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How to check md5sum


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#1 Al1000

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 12:46 AM

This is possibly the easiest way for new Linux users to check md5sum.

1) Navigate to the directory where the file you want to check is located.

2) Right click in an empty space in the window, and select ''Open Terminal Here.''

snapshotKubuntu6_zps13925876.jpeg

3) In the terminal that opens, type ''md5sum'' and the name of the file, then press Return/Enter on your keyboard.

4) Wait for your computer to scan the file, after which it will produce a long number, like the one I have highlighted below.

snapshotKubuntu7_zps6521e7c6.jpeg

That's all there is to it.

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#2 NickAu

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 01:02 AM

+1

Works every time.



#3 Al1000

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 06:26 AM

I hope that this goes some way to encourage folk to use the terminal more, as I reckon they'll be glad that they did.

Here is a slightly more ''advanced,'' but easier way, as it doesn't involve having to type long file names.

1) Follow steps 1 & 2 in the OP.

2) Type ''ls'' and press Return/Enter on the keyboard. This command will list the files in the directory that you are in.

3) Type ''md5sum'' followed by the first letter, or the first few letters, of the file you want to check. In my case all I have to type is ''md5sum k'' because the file I want to check is the only file in that directory that begins with ''k.'' But if for example I had another file beginning ''ka'' I would have to type ''md5sum ku'' so that the computer knows which of the files beginning with the letter ''k'' I am referring to.

(Note: do not press Return/Enter on your keyboard at this stage)

snapshotKubuntu9_zpsed288cf9.jpeg

4) Press ''Tab'' on your keyboard, and the terminal will automatically complete the name of the file.

snapshotKubuntu10_zps5f6fce08.jpeg

5) Press Return/Enter on your keyboard, and the computer will scan the file as per step 4 in the OP.

That's all there is to it. :)

#4 cat1092

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 12:09 PM

Al1000, thanks for the tutorial! :thumbup2:

 

I'm sure that many Linux users will find it to be a great resource. Even those of us who has ran the OS for years. 

 

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#5 pcpunk

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 11:40 PM

Yes this is awesome, thanks!


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#6 ubuzz

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 08:38 AM

Autocomplete in Linux is really nice.  If you type "md5sum k" and there are multiple filenames which begin with k in that directory then you can press TAB twice and you will get a list of filenames which start with the letter k. 



#7 pcpunk

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 03:24 PM

This is possibly the easiest way for new Linux users to check md5sum.

1) Navigate to the directory where the file you want to check is located.

2) Right click in an empty space in the window, and select ''Open Terminal Here.''

snapshotKubuntu6_zps13925876.jpeg

3) In the terminal that opens, type ''md5sum'' and the name of the file, then press Return/Enter on your keyboard.

4) Wait for your computer to scan the file, after which it will produce a long number, like the one I have highlighted below.

snapshotKubuntu7_zps6521e7c6.jpeg

That's all there is to it.

This worked, but the "Advanced Option" that you presented after did not work.

 

This option produced nothing?  2) Type ''ls'' and press Return/Enter on the keyboard. This command will list the files in the directory that you are in.

 

And this consequently did not produce anything either?

3) Type ''md5sum'' followed by the first letter, or the first few letters, of the file you want to check. In my case all I have to type is ''md5sum k'' because the file I want to check is the only file in that directory that begins with ''k.'' But if for example I had another file beginning ''ka'' I would have to type ''md5sum ku'' so that the computer knows which of the files beginning with the letter ''k'' I am referring to.


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#8 pcpunk

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 03:25 PM

Autocomplete in Linux is really nice.  If you type "md5sum k" and there are multiple filenames which begin with k in that directory then you can press TAB twice and you will get a list of filenames which start with the letter k. 

This did work and I only pressed Tab once, md5sum check done, thank you all.


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#9 cat1092

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 10:47 PM

Great to hear, pcpunk!  :thumbup2:

 

Now we have a known easy way to check the hashes of files on Linux. Without adding software.

 

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#10 pcpunk

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 07:33 PM

Don't know if I am supposed to open old Threads like this, but correct me if that is the case.

 

I did a md5sum check and it was wrong, omg, can't believe it!  I am quite sure I downloaded it from here: http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=177  From the University of Oklahoma.  I have good internet connection these days and in the future I am going to try DownThemAll as cat1092 has suggested.  Here is the good md5sum from this link: f31365131c20c6a6581aa0f5aae4158a

This is what I got:  

 

o0qst0.png


Edited by pcpunk, 10 December 2014 - 07:39 PM.

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#11 Al1000

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:26 PM

Hi pcpunk,

It looks like you downloaded this one.

EDIT: It looks like you downloaded the right one, as the other one is:

An installation image for manufacturers to pre-install Linux Mint.

Cinnamon OEM


Edited by Al1000, 10 December 2014 - 08:30 PM.


#12 pcpunk

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:59 PM

OMG! I feel like an idiot now, what the heck was I thinking, I already downloaded the OEM also, as I thought I was in the right place, what a waste of time lol.  The upside is that I tried the DownThemAlll that cat has advised me to use more than once.  It's super simple to use and is used by many people.  Thank you so much Al1000.


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 11:08 PM

I haven't used the OEM builds, as I understand, these are primarily for system builders & some of the software that is included in consumer versions of Mint by default (such as the ones that allows us to watch a movie out of the box), are not included in those. 

 

Glad that Al1000 has caught this one. :thumbup2:

 

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#14 NickAu

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 04:42 AM

 

Type ''ls''

Is that an L or an i?

ls


#15 pcpunk

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 09:58 AM

I have to apologize to Al000.  At the time I was still not understanding how to use the terminal.  I just tried the the directions above and they worked flawlessly off course.  But as Nick points out this could have been one of the issues that I failed to recognize (l) not (i).  It's great to learn some of this stuff now that I am more acclimated to Unix/Linux environment, thanks guys for being so patient.


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