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Quick Question About Air Compression Cleaning.


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Maxey243

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 07:22 AM

Hello and thank you for taking the time to read this post. 

 

What seems to be the Question/Problem?

 

I really think that my computer needs a clean as it is getting very dusty and dirty inside the case. Obviously some of this dust and dirt is going to get onto the inside components such as the motherboard, GPU etc. I was watching a short YouTube video on the best way to clean the inside of the computer from dust and things alike. The person said to use a can of compressed air to clean away the dust and bits that have gotten into the case. I don't have one of these cans of compressed air, I do however have an air compressor [See image for a picture of one similar to mine].

 

I was wondering if I could use this and if it would do the same job as the can of compressed air. I'm not sure if the air from the air compressor is going to be too powerful and damage the motherboard or any other component. What do you guys think, can I use the air compressor I have or no?

 

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#2 badr0b0t

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 07:54 AM

If you have a way to regulate the air, I don't see why not. Just do a research on what psi level you should keep the air pressure. And make sure your moisture trap is working well. You don't wanna blow water into your PC. But those cans of compressed only costs around $5 or so. You can grab them from Staples. They normally have good deals on bundles of cans. So if you can avoid using your industrial type compressor, avoid it or use it at your own risk.


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#3 Maxey243

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 07:56 AM

Okay thank you, I may as well just invest in some can of compressed air. 



#4 buddy215

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 08:27 AM

Well, unless the person using the compressor is a total klutz and banging the nozzle around inside the

computer....I know of no legitimate reason not to use a compressor.

Of course, you would want to set the compressor to around 50 to 75 pounds...don't want to blow it off the table.

A plastic nozzle would be preferable to a metal one. But with a little care not to touch anything...metal would be fine.

Make sure the power is off and look carefully after cleaning for any visible moisture and as a further precaution

wait a half hour or so for any moisture to evaporate. You can get moisture from those cans of compressed air, too!

 

The same precautions you would use with a can of compressed air apply with using a compressor.

I find that using a Q tip works great for cleaning, too. Especially beneath the fan atop the CPU and dislodging

any grime that the air has trouble with.


Edited by buddy215, 08 July 2014 - 08:29 AM.

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#5 ElfBane

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 08:28 AM

The exit pressure of canned air is ~75psi. So, if you can regulate that air compressor that low, it should work.



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 08:30 AM

When you clean the computer with compressed air, make sure you block the fans from spinning. You don't want to overspin the fans and spinning the fans with the computer off can create a back current which isn't very good for the motherboard.

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/cleaning-the-inside-of-your-pc/#fans

 

 

 

  1. CPU fan and heatsink
  2. This is the most important part of the cooling system - dirt collects on the fan blades and clogs the heatsink vanes. Use the paintbrush to brush the dirt off each blade and off the heatsink vanes if accessible. Using the pencil to hold the fan blades still, blow out the fan and the heatsink with the compressed air. It is important not to let the CPU fan (or other fans) spin up under the air blast as damaging voltages can be generated through a dynamo effect. Expect significant dirt to be ejected from the CPU heatsink. If you want to be particularly thorough moisten a Cotton-tip with glass cleaning fluid and wipe down the upper and lower surface of each fan blade.

 

 

 



#7 zingo156

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 08:59 AM

I tend to suggest 40psi with most compressor nozzels. The otherthing I have used is a vacuum in reverse (blower mode) if your vacuum has this option, with a little nozzel attachment. Vacuum's won't blow liquid unless for some reason you have it vacuuming liquid at the time you are cleaning the computer. Anything that moves air will work but as stated a water trap is recommended for air compressors.


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#8 old rocker

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 09:02 AM

Most air compressors will make condensation along with making air to clean your computer. This should be taken into consideration when using an air compressor. Just as you don't want to turn the can of compressed air upside down when cleaning your computer. If your compressor has a dryer fire away making sure you don't use pressure much above 60psig..



#9 Bezukhov

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 09:15 AM

I disguise my heat sinks as microphones and stick them in front of a politician just as he is about to give a speech. All that hot air does wonders to get them clean.
To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#10 GreenGiant117

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:37 PM

Unplug any fans before blowing it out, when still plugged in but not powered and spinning they will act like generators and can burn things out.

 

My friend killed his video card this way, had it completely out and was blowing through the fan into the heat sink and as it spun up an LED came on on the card, when he plugged it back in it was completely dead.



#11 mjd420nova

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 01:36 PM

Many are justly concerned with compressed air from a compressor.  The moisure content is much too high and when focused on flat objects will create condensation.  Keeping the air below 50 PSI but one more concern comes to the forefront.  Static  charges will build up in the air stream and be carried to the work, especially on long rubber hoses.  The next approach is a vacuum and there in lies another chapter of precautions






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