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Judge orders unmasking of Amazon.com “negative” reviewers


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 08:41 PM

While surfing a few sites today I came across this story.
 
Quote.

"Judge orders unmasking of Amazon.com “negative” reviewers
A federal judge has granted a nutritional supplement firm's request to help it learn the identities of those who allegedly left "phony negative" reviews of its products on Amazon.com."
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/07/judge-orders-unmasking-of-amazon-com-negative-reviewers/
 
Now I am in a bit of a dilemma here, While I disagree with the judges decision, I do think that if you are going to make any public comments like that, good or bad, You should be willing to back them up, By letting people know who you are. When I have a problem with something I go to the company that made it or in the case of my Avast subscription,AVAST - Your Subscription Has Successfully Renewed. RipOFF  I first went to my bank, Regardless of the situation If I complain, I always have screenshots, Photos, and any other documents needed to prove my case and always provide contact details, In almost every case a company rep has contacted me to see " what they can do to help".

 

What do you think?



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#2 czarboom

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 01:47 AM

a do agree, but if they do the negative reviews, they need to unmask the companies that post fake positive reviews.  Because Amazon is filled with them.  Look up something like a diet product or hair loss or any supplement or something like that.  Then look at the reviews and click on other reviews by that user. 

Its usually something like, a few text books, some music and a belt or something random like that. 

 

So it should go both ways, fake bad and good ones. 


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#3 cat1092

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:08 AM

The reviewing system is part of why I no longer shop at Amazon. This is what they do. 

 

For instance, a line of routers, the model numbers may vary a bit. There may be one or two good ones in the lot. 

 

However, Amazon (& Newegg is doing this too) is taking all of the reviews & lumping into one. 

 

For example, a router just released last week, would appear to many Amazon customers as being reviewed hundreds, if not thousands of times. 

 

Same with HDD & SSD's, the sizes are lumped together on both sites. Anyone who knows SSD's, knows that the smaller ones are a little slower, in real time & in benchmarks (most of the time). These companies are too lazy to separate reviews, or are stacking them in their favor. 

 

There needs to be transparency & honesty in product reviews. This leaves customers in the position of Google searching 3rd party sites to get the facts on a given model. I don't take the word of the retailers blindly on these things & do my own research before purchase. 

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 Joe C

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 08:13 PM

Not a good idea generally to use reviews from places that sell that product....It will be skewed because they are selling that product. Search on line for reviews from non-product supported sites, As an example, Johny Guru is one place to use for honest reviews for power supplies....

http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Review_Cat&recatnum=13

 

It's not always going to be easy finding reputable reviews for your future purchase, so you may end up putting in some extra effort



#5 cat1092

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 11:50 PM

I've noticed that some of Newegg's hardware has the JonnyGuru recommended tag, though it's still best to manually check. 

 

That's why I waited a bit before purchasing my last PC, wanted to see some 3rd party reviews. Turned out that the Dell XPS 8700 is a highly configurable PC, unlike their old school offerings, these contains Intel components that doesn't require 3rd party adapters to connect simple accessories, such as GPU's, CPU coolers, etc. Removed the original HDD & added two SSD's & a 500GB WD RE4 that was onhand, have added an upgraded GPU, all with no troubles. 

 

The reason I was hesitant, it took a lot of effort (& some luck) to perform simple upgrades on an earlier model. Went through several hoops just to install a basic Intel CPU fan/heatsink combo. I didn't want to walk into that again. 

 

It's also best not to rely on 3rd party reviews in publications where the hardware OEM spends a lot of advertising dollars. Because it's going to be fairly hard for a reviewer (an employee of the publisher) to give an honest assessment of a crappy computer, if say that OEM is paying for full back cover ads. 

 

Fortunately, Google (& Bing) can help to hunt down independent reviews of products. Many of which are from those whom purchased the product or service. I've been selected several times to review products by different online sites, as well as the site who sold the product. 

 

Tom's Hardware is also a good place to find reviews for many types of computer hardware. So is SSD/GPU/CPU Boss, one can compare different ones. Another valuable source is the OEM forums, if say a particular computer model isn't up to par, there will be lots of customers asking for assistance with issues. Look for consistency. Some models will become notorious for GPU issues & will be posted for the world to see.  

 

It all depends on what one is looking for. Being that this is a site that deals primarily with computers, is why I'm using these as examples. The same would apply to home appliances, vehicles & most anything consumers purchases. 

 

However, I don't trust the Amazon reviewing system, in all honesty I feel that eBay's is more transparent. There, one can see detailed customer feedback on sellers. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 02 August 2014 - 11:52 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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