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Can skilled hackers plant stuff on my comp w/o a trace?


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#1 StalkedbyHackers

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:21 PM

 I got myself involved in a situation straight out of a bad movie. I won't get into details because if I told you the full story many would shake their heads in disbelief. Sadly my luck is that bad. Anyway I've been hitlisted as I was told and I had some other chilling messages from the people trying to destroy my life. Can if they are skilled enough (and at this point picture the best of the best) either plant things on my computer like child porn or if I leave my computer on can they manipulate my computer in such a way that they could make it seem like it was me clicking on whatever sites? The fact I'm hitlisted means they will use any and all means at their disposal to ruin my life.


Edited by hamluis, 09 July 2014 - 12:25 PM.
Moved from MRL to Gen Security - Hamluis.


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#2 palerider2

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 06:35 PM

Hi, the answer is yes.

Can you describe in outline your hardware and software ?

You have a security problem, not necessarily something that should ruin your life. But it needs dealing with, for sure.

That includes flattenng the PC.

Edited by palerider2, 09 July 2014 - 06:36 PM.


#3 wpgwpg

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 07:59 PM

 Are you behind a hardware & software firewall?  Do you have strong passwords that you change at regular intervals?  Do you have good antivirus and antimalware programs?  If the answer is no to any of those, you're taking unnecessary risks.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#4 Crazy Cat

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:01 PM

Yes, it's called a Logic bomb. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_bomb
 

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. ― Albert Einstein ― Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

 

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#5 NickAu

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:03 PM

Hi, the answer is yes.

 

You need to audit your surfing, chat, websites you visit, You need good security, You may need to change ip.

Would need more details, such as where this threat originates from, Maybe who these people are, Are they associated with some forum, Is it an angry ex partner, How much do they know about PC's and stuff.

 

There are things that can be done to secure that PC, Windows users can help here, The biggest problem with PC security is the user and their surfing habits.


Edited by NickAu1, 10 July 2014 - 08:06 PM.


#6 StalkedbyHackers

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:09 PM

I was told I was reported to homeland security now. This is what im scared of if that is the case and they planted something, or hijacked my identity, or made me say something I never said. These people are trying to get me thrown in jail that is their strategy. Now if they did report me to DHS after planting bleep would an agent be at my door by now? I've never been more scared in my life. I've made a lot of political comments nothing anyone else doesn't say on a million blogs or sites, but I'm really concerned now that they did something. Can computer forensics people prove I'm innocent if that was the case?

 

I have been made into an internet celeb on a political site in some circles due to the hackers. I recently went to the FBI out of desperation and I filed my complaint on my compromised computer. Well the hackers who have been stalking me since late August of last year I guess spread the word around so now I have a hacker jihad on my hands. It stemmed from comments I made on youtube and political sites. When I bought a new computer I was on some internet site I visit often and someone starts typing into this random chat bar thingy on the side (this is not a registered chat thingy it was a movie site) hehehe I win the internet I tracked you down through your I.P. I have been messing with the hackers too for a long time I type random gibberish into yahoo and google search engines, the problem is they or made my computer repost everything on this one political site or have some kind of link or facebook page up. That community wants my head on a pike even though I never posted a single thing on their site my audience was the hackers. I typed some crazy stuff but it was through yahoo or google search I never intended it for get re posted anywhere. Now they said they reported me to DHS. My comments were directed at the hackers and not for another audience. I also believe they did other things and manipulated my computer. On my old computer things used to get moved or icons renamed often. Can I prove it wasn't me? I've lost sleep over this and I'm actually scared as hell.


Edited by StalkedbyHackers, 10 July 2014 - 08:22 PM.


#7 NickAu

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:25 PM

Can computer forensics people prove I'm innocent if that was the case?

Most Likley yes.
 

I've made a lot of political comments nothing anyone else doesn't say on a million blogs or sites,

I wouldnt worry too much about that, Unless you threatened The president or an act of terrorism. Even if they did report you, HomeLand security is not stupid, They will look into it, You have done nothing wrong they will drop the case fast, I doubt they would even bother to talk to you.
 
I am a Linux user and The NSA thinks Linux Journal is an “extremist forum”?     I am a member on a few Linux sites and have made political jokes etc, Do I care? No, Why? Because I am a nobody and don't care I have done nothing that would get me in trouble, I am just exercising my right to free speech, and freedom of the press by reading what I want when I want, And if that upsets somebody too bleeping bad.

 

@ NSA can you please tell the helicopter pilot over my house to back off it's frightening the chickens and that means no eggs, The black van up the road is ok for now, Just look out if it rains that spot is a bit boggy.



#8 Crazy Cat

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:44 PM

If you want to audit your operating system for changes then use http://www.openioc.org

Run on a USB thumb drive, and it will take a complete audit snapshot. When running the audit for the second time, you can compare what has changed.

Using this USB thumb drive, I'll be able to audit many PCs.
 

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. ― Albert Einstein ― Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

 

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#9 NickAu

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:48 PM

 

I was on some internet site I visit often

Yup they get your ip that way.  It also sounds as if your PC, and or router may be hacked. Firstly I think you need to address this, Clean up your PC and router, The Malware Response Team can help there. Then you need a new Ip address and finally, Never go to those sites again.

 

Once everything is clean we can see about locking that PC down a bit. This applies to ANY PC's on your home network.


Edited by NickAu1, 10 July 2014 - 08:49 PM.


#10 cat1092

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:53 PM

 Are you behind a hardware & software firewall?  Do you have strong passwords that you change at regular intervals?  Do you have good antivirus and antimalware programs?  If the answer is no to any of those, you're taking unnecessary risks.

 

This is the solution. 

 

A good Firewall won't let intruders in. At home, you need to be behind both types of Firewalls, in public you need a strong software one. I use Emsisoft Online Armor Firewall, rather than the Windows one, every event is recorded. You can try it for 30 days with no risk or obligation.                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

http://www.emsisoft.com/en/software/oa/

 

It's not Free, but it's among the best software Firewalls around & like most every other product, you get what you pay for. There are discounts on renewals each year. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 NickAu

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 09:03 PM

Windows 7 has a good firewall pre installed.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 09:32 PM

Windows 7 has a good firewall pre installed.

 

It does, but this type of situation calls for the big guns. On the first day of using Online Armor, I got more prompts to allow or deny than the entire time (going on 5 years) of Windows 7 Firewall prompts. Normally those prompts would be when connecting to a new network. 

 

OA will fairly much ask about everything the first few days. Yes, it's a royal pain, but the OP has a unique situation on hand. Maximum protection (at the moment) is my recommendation, given what the OP is reporting to us. And there's a 30 day Trial, during which all features are up & running. 

 

Though this has a large part to do with what's going on. 

 

 

 

The biggest problem with PC security is the user and their surfing habits.

 

Nothing to debate on there. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 technonymous

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 12:23 AM

Well for starters don't say or hang your dirty laundry out for all to see on blogs. E-mail is like the best place to get infected. I think you need to get the security team to take a look at whats running on your pc if anything. After that change passwords to everything you use on the net. Get a strong Anti-Virus software suite like COMODO that protects your e-mail as well. Furthermore, Comodo also gives away completely free E-mail crypto certificate signatures that are good for 1 year.


Edited by technonymous, 16 July 2014 - 12:24 AM.


#14 cat1092

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 12:41 AM

 

 

Well for starters don't say or hang your dirty laundry out for all to see on blogs. 

 

Without the information, we cannot determine the issue. Secondly, we all can see what's done by the security team, but regular members cannot respond. This is how the community works, in the open. Thirdly, we're BleepingComputer.com, not a blog, but rather one of the largest self help site in the World. 

 

If a person needs one on one advise, it's best to get this diagnosis & repair in private. However, the OP didn't ask for that, 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 technonymous

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 04:40 AM

 

 

 

Well for starters don't say or hang your dirty laundry out for all to see on blogs. 

 

Without the information, we cannot determine the issue. Secondly, we all can see what's done by the security team, but regular members cannot respond. This is how the community works, in the open. Thirdly, we're BleepingComputer.com, not a blog, but rather one of the largest self help site in the World. 

 

If a person needs one on one advise, it's best to get this diagnosis & repair in private. However, the OP didn't ask for that, 

 

Cat

 

Well it's late I'm sorry I could of worded that better. I wasn't referring to BC in particular. Yes, I know info is needed to fix the PC problem here at BC. I was suggesting stopping those other communications and e-mails. What I meant to say, was that to much info out on the net elsewhere in general can be damaging. It's called social hacking.






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