Vuze, Skype, etc), keygens, hacking tools, cracking tools, warez, or any pirated software is a serious security risk which can turn a computer into a malware honeypot or zombie.

:step1: File Sharing, Torrents, and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Programs

File sharing networks are thoroughly infested with malware according to security firm Norman ASA and many of them are unsafe to visit or use. The reason for this is that file sharing relies on its members giving and gaining unfettered access to computers across the P2P network. This practice can make you vulnerable to data and identity theft, system infection and remote access exploit by attackers who can take control of your computer without your knowledge.

Quote

...It is almost never safe to download executable programs from peer-to-peer file sharing networks because they are a major source of malware infections.

Software Cracks: A Great Way to Infect Your PC

Even if you change the risky default settings to a safer configuration, downloading files from an anonymous source increases your exposure to infection because the files you are downloading may actually contain a disguised threat. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install malware. Many malicious worms and Trojans, such as the Storm Worm, target and spread across P2P files sharing networks because of their known vulnerabilities.

Further some file sharing programs are bundled with other free software you may download (sometimes without the knowledge or consent of the user) and can be the source of various issues and problems to include Adware, and browser hijackers as well as malware.

Even the safest P2P file sharing programs that do not contain bundled spyware, still expose you to risks because of the very nature of the P2P file sharing process. By default, most P2P file sharing programs are configured to automatically launch at startup. They are also configured to allow other P2P users on the same network open access to a shared directory on your computer. The best way to eliminate these risks is to avoid using P2P applications and torrent web sites.

 

...It is almost never safe to download executable programs from peer-to-peer file sharing networks because they are a major source of malware infections.

In this case, The Linux ISO is the executable.

 

 

When I'm ready I'll ask for help in that area. Right now I want to read the couple of training PDF's for Linux Mint Cimarron 

+1 You are doing it the right way, Read up on the subject then proceed, Well done more people could learn something from your example.


Edited by NickAu1, 20 July 2014 - 06:35 PM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 09:03 PM

 

 

 

Quote

 

When I'm ready I'll ask for help in that area. Right now I want to read the couple of training PDF's for Linux Mint Cimarron 

+1 You are doing it the right way, Read up on the subject then proceed, Well done more people could learn something from your example.

 

+1!  :thumbup2:

 

If more future Linux users done a little research prior to diving in headfirst, a lot of needless frustration will be prevented. 

 

Study as long as needed. This topic will be waiting on you when you're ready.  :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 cmptrgy

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 10:11 PM

I have chosen to start with Linux Mint Cinammon because I need to start somewhere

http://it-ebooks.info/book/3554/ is where I got the manual I’m reading now

--- It only has 46 pages

--- Since I’m a newbie, I doubt it will be a quick read but it looks like a well written eBook

www.distrowatch.com is on my list

Firefox will be my browser

I’m glad I asked about not using Torrent

--- Now I have confidence in checking out one of the mirror downloads and I will look for the James Madison University

Instead of a desktop, I’ll be looking for a laptop as new as possible

I also have a ShellIntro.pdf > An Introduction to the Linux Command Shell For Beginners

--- It only has 13 pages and since I’m not a superstitious person I’m sure that will come in handy

Why stop there? I also have a Linux Mint Essentials.pdf guide

--- It has 324 pages. I won’t wait to read all of this before jumping into Linux Mint

--- I’ll keep it handy and will read what I can when the time comes

So I have enough reading material to get started

I’m sure I will have more learning questions as I go along.

Thanks everyone



#8 cat1092

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:46 PM

You're welcome & I would like to see more aspiring Linux users take your approach. 

 

Always free free to ask questions, there's no thing as a "dumb question" here. We all came from the same point where you are today, many of us less empowered with knowledge. Back in 2009, it took me a few months just to find a suitable OS for my needs. Back then, Linux Mint was a small, but clearly a distro on the rise & for good reason. In late 2011, it edged Ubuntu out for the #1 position & has never looked back. Today, Linux Mint users outnumbers that of Ubuntu by a 2 to 1 margin. The fact that the Ubuntu developers installed Amazon spyware into the Ubuntu ISO didn't sit well with many of it's users. 

 

That reason is that Linux Mint is as close as a drop in replacement for Windows as it gets. Yes, there is Zorin OS with the look changer, but it's all cosmetic. One has to "donate" to get the full version. If I'm paying for software, then I rightfully expect professional support. Zorin OS doesn't provide that level of support, they're simply charging for drivers & multimedia support. Not one on one on demand support. Though there are distros that provides this, these are expensive & a comes with a steeper learning curve. 

 

Though you have a learning curve in front of yourself, I don't see you going wrong with Linux Mint. You also can learn at your own pace, as I did. I'm still learning after 5 years. Begin with using the OS as much as possible for daily tasks, such as when visiting the forum, checking email & general Web usage. Firefox (& Google Chrome) both works the same way as in Windows. The Opera browser is a 3rd option, however it's not been updated for Linux for awhile & personally speaking, Chrome is just as good or better. Using the OS is the best way to learn. Today's Linux is as user friendly as it gets, many doesn't bother with the Terminal, though I suggest to everyone to enable the Firewall, ASAP after the first boot. 

 

To enable the ufw Firewall, a simple but effective one, simply open the Terminal & type in "sudo ufw enable", you'll be prompted for your password. When typing it, you'll not see it, nor the movement of anything. Just press Enter after typing the password. 

 

Though it's best to get as much software from the Software manager, Google Chrome is an exception. It's not in there. Chromium is there instead, what Google Chrome is built on. It's a good browser, however other things has to be added for full function. That makes the straight download of Google Chrome a better choice. I'm taking it you're getting a 64 bit notebook & installing a 64 bit Linux Mint Cinnamon, so you'll need to download the 64 bit Google Chrome for Ubuntu/Linux Mint. It'll be a .deb file & the 2nd option offered for Linux. 

 

https://www.google.com/intl/en_us/chrome/browser/

 

I mention Google Chrome, because it's always better to have two browsers over one. Plus it seems that Firefox has slowed some over the last few years, something that has made Chrome a more popular option for many user, both Linux & Windows. 

 

There is a lot of good software included with Mint out of the box. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 brian2009

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 03:05 AM

comptrgy

Don't hold back on the questions.

 

These threads are a great place to learn from, but if all the topics are advanced in nature then their ability to help newbies (or slightly better) is much diminished.

 

I know I ask questions here that I could probably easily (sort of) search out myself, but the experience of those who help here can really save much time and trouble.

 

I know I tried Mint on my faster (Win 7)  notebook but for some reason I wasn't that impressed. I'll have to fire it up again. (As I recall it was painfully slow, which doesn't make sense).

 

I think more often than not I just don't have enough experience with Linux to really evaluate all it has to offer.



#10 cmptrgy

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 07:17 AM

There's no thing as a "dumb question". Excellent

--- When I was in the working world and had to train operators on the processes I was responsible for I always told them “Don’t feel stupid, the only stupid question is the one that isn’t asked”. I remember my roots: I literally was the dumbest of the dumbest when I had to learn how to use computers at work. At that time the company was transitioning from MS-DOS to I believe it was Windows 3.0 or 3.1. But I took the time to at least understand what’s going on depending on the situation at hand. I’m not an expert but as my username indicates, I’m just a cmptrgy. My first home bought computer was Windows 95, then Windows 98SE which I kept going about 1 ½ years beyond EOL, moved into XP and now Windows7. I have helped family, friends & volunteers also including Windows 2000, Vista and todays Windows 8/8.1 On the latter OS’s I don’t know them, I just figure out what needs to be done. I don’t have any official computer training but I’ve got a degree in the “school of hands on (OJT) training”. The diploma is invisible but the benefit was I knew when I did something wrong immediately and found out how to take care of issues immediately. So now I’m taking the time to pick up on Linux. I’m used to computer changes and like challenges; and as far as Linux goes I hope the time will come that they will give Microsoft serious competition



#11 cat1092

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 11:31 PM

brian 2009, 

 

 

 

I think more often than not I just don't have enough experience with Linux to really evaluate all it has to offer.

 

My guess is that if you're like most of us, you also don't use all that Windows has to offer. Which really, can be just as, if not more, complicated than many versions of Linux. There are many features under the hood of Windows 7 Pro that only a fraction of it's users takes advantage of. The only reason why I chose Pro over Home Premium, was that prior to the release of SP1, many of us were still doing our "priority" items, such as tax returns, on XP Pro. Well, Windows 7 Pro users has access to a virtual XP in XP Mode, one of the extra benefits of the OS. So we had two OS's in one, on demand. 

 

The ability to access more than 16GB RAM is also a benefit of Pro. 

 

Many of the other features, most home users doesn't know exists, let alone use these & today, XP Mode usage is likely at all time lows. 

 

As to Linux Mint, it'll be the same way, Many of us who uses the OS, including myself, are barely scratching the surface of what's under the hood. And as long as one doesn't need all that the OS offers, it doesn't matter. What does matter, is the features that you have use for & able to access these. In addition to Firefox & Google Chrome, VLC Media Player is included in the install, the very same one as that of Windows, there is Skype for Linux, while the look is a bit different, still works much the same. And many finds LibreOffice a great drop in replacement for MS Office. Which also has a Windows version. 

 

http://www.libreoffice.org/

 

For starters, a nice secure & responsive Web browser w/out the overhead of layers of security apps. This is the starting point & where I began. And still much of what I use Mint for today, to have a secure Web session w/out the fear of malware overtaking the computer. Note that by this statement, I'm not saying it's physically impossible to be attacked, but it would be very hard to accomplish. First you would have to physically enter your password to allow it, secondly, the malware would have to be written for the Linux you're running & targeting you personally, as there's no Linux malwares "in the wild". 

 

Thirdly, at this time, the Linux community is small & malware distributors prefers larger (& easier) targets to attack. 

 

So security is one huge plus in your favor. 

 

 

 

I know I tried Mint on my faster (Win 7)  notebook but for some reason I wasn't that impressed. I'll have to fire it up again. (As I recall it was painfully slow, which doesn't make sense).

 

May have been the particular OS version, which one was it? Earlier Cinnamon versions were reported by many to be slow, especially at boot. However though that desktop is still growing, it has matured & will only get better as time passes. If it were the main (MATE) version, that one is now faster also. Windows 7 has had so many post SP1 updates to the point it's slowed the OS. SP2 is badly needed, was supposed to include native USB 3.0 support, but MS is determined to shove an OS down it's customer's throats that's not wanted in Windows 8. 

 

On all of the computers which I have both Windows 7 & Linux MInt 17 installed on, three of them, MInt holds it's own quite well. The one that I'm on now is installed to SSD & can be seen in the Speccy specs of my sig. Mint 17 is installed to the smaller of the two Samsung 840 EVO's & is blazing fast. 

 

And doesn't run bad on the other two where it's on a HDD. If I were to take boot times away, most everything else is as fast as on the SSD's on those notebooks. 

 

So really, it's a matter of downloading the latest version, install & update it, check for 3rd party drivers (optional, only needed if the open source ones aren't doing the job), enable the ufw firewall as pointed out above. And simply use the OS at your pace. That is key, learning at the pace you feel comfortable with. As far as using the OS to browse the Web with, that's a great as any starting point & the rest will come to you. Wasn't it that way with Windows? The first time I actually used a computer was on the job, a handheld unit for route sales, at the age of 30 & of course, store computers to enter the items I was bringing in (fresh product) & taking out (stales). I don't have any idea of which OS the handhelds used, only they were tied to an Apple computer at the distribution center, but most of the store computers were earlier Windows versions. 

 

I guess then, my first computer usage was on the job. A few years later, after I was promoted, finally had my own office with a real desktop computer, one handed down from the corporate office. With a company issued Yahoo Mail account, though I only used this for company business. Up until that point, like many others, I was one of those anti-computer types, knowing that the company used these to keep track of production, in my case, sales. When I had a slumping week or two, my supervisor would know & on what end. Though when I was on the lower end of the pole, I didn't like it, once I was promoted, I began to appreciate computers. This was because I was paid a base supervisor salary & the rest was based on route average, a percentage of that of the employees under me. Based on sales, I could go behind and change the product orders that sales associates placed to what I felt would move better. 

 

And the thing is, I could have done this just as well on a Linux Mint OS as I could Windows (the company switched from Apple to Windows in 1996). 

 

The fact is, computers (& Linux MInt) can be complicated to use, but doesn't have to be. Only a small percentage of users will need advanced features & home users can keep things as simple as needed. That's what I do. The most complicated tasks that I perform on Linux is running virtual machines. That's running an OS within an OS. This allows me to try new OS to see if I like them, plus I have a dedicated Windows 7 VM on demand for when needed. 

 

Whenever I need to learn something new, Google is a step away, with an occasional assist from Bing. Occasionally I will have to ask for assistance, but usually my question has already been asked many time & answered just as many.  

 

Cat 


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 cmptrgy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 06:55 AM

Cat "home users can keep things as simple as needed"; that's how I approach helping the people I can

--- I ask someone "how much can a computer do?"

--- They usually raise their hands like umpteen things they don't understand

--- Then I ask them "what do you want to know how to do?"

--- Many times that seals the deal of accomplishing what they need to know

--- Unfortunately the biggest drawback I run into is they claim they won't take the15 to 30 minutes but then trudge along forever struggling along

--- Due to past experience though, I'll write down by hand what is needed, leave them my phone number and most of the time they will call back and finally things still come together at least within reason

 

Brian, Cat is offering excellent advice along with so many others; I'm learning a lot in my basic training just by matching up their inputs along with my Linux Mint "training manual" and I look forward to using Linux Mint 

--- I'm not worried about all it can do; I'll be happy to know I'll be able to do what I need to do

--- Even if I were an advanced user; that would come together



#13 cmptrgy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 03:27 PM

I’m using Linux Mint Essentials.pdf eBook http://it-ebooks.info/book/3554/ as my training manual

Using the Terminal is being brought a section titled Burn the ISO to DVD on page 10 without having had any instructions on how to do so yet . If it’s necessary to know how to understand those items by using the Terminal I can wait until I get to “An Introduction to the Linux Command Shell For Beginners” pdf manual I will be reading after I finish reading this training manual I’m using now. So I can wait for answers to my questions if it’s better to do so

 

Toward the bottom of page 10 into the top of page 11, there is the following information

--- If you're running Linux and would like to use the terminal, from the directory you have downloaded the image to cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 linuxmint.iso

--- Replacing the numbers after dev= with the appropriate device number for your disc drive and using the proper iso-name. You can run cdrecord –scanbus (Page 11) to find this out.

--- You may need to be root to run these commands

 

On the “Replacing the numbers after dev= with the appropriate device number for your disc drive” there are 3 numbers 1,0,0

--- Since this is for Linux, does that mean the the install disc or partition is identified as disc 1?

--- Are the 0,0 for other discs or partitions if there are any?

 

On the “You may need to be root to run these commands”

--- How do I “be root” if necessary?



#14 NickAu

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 04:44 PM


 

On the “You may need to be root to run these commands”

--- How do I “be root” if necessary?

When you type the sudo command . 

 

Eg

Typing apt-get install boink, Will do nothing without sudo infront of it.

sudo allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user, as specified in the sudoers file. /etc/sudoers

sudo - Linux Command - Unix Command


Edited by NickAu1, 22 July 2014 - 05:30 PM.


#15 cmptrgy

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:53 AM

Thanks NickAu1

Looking over the commands makes me think of how I had to use some MS-DOS commands when I had to learn how to use computers at work.I didn't have to really get into it but at least I can relate to what's going on






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