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How to calibrate LED monitor?


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#1 Dave Finlay

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:12 AM

Here's the monitor in question, a 24' BenQ GL2460:

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824014377

 

I do video editing, and have gotten some flak on other message boards for investing in this monitor, mostly due to it being TN rather than IPS. Then again I'm not a professional editor, and was looking for the right balance between price and quality, which I saw in this monitor. *shrug* Anyways, I'd like to see if I could make the most out of this monitor by calibrating it, as its default settings are less than stellar. Could anybody recommend me any programs or methods for doing so? Thanks.



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#2 czarboom

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:42 AM

NIVIDA which I think is your graphics card has a few test screens in it.

 

To start go into control panel,

go to the appearance and personalize tab,

Click Display

Select Calibrate Color.

 

Follow the screen and text.

 

Remember due to light, viewing distance and angle each perfect calibration is in the eye of the user.  Just like with a LED tv,

Here is a good starting guide by CNET.com

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-calibrate-your-monitor/

 

cz


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#3 ruben_carmona

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 04:15 AM

 

Remember due to light, viewing distance and angle each perfect calibration is in the eye of the user.  Just like with a LED tv,

 

Calibration is never in the eye of the user. Our eyes, or our brain, will always make a balance of whites and colors corresponding the ambient light.

To calibrate a screen correctly, you need a sensor (like Spyder and i1) that will measure your screen objectively.

 

I do that with spyder4pro and its software. Also on a LED-Backlight monitor (Samsung).



#4 czarboom

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 01:28 AM

 

Calibration is never in the eye of the user. Our eyes, or our brain, will always make a balance of whites and colors corresponding the ambient light.

To calibrate a screen correctly, you need a sensor (like Spyder and i1) that will measure your screen objectively.

 

I do that with spyder4pro and its software. Also on a LED-Backlight monitor (Samsung).

 

 

What is digital or technically correct and what we like and think is correct are always based on what we think is perfect.   I know this from years of Digital Imaging in medical repair, and what I see from professionals and what I know is correct.

Meaning, I can run the perfect calibration on a Radiologist's viewer (10Mega Pixel Monitor), done to the modality and specifications outlined by the manufacture in a dark room with perfect contrast, balance, resolution etc. etc. 

My experience of this, is around 95% of the Dr's will say it is not correct and change it.  That is why they each have a user profile and set their own image calibrations up and learn how to change them. 

You confuse what are eyes can process with what we like and want, and that is always in the user not the device.  Most LED TVs and monitors have the same complaint, "it never looks like it did in the store, and the TV/Monitor looks off."

I or you could show the user that its 100% correct with whatever tool you want.  But that does not change the fact that it’s the eye of the user.... (Eye meaning the mind of the user not the physical eye) that wants something different.

Factors that can influence this are but not limited to,

  • ambient light
  • size of screen
  • distance from screen
  • age of user
  • blood pressure
  • do they wear glasses
  • mental and physical issues with the user
  • service being used on the screen (blue ray, games, text reader, etc)
  • on and on

Overall what looks good to me, might be crap to you, or someone else.  That is why there are never any manufacture settings that claims "perfect calibrations".  So while the tool might work it will never overcome the wants and needs of the user. 

Lastly, our eyes and brains do not pick up all light there is.  Meaning we cannot see infrared light, or gamma etc.  That being the case when you flood the eye with blue light (95% of all screens use blue light) it changes the way users perceive the images and add a time component to that can really give us all types of problems like eye strain, sleep issues, headaches on and on.

Remember our eyes are not meant to work in the medium of air; they were made to work underwater, that is why our eyes are incased in a fluid to allow focusing of objects.  So all that we see in the medium of air is only as good as we can see now, not ever.


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#5 ruben_carmona

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 02:58 AM

That might be true for a doctor that prefers seeing his graphs blue instead of red. But in terms of photography that's not true.

 

When editing photos you want to see them how they come out in the prints. If you adjust your monitor to how you "like" it. You might be happy working on it, but not for long if you see that your prints look completely different....

So therefore, a calibration with a sensor is inevitable.



#6 czarboom

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 01:06 AM

 

When editing photos you want to see them how they come out in the prints. If you adjust your monitor to how you "like" it. You might be happy working on it, but not for long if you see that your prints look completely different....

So therefore, a calibration with a sensor is inevitable.

I would agree but in medical imaging that has already been addressed, and it allows for the correction of that very same issue. 

 

Again, "graphs blue instead of red" is not what I or most do in medial imaging, we doing MRIs, Xrays Ultrasounds... where the colors really matter.  Motion is deticted in a Ultrasound by color scaling and blah.. blah of topic.

I digress...

So in an image like a Xray, there is a RAW image and a PROCESSED image.  The raw being the true image, the processed being the image with adjustments made and both can be displayed but usually it’s the processed or "for presentation" image that is viewed by the Dr reading the image. 

 

Some Dr's want a contrast heavy image, some want true color, somewhat weird crap.  At the end of the day your perception, mine are different.  And no matter how great the image is in the RAW or original form, your view of what looks good, what works well, and what allows you to do your job for long hours might never be the settings given by the manufacture of the monitor, Windows, or any DVD or program. 

 

Again it might be true shade of blue to you that seems great.  It might not work for me, most devices and settings will change light blue as I change my true blue to a lighter shade.  And blah blah... you get the point.  That is why digital imaging in all parts caught on so fast.  It allowed in part for better images, and for you the user to adjust the image as needed for your viewing.  It also allows for a better image from an original image, e.g. contrast, shading, gamma, on and on.

 

Again, no tool has been invented or works well enough for a one size fits all.  If there way Microsoft or Apple would own it and have it in all devices... Windows does some of it, but gives NVIDA etc the ability to install their own tools for correction.


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#7 czarboom

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 01:08 AM

Forgot to mention, I agree with you that what the tool says it technically correct, and have had this argument in person with many Dr's and Image Specialists but that is a circle argument and I give up because.... o hey it’s a fly over there... wait what were we talking about..


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#8 Datcoolguy

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 12:05 PM

Anyways, back to the topic at hand, most people on message boards will still give you flak no matter what you do, also don't forget they don't have their monitors all showing the same image, since not one of them has the same calibration and surroundings than the other, so there's no "perfect calibration" there's just what you think it's right, softwares only let you calibrate it as you like according to the stuff they show on the screen, the real professionals use sensors to do first time calibration, but users will always meddle in the settings afterward because they light a little more contrast, or more brightness.

 

Either way, it's up to you buddy, if people at the message boards don't like your work, tell them to do it themselves!

 

EDIT: Sleepy grammar mistakes op!


Edited by Datcoolguy, 27 July 2014 - 09:21 PM.

"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#9 Joe C

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 06:49 PM

You can use these on line test images, it may help

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/






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