Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

windows 2003 server moving to different hardware


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 blackturbo

blackturbo

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 10 July 2014 - 10:24 AM

Hi all,

 

 I have to move a windows 2003 server to new hardware over the next week. To answer the first question in your mind (why are you still using server 2003) , because it works for us perfectly for what we are doing with it. Ive been researching on the best tools to use. Can this be accomplished using the built in NTbackup? , or we have a software called "Drive image"  . I need to hear some opinions of how other people would do it and keep it low cost. Thanks!

 

Mark



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 sflatechguy

sflatechguy

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,226 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:38 AM

Posted 11 July 2014 - 01:14 PM

NTbackup backs up your server so you can recover to an earlier state if something catastrophic happens.

You could clone or image the drive(s) on the server. The trick is to make sure that the new hardware box is identical to the configuration you had on the old server -- motherboard, RAM, CPU etc. Putting an image from one setup onto the hard drive of a different set of hardware will likely result in performance issues. There are a number of tools that will allow you to image the disk, from Clonezilla (free) to paid third-party tools. You could also take the disk image and migrating and installing it as a virtual machine.



#3 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,116 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:07:38 AM

Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:07 PM

There are several imaging programs that allow you to recover to different hardware. I have used acronis true image. What type of server are you moving is this a domain controller or just a file server? You may want to setup the servers indepentdantly then move only the data. Remember Microsoft OEM licensing ties the server license to the original server so be careful.
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#4 blackturbo

blackturbo
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:21 PM

this is just a file server. iam moving it to another machine for a backup server. so we have another machine ready when the server goes down (14 year old compant proliant ml220) it doesnt get updated alot. its running win 2003 server. I do have another windows 2003 license so i can set them up indenpentdantly ,



#5 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,116 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:07:38 AM

Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:45 PM

Are you on a domain? If you going to set it up as a backup you could always run both servers and use DFS to keep copies on both servers. That being said If its just a file server, set the server up, copy the files over and keep it current with the newest files. Are you keeping the old server as primary or backup?  I suggest setting the servers up independantly becuase it saves on the cost of software just to image the one server to another. That being said In my experience NT backup isnt that robust and I would recomend with the new server you change to a different backup software such as Symantec Backup Exec, Acronis True Image, or Carbonite server. 


Edited by Sneakycyber, 12 July 2014 - 05:46 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#6 blackturbo

blackturbo
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:35 AM

no iam not on a domain. this is just a small network with a server, and probally 5-6 xp workstations. I like the suggestion of doing it indepantly , I was looking at acronis backups, and is this the one you would get?

 

https://kb.acronis.com/content/1529

 

sounds like i can make a backup server pretty easily without using ntback and fooling with the ASR and making a floppy disk :)



#7 JohnnyJammer

JohnnyJammer

  • Members
  • 1,117 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:QLD Australia
  • Local time:09:38 PM

Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:56 PM

If its just a file server, why not just use a Windows 7 machine and a shared folder and maybe shared printers?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users