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#1 anthony714

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:21 AM

Im having problems with blue screen im new here and i want to learn how to get my computer working again. All it shows is the blue screen but i dont know how to fix it

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#2 SpywareDoc

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 03:13 PM

What is the exact error message on the blue screen?



#3 Arthur.Smith

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 06:09 PM

There aren't any details mentioned here so, here is what is usually wrong in blue screen cases though by the way the error is also commonly known as the ERROR OF DEATH

, just open up your computer, unplug your rams if there are multiple rams unplug them all. Clean them with some cloth, clean the dust inside your computer if there is any. Now plug them both, and start your system and see if the blue screen disappeared, if its still there, then open up your computer again, Now if there are two rams lets suppose you name ram1 'x' and ram '2' y. Unplug ram 'x' first and try running your computer on only y [note:keep x unplugged] and see if it works. If the blue screen is still present unplug y and plug x. see if the blue screen disappeared. Now if your computer worked with x, don't plug y again and if computer works with y don't plug x again.

Note:- If your computer worked with lets suppose x, and you go ahead and plug y again, the ram will damage the motherboard too that will be very more costly. 

If the problem still is there, I strongly recommend you go and visit a professional with your computer, if you don't it will further and greater damage your computer.



#4 Kirbyofdeath

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 10:18 PM

No, most blue screens are not ram related, wiping the contacts may damage the possibly perfect ram chip! Instead, tell me the error code.

 

I strongly recommend you go and visit a professional with your computer, if you don't it will further and greater damage your computer.

Usually no damage will be caused by a blue screen of death, it appears to warn you of a condition that may damage the computer. So a blue screen does not damage your computer, in fact, it actually prevents your computer from damaging itself more.

 

Arthur, who told you that a blue screen is commonly caused by dirty or bad ram? This would just the computer to beep and not boot at all. Who told you that Blue screens will cause further damage? Finally, Many of us are professionals. Many heads are better that one. Especially when fixing computers.


Edited by Kirbyofdeath, 23 July 2014 - 10:27 PM.


#5 Arthur.Smith

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:04 AM

Hahaha.... Kibryo you are just a noob when it comes to this error,  get yourself correct,without proper details we have to assume the worst case to avoid the worst outcome, thats what the experienced do, you should know that a faulty ram also causes a blue screen and if it isn't removed or fixed the fault isn't gonna stay with the ram for long but will transfer to other hardware.

How to Fix a Blue Screen Memory Dump

blue screen memory dump is an error screen that comes up just before the system gets rebooted, because the operating system is no longer able to function properly due to a variety of reasons, and the content of the RAM is dumped on to a data file. This is a frequent problem mainly encountered in various versions of Windows operating system, and is also popularly called the Blue Screen of Death (BSoD).

Fixing a blue screen memory dump will be specific to correcting the error which is displayed on the screen. Sometimes it is difficult to figure out the particular error from the info on the screen, and therefore a broad correction strategy is undertaken to solve the issue. Here are a few steps which address frequently encountered problems in BSoD.

Step 1: Check Recently Installed Hardware and Device Drivers

It has been found that many times BSoD occurs because of a faulty device driver or there is a conflict with the recently installed hardware. In such cases, try the latest version of the driver and reinstall the hardware, but before that make sure the hardware is compatible with your system. To pinpoint the problem, you can use third-party software to disable a recently installed driver and see if the problem is solved. Sometimes the problem also could be that the device driver has not been properly configured to meet the requirements of the system.

Step 2: Repair Your Registry

The second most common cause of BSoD is a Registry that has become corrupted or has a lot of invalid entries. If you are experienced and knowledgeable about the Registry, you can edit it yourself, but this is always a risky proposition, and the best course of action would be to buy special software which automatically scans and fixes problems in the Registry.

Step 3: Check CMOS and Memory Modules

If the error message on the BSoD reads "UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP," then it indicates you have problem with the memory of your computer. You need to check whether the SIMMs (Single Inline Memory Modules) are compatible and have the same speed. Secondly, also check whether you have set the CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) to the right amount of RAM. If these solutions do not work, you might have to replace memory in your computer.

Step 4: Rectify a Damaged Hard Drive 

Sometimes the cause of BSoD is a faulty hard disk. Most Windows operating systems have adiagnostic scan for the hard drive, and you need to run this to figure out the problem. Sometimes the operating system will encounter a problem where it is unable to read from the hard disk, and in such cases apart from the hard disk, you also need to check out the SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) terminator.

Step 5: Scan for Virus 

BSoD problem can also be caused by a virus which has infected crucial files in the hard drive that might disrupt the flow of information between the operating system and hard drive. If you have already installed antivirus software, you might have to scan your computer with a new one.

 

So the topic starter guy, either you give some detail, or you follow my advice and go visit a professional, or you you just assume that it will be all okay,  follow this death guy, Good Luck the call is yours!

And the death guy, sorry if it offended you, if the blue screen didn't do some major damage to you it doesn't mean that the starter guy will be just as lucky.


Edited by Arthur.Smith, 24 July 2014 - 07:13 AM.


#6 Kirbyofdeath

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:35 PM

No, No, I can tell you are an amateur when it comes to this. Not only do I have more experience and posts, but you didn't even realize the difference between a Win95 to Win ME bsod and a WinNT and up bsod, In Win 95 up until Windows ME, A bsod is equivalent to an error message, you just need to press a button to exit back. Win NT and up has a bsod screen that requires the computer to be restarted. The OP's computer is a Win 95/98/ME, meaning it is a recoverable blue screen A.K.A a BLUE SCREEN ERROR, not a bsod. And about the computer damage thing, It is possible, But in over hundreds of BSoDs, I've only seen two cases where damage was caused after a bsod. Finally, "noob" is a horrible word choice in a professional conversation. If you mean "Newbie", than you are wrong. I can obviously tell you have no experience in Win 95/98/ME (you are giving instructions for a WinNT or up os) while me, my first computer was a windows 95.

 

 

you should know that a faulty ram also causes a blue screen and if it isn't removed or fixed the fault isn't gonna stay with the ram for long but will transfer to other hardware.

 

 

Who told you that??? Honestly that sounds like bullcrap, how will a fault transfer to other devices??

 

 

Trust Me, us here at Bleeping Computer know how to fix this, calling someone names like "noob" can really make someone angry.


Edited by Kirbyofdeath, 24 July 2014 - 06:41 PM.


#7 Arthur.Smith

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 06:32 AM

Oh well my first computer had a windows 95 too

 

No, No, I can tell you are an amateur when it comes to this. Not only do I have more experience and posts, but you didn't even realize the difference between a Win95 to Win ME bsod and a WinNT and up bsod, In Win 95 up until Windows ME, A bsod is equivalent to an error message, you just need to press a button to exit back. Win NT and up has a bsod screen that requires the computer to be restarted. The OP's computer is a Win 95/98/ME, meaning it is a recoverable blue screen A.K.A a BLUE SCREEN ERROR, not a bsod. And about the computer damage thing, It is possible, But in over hundreds of BSoDs, I've only seen two cases where damage was caused after a bsod. Finally, "noob" is a horrible word choice in a professional conversation. If you mean "Newbie", than you are wrong. I can obviously tell you have no experience in Win 95/98/ME (you are giving instructions for a WinNT or up os) while me, my first computer was a windows 95.

 

 

you should know that a faulty ram also causes a blue screen and if it isn't removed or fixed the fault isn't gonna stay with the ram for long but will transfer to other hardware.

 

 

Who told you that??? Honestly that sounds like bullcrap, how will a fault transfer to other devices??

 

 

Trust Me, us here at Bleeping Computer know how to fix this, calling someone names like "noob" can really make someone angry.

oh well don't take hard new guy,  noob is not necessarily a bad word, but I would say bullcrap is, well anyway, you say I am amateur and you are experienced, well I won't like to argue on that, and as I said I was sorry if it offended you at the very least, so just chill out dude, I was just warning him for the dangers since  I have seen numerous cases of that, and believe me it costs a lot when you have custom built specially for gaming. My assumption for you being a noob, well I am sorry about that, and the instructions, I was just telling you, what I told him was only in the first post, meeting a professional that is. 

Without any details, that was the best option to give, if you have a different opinion that is your opinion. Since we all are doing Value Judgement here, let me give my opinion too, you know calling people what you called me make them angry too, but don't worry first it was my fault for provoking you and second I don't get mad this early. So just post something to tell me we are clear.

By the way I am new to this site. But believe me it means I was somewhere all these years doing something, like maybe blogging, or I may happen to run a handful of blogs. Oh well, it was about the guys problem, and we made it our...haha 



#8 Kirbyofdeath

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 11:22 AM

Trust me, I am a professional of sorts. I've fixed more computers that wouldn't even start up than you have fixed blue screens. We cannot give any instructions on what to do just yet, sending a computer for a repair job could be a costly mistake for something as small as misconfigured programs.

 

 don't take hard new guy

This always cracks me up, others calling me "noob" or "new guy" without even looking at my post count or join date.

 

By the way, if someone calls another a  "noob" then most people will guess who the real noob is, so I prefer to say "newbie".

 

Well, lets just try to work together to fixthe OP's problem.


Edited by Kirbyofdeath, 29 July 2014 - 11:22 AM.


#9 PepsiFC

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:25 PM

Hahaha.... Kibryo you are just a noob when it comes to this error,  get yourself correct,without proper details we have to assume the worst case to avoid the worst outcome, thats what the experienced do, you should know that a faulty ram also causes a blue screen and if it isn't removed or fixed the fault isn't gonna stay with the ram for long but will transfer to other hardware.

How to Fix a Blue Screen Memory Dump

 

blue screen memory dump is an error screen that comes up just before the system gets rebooted, because the operating system is no longer able to function properly due to a variety of reasons, and the content of the RAM is dumped on to a data file. This is a frequent problem mainly encountered in various versions of Windows operating system, and is also popularly called the Blue Screen of Death (BSoD).

Fixing a blue screen memory dump will be specific to correcting the error which is displayed on the screen. Sometimes it is difficult to figure out the particular error from the info on the screen, and therefore a broad correction strategy is undertaken to solve the issue. Here are a few steps which address frequently encountered problems in BSoD.

Step 1: Check Recently Installed Hardware and Device Drivers

It has been found that many times BSoD occurs because of a faulty device driver or there is a conflict with the recently installed hardware. In such cases, try the latest version of the driver and reinstall the hardware, but before that make sure the hardware is compatible with your system. To pinpoint the problem, you can use third-party software to disable a recently installed driver and see if the problem is solved. Sometimes the problem also could be that the device driver has not been properly configured to meet the requirements of the system.

Step 2: Repair Your Registry

The second most common cause of BSoD is a Registry that has become corrupted or has a lot of invalid entries. If you are experienced and knowledgeable about the Registry, you can edit it yourself, but this is always a risky proposition, and the best course of action would be to buy special software which automatically scans and fixes problems in the Registry.

Step 3: Check CMOS and Memory Modules

If the error message on the BSoD reads "UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP," then it indicates you have problem with the memory of your computer. You need to check whether the SIMMs (Single Inline Memory Modules) are compatible and have the same speed. Secondly, also check whether you have set the CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) to the right amount of RAM. If these solutions do not work, you might have to replace memory in your computer.

Step 4: Rectify a Damaged Hard Drive 

Sometimes the cause of BSoD is a faulty hard disk. Most Windows operating systems have adiagnostic scan for the hard drive, and you need to run this to figure out the problem. Sometimes the operating system will encounter a problem where it is unable to read from the hard disk, and in such cases apart from the hard disk, you also need to check out the SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) terminator.

Step 5: Scan for Virus 

BSoD problem can also be caused by a virus which has infected crucial files in the hard drive that might disrupt the flow of information between the operating system and hard drive. If you have already installed antivirus software, you might have to scan your computer with a new one.

 

So the topic starter guy, either you give some detail, or you follow my advice and go visit a professional, or you you just assume that it will be all okay,  follow this death guy, Good Luck the call is yours!

And the death guy, sorry if it offended you, if the blue screen didn't do some major damage to you it doesn't mean that the starter guy will be just as lucky.

 

Nope, a faulty RAM would cause a beep when trying to boot your computer.






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