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Black Screen Problem


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#1 jesmeff

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 10:42 AM

I am currently trying to fix a laptop for someone, but I'm stumped. The problem is, the computer (Dell Inspiron 1525) will load almost normally, but will not make it to the log in screen. Instead, the background is completely black and there is only the white mouse cursor. I can move the cursor, but I can not click on anything, Ctrl-Alt-Delete will not work, sticky keys does not work, no key or combination of keys work. I've tried booting into all of the safe modes, only to get the same result. Is there anything anybody on here has done that fixes this problem, or should I just install a fresh copy? Oh, and they said there was a blue screen error before this problem started (picture attatched). Any and all help appreciated.

 

- Jesi M.

Attached Files


Edited by jesmeff, 18 July 2014 - 11:24 AM.


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#2 jesmeff

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 10:44 AM

Although I was thinking of pulling the hdd and running chkdsk from another computer (since I can not use command prompt on this one currently). If I try it and it fixes the problem, I'll make an update.



#3 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:10 AM

Do not install the hdd in another computer.  There are chipset identifiers which are recognized by Windows when it boots.  If you install the hdd with a different motherboard Windows will see the identifiers of the other chipset and essentially will confuse Windows.  In most cases you will need to reinstall the operating system.

 

For future reference there is a way that this can be done.

 

If you run sysprep on the hdd with Windows before moving it you should be be able to move it and boot from it on the other computer. You want to remove all hardware identifiers from the hdd, this generalizes the drive.
 
Click on the Start orb, then type cmd in the Search box.
 
cmd will appear under Programs above the search box, right click on it and choose Run as administrator.
 
This will open the Elevated Command Prompt.
 
In the Elevated Command Prompt type in CD C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep, then 
use the command: "sysprep /generalize /oobe /shutdown"
Don't power the drive back on until it's in the other computer.
Note: You'll want to install matching chipset drivers, video drivers, etc.. after moving the drive.
 
 
Have you tried booting into Safe Mode?
 
Do you have the installation disc for this version of Windows?

Edited by dc3, 18 July 2014 - 11:12 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 jesmeff

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:19 AM

 

Do not install the hdd in another computer.  There are chipset identifiers which are recognized by Windows when it boots.  If you install the hdd with a different motherboard Windows will see the identifiers of the other chipset and essentially will confuse Windows.  In most cases you will need to reinstall the operating system.

 

For future reference there is a way that this can be done.

 

If you run sysprep on the hdd with Windows before moving it you should be be able to move it and boot from it on the other computer. You want to remove all hardware identifiers from the hdd, this generalizes the drive.
 
Click on the Start orb, then type cmd in the Search box.
 
cmd will appear under Programs above the search box, right click on it and choose Run as administrator.
 
This will open the Elevated Command Prompt.
 
In the Elevated Command Prompt type in CD C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep, then 
use the command: "sysprep /generalize /oobe /shutdown"
Don't power the drive back on until it's in the other computer.
Note: You'll want to install matching chipset drivers, video drivers, etc.. after moving the drive.
 
 
Have you tried booting into Safe Mode?
 
Do you have the installation disc for this version of Windows?

 

I can not do that. I can not run anything and there is no tool bar. Below is what I'm dealing with.

 

blacksod.jpg


I do appreciate the help though.



#5 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:31 AM

I realize that, I was only trying to stop you from installing the hdd in another computer.

 

The reference for the future was exactly that.  In the future if you want to install a hdd with Windows installed use the instructions I posted.

 

Now, please answer my two last questions.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 zingo156

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:34 AM

Can you boot to system repair and do a restore point? You may be able to get to command prompt by loading system repair as well. Use the same F8 key to get to the boot menu options list but chose repair instead of safe mode.


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#7 jesmeff

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:49 AM

I realize that, I was only trying to stop you from installing the hdd in another computer.
 
The reference for the future was exactly that.  In the future if you want to install a hdd with Windows installed use the instructions I posted.
 
Now, please answer my two last questions.


Sorry about that. I have tried safe mode (with networking and command prompt as well) and the result was still the same; black screen, white cursor and thats it. I do not have the install disk.

#8 jesmeff

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 11:50 AM

Can you boot to system repair and do a restore point? You may be able to get to command prompt by loading system repair as well. Use the same F8 key to get to the boot menu options list but chose repair instead of safe mode.

I have tried that, but it still booted to a black screen, white cursor.

#9 zingo156

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:10 PM

After selecting "repair" is there an option to load command prompt from the repair options menu? If there is. Try running the commands below:

 

chkdsk /f /r  (one space between chkdsk    /f   and    /r)

 

sfc /scannow    (one space between sfc   and   /scannow)

 

You might need to specify the C: drive for both commands or change directories to the c drive and then run the commands.


Edited by zingo156, 18 July 2014 - 01:24 PM.

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#10 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:25 PM

The option for Safe Mode is located in the Advance Boot Options.  There is another I would like you to try, this is Last Known Good Configuration.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#11 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:03 PM

@zingo156

 

What you are suggesting is found in the System Recovery Options which can only be accessed by the use of the installation disc.

 

The following is from Grinler's tutorial "How to automatically repair Windows Vista using Startup Repair"

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/repair-windows-with-windows-startup-repair/#overview

 

 

If you are having problems starting Windows Vista, then your first step is to use the automated repair tool called Startup Repair. Startup Repair is a diagnostic tool that can be accessed via the Windows Recovery Environment. In order to start the Windows Recovery Environment you must boot your computer off of the Windows Vista DVD that you purchased or that came with your computer. To start this process, insert the Vista DVD into your DVD drive and turn your computer on. Your computer will start and you should see your BIOS listing your hardware and other information. When that information is cleared, your computer will see that a bootable DVD is inserted and present a prompt similar to Figure 1 below.

 

To the best of my knowledge, without the installation disc or being able to boot normally or in Safe Mode you can't access the startup repair or command options.


Edited by dc3, 18 July 2014 - 01:03 PM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 zingo156

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:10 PM

I believe the Dell Inspiron 15xx series had a recovery partition with a few recovery options. If I recall correctly on the 1525 and 1545 in the dell recovery options menu there was an option for using command prompt.

 

If the restore partition is still working, when you go to the advanced boot options menu using F8 and select repair, it should boot to the dell factory restore partition and load the recovery options. From the dell menu, there may be a way to launch command prompt. It has been a while since I have used a 1525 or 1545 so I could be wrong.


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#13 zingo156

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:18 PM

IGNORE THE RED ARROW, click on command prompt if you have the menu shown below in the link, then run the commands posted above.

 

This is the menu I am thinking of: http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lancelhoff.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2009%2F01%2Fdell-factory-image-restore.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lancelhoff.com%2Frestore-dell-studio-to-factory-settings%2F&h=400&w=449&tbnid=waNwuQnf3wRmwM%3A&zoom=1&docid=3K3Bim8tPUhOQM&ei=Q2TJU-ikItCmyASv34JA&tbm=isch&ved=0CB0QMygBMAE&iact=rc&uact=3&dur=550&page=1&start=0&ndsp=20

 

Command prompt may be in the list.


Edited by zingo156, 18 July 2014 - 01:26 PM.

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#14 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:43 PM

I see, this is an addition to the Advanced Boot Options from Dell.

 

I did find confirmation that it does list the Repair options and that it will access the System Recovery Options.  But I can't find any information indicating that these are the same Windows options which requires the installation disk to access.

 

I guess we will find out. 


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 zingo156

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:49 PM

I see, this is an addition to the Advanced Boot Options from Dell.

 

I did find confirmation that it does list the Repair options and that it will access the System Recovery Options.  But I can't find any information indicating that these are the same Windows options which requires the installation disk to access.

 

I guess we will find out. 

It was an addition that dell did.

 

It seems like what they did was create an image of the disc for their recovery partition and then included a link to the dell factory restore option added to the stock windows recovery options at the bottom.

 

Every dell computer that I worked on that had Vista or newer with the recovery partition intact, had the recovery options menu. If the computer was reloaded from a disc and the partitions deleted then the disc would be required.

 

As far as I could tell dells recovery partition had the same windows recovery options you would find on the disc.


Edited by zingo156, 18 July 2014 - 01:52 PM.

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