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Where are my dns numbers?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 wtfer

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 01:42 AM

All the information I find on getting them is outdated!

 

There are 3 different number for DNS, isn't there supposed to be just two, why is there 3?

or are the DND numbers under IPv4?

or are they under Default Gateway?

 

pic I thook of Ipconfig/all

 

http://i5.minus.com/iD4bhqjABpWvy.png


Edited by hamluis, 10 July 2014 - 11:18 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking - Hamluis.


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#2 SleepyDude

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:02 AM

Hi,

 

It's good to have more than one DNS server in case one fail to respond windows will query the next one.


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#3 czarboom

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 01:36 AM

DNS will have 3 sets of numbers

1. Is the Primary DNS

2. Is the Secondary DNS

3. Is usually the DNS that is the same number as your gateway.  This is because your Router is set to make the DNS calls for your network.  Its a typical thing and is a private IP for your side of the Network.  Meaning say the DNS and gateway is 192.168.0.1  (can be anything like that) This IP is not a real IP for the rest of the world, is reserved as a Private IP for internal network use only.  So you can have a device on 192.168.1.xxx (xxx being any number to 254 with a few exceptions).  and I could also have the same IP for a device, and 10million other could as well.

But that does not mean that is your IP to the world outside of your network.  Because IPs cannot be the same, or this thing called the Internet would not work. 

This is a basic overview, it goes down hill fast from here. 

 

Hope that helps you out.

cz


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#4 Kilroy

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 08:44 AM

You can have more than two DNS servers, normally you only get two, but you can have more.  There is an order that is used to resolve domain names.  I recommend against using your router as a DNS server as most home routers do not have sufficient resources to perform properly, they work, but a real DNS server will give you better performance.  You can use the DNS Benchmark from GRC to see what DNS servers give you the best response times.


Edited by Kilroy, 12 July 2014 - 08:45 AM.


#5 czarboom

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 02:58 AM

Kilroy,

Good tip, and nice site for DNS and usage benchmarks.  With routers I can agree, the DNS cache is usually a issue, it does in most cases not like to let go of the entries and negative entries most of all.

 

wtfer

You can learn more about using items such as DNSMASQ, and how to change and configure the DNS on the router for LAN (again if you choose) by going to DNSMASQ

 

I know a bunch of info, but take it a bit at a time, and then go to RFC 1035 to learn about the basic DNS info.

Then go to Technet RFC List for DNS entries found here. then go to the listed sites to look up the DNS items you need to learn more about.

 

cz


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