Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Mac Vs. Windows (Sandbox/Multi OS discussion)


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Krux

Krux

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:05:19 AM

Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:31 AM

Hi there,

 

I see this sub-section is mostly user's requesting assistance so I hope this is okay.

(Use this forum to discuss, ask questions, and give answers for the operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc.)

 

 

I am a long-time windows user, In fact I can't recall ever using anything else apart from fiddling around with a Macbook Pro at an Apple store.

 

 

I've recently had both my Windows 8 and 8.1 system's infected and have found myself looking into Mac's and Apple's Sandbox app.

 

Being very unfamiliar with Apple products and OS's I was wondering if anybody could give me a run down on how difficult they found the switch and getting used to the new system, I am particularly interested in personal opinions/experiences with the Sandbox app and/or installing and using multiple OS's on a partitioned drive.

 

  • Was the switch easy? For example: Finding an everyday program you need to use like Notepad or Task Manager.

 

  • How did you find the Sandbox App in terms of simplicity, operation, security and malfunctions.

 

  • Did you install multiple OS's onto your Mac? 

If so,

  1. Did you find it difficult or problematic to switch between them?
  2. How was the install process?
  3. Are they difficult to maintain when it comes to security?
  4. What kind of effect (if any) did it have on the proficiency of your system?

 

  • If you have both a Mac and a Windows PC, Which one do you prefer as your main system and why?

 

Thanks in advance for interest - Krux



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:19 PM

Posted 14 July 2014 - 07:00 AM

I don't have time to answer your specific questions this morning as I have to head to work…I will get back to you on those later today or tomorrow.

But, I did want to ask you to clarify something.

What do you mean or think you mean by the "Sandbox App"? I ask because there technically is no such thing.

Do you mean the sandboxing function that is built into the Mac OS and the fact that Apple requires all Apps sold through the Mac App Store to use sandboxing?

 

Or do you in fact mean making use of a third party Virtual Machine program (such as Parallels, VMware Fusion, or VirtualBox) to run other OSs from with in the Mac OS?



#3 Krux

Krux
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:05:19 AM

Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:09 AM

Hi there,

 

 

I did mean the sandboxing function, The sites I read in reference to it appeared to be calling it an App but I seem to have misunderstood, Thank you for point that out :)

 

 

I had not thought it may have been specific to Apps though, I know very little about Mac OS or Apple at all which worries me as my family has caught the 'Apple bug' and have been interested in Macbooks.

PC repair/check-ups are quite expensive so I am normally the one to look at their devices. I was attempting a bit of security research after hearing many positive opinions on Mac's being very difficult to infect/compromise as opposed to Windows OS PC's which bought me to sandbox. The Apple info guides are not too specific (in a user friendly way) and I can't quite grasp it.

 

The question of multi OS's however was a personal one, I know zilch about that other than it is possible.

It made me wonder how simple it would be to set up, and the security outcome of running perhaps a Windows OS as well as a Mac OS.

Would the Windows OS still be able to attract and be compromised by malware/virus even though it is technically built on Mac hardware?

 

 

- Krux 



#4 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:19 PM

Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:49 AM

Hi there,
 
I see this sub-section is mostly user's requesting assistance so I hope this is okay.
(Use this forum to discuss, ask questions, and give answers for the operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc.)
 
 
I am a long-time windows user, In fact I can't recall ever using anything else apart from fiddling around with a Macbook Pro at an Apple store.
 
 
I've recently had both my Windows 8 and 8.1 system's infected and have found myself looking into Mac's and Apple's Sandbox app.
 
Being very unfamiliar with Apple products and OS's I was wondering if anybody could give me a run down on how difficult they found the switch and getting used to the new system, I am particularly interested in personal opinions/experiences with the Sandbox app and/or installing and using multiple OS's on a partitioned drive.

  • Was the switch easy? For example: Finding an everyday program you need to use like Notepad or Task Manager.

Yes and no.

How easy it is to switch will depend on the individual. In general, the Mac OS and Windows are very similar for a lot of things. As the saying goes, "the devil is in the details". While in a general sense, many basic operations are very similar, there are differences on how some things work. And those differences can drive some people crazy.

So, in the end, it is not an easy question to answer as different people will have different experiences with it.

Now, as to finding programs, again that will depend. For "normal", main-stream applications, there should be no problem as most main stream applications have both Mac OS and Windows version. For example, Microsoft Office, Photoshop, etc. For most other "productivity" applications that don't have both Windows and Mac versions, there is usually a Mac equivalent that you can find.

The difficultly gets into dealing with very purpose specific/specialized programs. Sometimes there will not be a Mac equivalent. For example, in the "real world", I am a structural engineer. All my structural engineering programs are all Windows only. There used to be some Mac structural programs, but they are mostly gone. As a result, I have to run Windows for the structural programs.
 

  • How did you find the Sandbox App in terms of simplicity, operation, security and malfunctions.

 


The sandbox function is something that you don't see or really deal with unless you are a developer who wants to sell their programs on the Mac App Store. In other words, as a users, it is just something that "works".

About the only way you will notice it is that Mac App Store apps that are sandboxed have some limitations. For example, you will not find "true" disk utilities in the Mac App Store as sandboxing limits the functionality of such apps. As a result, you still need to get those applications that same way as in the past…i.e. through a third party.
 

 

  • Did you install multiple OS's onto your Mac? 
If so,
  •  
  • Did you find it difficult or problematic to switch between them?
  • How was the install process?
  • Are they difficult to maintain when it comes to security?
  • What kind of effect (if any) did it have on the proficiency of your system?

 

Yes, I have Windows running on my Macs for the reason stated above…i.e. to run my structural engineering software.

It is not difficult for me to switch between the two both practically (i.e. the actual process of switching) as well as dealing with how both do things a little different. In my case, I use Parallels to run Windows in a Virtual Machine. So, this means that Windows is just a "window" in the Mac OS. The other option is to use Boot Camp, which then requires you to reboot the machine to get to the other OS.

In general, the install process for Windows on Mac using either a VM program (such as Parallels) or Boot Camp is not that hard. Boot Camp is likely a bit more work, but it is still pretty easy.

Windows is still Windows when it comes to security. Whether you run it in a VM or in Boot Camp, you will still need to practice the same security precautions as if Windows was running on some Windows computer. In other words, you still need anti-virus/malware programs, be careful what you click on, etc. Generally, speaking, however, Windows malware will NOT transfer from the Windows side of this to the Mac side. The one advantage of running Windows in a VM is that is it REALLY easy to "backup" your Windows install (i.e. you just copy the Windows VM image file to another drive) and most VM programs have the ability to do "snapshot" of Windows that you can revert to…kind of like Windows Restore, but better in many ways.

Windows will run just fine on Mac hardware. If you run it in Boot Camp, then you will lose effectively zero performance compared to similar Windows hardware. The only issue is that Apple does not always provide full driver support for all functions. For example, MacBook Pro computers have dual graphics systems…a more powerful "discrete" graphics and the more battery friendly "integrated" graphics. Apple has drivers in the Mac side to automatically switch between the two, but does not provide the same functionality on for Windows…you are stuck with the more powerful, but battery chugging "discrete" graphics.

If you run Windows in a VM, then you do lose a little bit of performance, especially on the graphics side. But, it is generally something that I don't really notice myself for the things that I do.

 

 

 

  • If you have both a Mac and a Windows PC, Which one do you prefer as your main system and why?
Thanks in advance for interest - Krux

 

I do also have an actual Windows tower in addition to running Windows in VMs on my Macs.

Personally, I like Macs better, but that is likely a function of the fact that I grew up using Macs. I am equally comfortable on Windows, but just prefer the Mac OS. Of course, it helps that generally things like malware are much less of an issue on Macs than on Windows.


Edited by smax013, 14 July 2014 - 10:51 AM.


#5 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:19 PM

Posted 14 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

Hi there,
 
 
I did mean the sandboxing function, The sites I read in reference to it appeared to be calling it an App but I seem to have misunderstood, Thank you for point that out :)
 
 
I had not thought it may have been specific to Apps though, I know very little about Mac OS or Apple at all which worries me as my family has caught the 'Apple bug' and have been interested in Macbooks.
PC repair/check-ups are quite expensive so I am normally the one to look at their devices. I was attempting a bit of security research after hearing many positive opinions on Mac's being very difficult to infect/compromise as opposed to Windows OS PC's which bought me to sandbox. The Apple info guides are not too specific (in a user friendly way) and I can't quite grasp it.
 
The question of multi OS's however was a personal one, I know zilch about that other than it is possible.
It made me wonder how simple it would be to set up, and the security outcome of running perhaps a Windows OS as well as a Mac OS.
Would the Windows OS still be able to attract and be compromised by malware/virus even though it is technically built on Mac hardware?
 
 
- Krux


It is disputed topic as to whether or not the Mac OS is "more secure" than Windows. Different people tend to have different opinions.
The thing that is definite is that the Mac OS has WAY less threats out in the wild than Windows. Personally, at this point, it does not matter if that is because the Mac OS is more secure (as I said, rather debatable) or because malware creators have less incentive to target Macs because they get less "bang for their buck" (so to speak) since there are way fewer Macs than there are Windows computers.

FWIW, I personally run anti-virus software on all my Macs.

Edited by smax013, 14 July 2014 - 12:11 PM.


#6 BeckoningChasm

BeckoningChasm

  • Members
  • 93 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:19 PM

Posted 15 July 2014 - 08:57 AM

I use Mac, Windows 7 Pro, and Windows 8.1 Pro.  The system I use most often is Win 7 Pro.  All of them are similar, all of them do very similar things, it's just a different way of getting to what you want. 

 

It's like moving to a new neighborhood.  You can still get to the grocery store, you just have to take a different route to get there.  One thing I tend to use a lot in Windows is the command prompt, which I don't think has a similar equivalent in Mac (though I may just not have found it yet).

 

In the case of all computers and all OS's, none of them are going to adapt to how you would like to work, you will have to adapt to how they work.  It goes with the territory, :)



#7 Buddyme2

Buddyme2

  • Members
  • 702 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:19 AM

Posted 15 July 2014 - 07:09 PM

One thing I tend to use a lot in Windows is the command prompt, which I don't think has a similar equivalent in Mac (though I may just not have found it yet).

 

Applications > Utilities > Terminal.



#8 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:19 PM

Posted 15 July 2014 - 11:08 PM

One thing I tend to use a lot in Windows is the command prompt, which I don't think has a similar equivalent in Mac (though I may just not have found it yet).

 
Applications > Utilities > Terminal.


As noted, the Terminal program will give you a command prompt. It should be noted that it is a UNIX command prompt in essence as the Mac OS is more or less built off of the BSD kernel.

#9 czbird

czbird

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Local time:02:19 PM

Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:04 AM

Hi Krux,

  I have the IT/IQ somewhere between a house plant and a chimp. I have only been in the Apple Store twice in my life. I have been using Windows OS's since 1997. I currently have Windows 7. Since 2006, whenever I bought a new pc, I would call up the local high school IT department and get one of the their brighter students to set up my new pc which I believed has worked out very well, both technically (what do I know?) and financially. The parents of the HS student I have been using (graduated in 2010) have finally told him he has to move on and get a real job, so he is not readily available and the local HS has stopped teaching IT!

 Back in April of this year, I received an email from a friend warning me about "heartbleed", so I put on my tinfoil hat and started being proactive about learning more about security and such on the internet, which brought to a website called:pcclassesonline.com (it's free) - technically-speaking the website name is accurate,i.e., I have a persoanl computer, however, colloquially-speaking it almost all about teaching about Mac's via youtube. The founder of the website, David A.Cox, refers to himself as "The Mac Guru". However, he is very knowledgeable about IT and has several youtubes to guide a person (or people) on how to migrate Windows to a Mac or how to partition (devote) some of your hard drive and memory safely to Windows OS amongst many other helpful tips in plain language and visual (via youtube) coaching (unless, you want to pay him $200/hr for private lessons). 

  Without getting too long-winded, I would suggest watching some of his youtubes. I have found no other sites (as yet), that walk you the process with ease (KISS principle) and levity.

  I came across BC, after I installed Malwarebytes Premium and Avast Premier and Cleaner (free version). I noticed that after I had Avast clean my pc (only $180 + $30 for software) that they had used everything that was free from this site, such JRT (Junk Removal Tool) and RKill (Root Kill?) and probably some other free downloads. My pc is fine now and I plan on keeping it maintained both with scheduled maintenance and doing it manually (to my capability) as long as I can, then I will probably move over to a Mac

  Don't get me wrong, BC which I discovered about 2 weeks has a plethora of info about just about anything to do with IT and I am  very grateful this site exists. To me it is invaluable to anyone with a question(s) about IT.

  BTW, (just I readjusting my hat) I might also suggest that if you have any questions about a websites security, you can run their domain through ssllabs.com and they will grade it any where from an "A" to "F". bleepingcomputer.com & pcclassesonline.com both received an "A", which IMHO, they set the bar fairly high.  Good Luck ( I have to take a nap). P.S. This is my debut on posting on the internet, so give me a break. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users