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Looking For A New Router


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#1 GameMaster

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 04:24 PM

Hello,
I am looking for a new router for my home, our ISP gateway may not be cutting it with the wifi on authentication WPA2-AES. We will have random issues with wifi on most of our devices, such as wifi not automattically connecting. My internet plan, I think, is the up to 6mbps DSL plan from AT&T. It's more like 5mbps, last I checked from Speedtest.net. We do play online games and watch Netflix, so I'm thinking I may want to look into QoS. We also have thick walls and our house is quite long (3,200 square feet for the main level, according to my dad). The router will be situated at one end of the house, so having a good range is a must. We have about 9 wifi devices. The only other option for me is to try out WPA-PSK authentication, but I don't want our wifi to use insecure encryption. I was looking at the ASUS RT-N56U, but I'm not sure if it's overkill. I was also looking at D-Link's DIR-655. Any help is appreciated.

Edited by GameMaster, 07 July 2014 - 04:49 PM.


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#2 czarboom

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:25 AM

Hi,

So for the jump, it seems to me like your router needs a firmware update.  Usually, if all of sudden, your internet drops for no reason, and connects again, then something has changed and the best fix is to go to the manufactures website of your router. 

Located it by make and model

and download the newest firmware update, and instructions.  (Dlink, Cisco, etc are noted for this)

 

Make sure you do a backup of your routers current settings before you start the update. 

Then link with cisco routers, you connect your computer to it, login, save the settings. 

Then install the new firmware update, let it reboot, and load the backup settings.

 

If all goes well, you will be good to go.  I would try that first before you drop $100 USD or more for 6mbps. 

 

If you need help I would need to know the make and model and version of your current router.

 

good luck and let me know if you need any other help

cz


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#3 GameMaster

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:51 PM

Hi,

Thank you for your reply, czarboom. I have contacted my ISP to see if I could get any firmware updates, I could not. I switched my channel on the gateway to 7 (it used to be set on "Auto") and the mode to 11n only. This seemed to do fine for a tiny bit, however, I tested my main gaming pc which is connected through wireless and it will still sometimes not be connected when waking up from sleep or turning on. When I try to reconnect to the network manually, it will say the password is incorrect, which it is not. I can try channel 8, however, I doubt this will make a difference.

 

- GameMaster



#4 mainer21

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:18 PM

If you decide to purchase a new router, you can get some excellent information here regarding many manufactures.

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/view



#5 czarboom

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 12:54 AM

So your router, do you own it, or does your ISP?

What make and model is it?


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#6 cat1092

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 12:56 AM

GameMaster, Welcome to BC Forums!  :)

 

 

 

My internet plan, I think, is the up to 6mbps DSL plan from AT&T. It's more like 5mbps, last I checked from Speedtest.net. 

 

This in itself isn't unusual, many customers seldom, if ever, gets their advertised speeds. That's why in the fine print of the subscription level, it's often referred to as "up to" 6Mbps, a few customers may get that speed in times of less demand, such as around 2AM, but it's quite normal to receive speeds of 4-5Mbps during the day & possibly less during extreme peak usage times. 

 

AT&T is a heavily used ISP, in part because they're one of the leading wireless broadband companies in the nation. And though you may not be on that type of plan, the AT&T network all falls back on the same infrastructure. If more wireless capacity is needed for "premium" customers, they're going to pull it from residential areas, or any sources not running at 100% available bandwidth. This takes place in the background. 

 

This "insecure equipment" you're describing, is this the property of AT&T? I ask because you've stated calling them to ask about firmware updates, in general, ISP's doesn't assist with these (well, not for free anyway), unless it's their equipment. If that's the case, it's rather surprising they're furnishing such equipment for residential use. Normally a monthly fee is charged for modems/routers, so you'd be well within your rights to demand an up to date & secure model. 

 

Last time I used plain old WPA-PSK was a long time ago, like close to 8-9 years. WPA2-PSK has been mandatory on new wi-fi devices (bearing the name) since March 13, 2006. Certification began 18 months before that, in September 2004. 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access

 

Anyone within range with most any LInux OS whom needs a quick wi-fi connection, the WPA standard leaves an open invitation to target. All it takes is one 100% legit networking manager package added to a Linux distro, listed in the Software Manager & these old school networks basically becomes public ones (not legally), but in real world use. WPA2 offers Advanced Encryption Standard, which is far more secure than TKIP offered on WPA, which I recall being 90's standard. 

 

You may be better off with another ISP, if this is the equipment they furnish & charge you for. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 10 July 2014 - 01:09 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 czarboom

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 01:02 AM

And they told me DSL meant I never get slow downs EVER.... :deadhorse:


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#8 GameMaster

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 01:56 PM

Hello,

Thank you for your replies. In response to czarboom and cat1092, AT&T provided us with the gateway and they are the ones who support it. The model is a Netgear 7550, I believe. Also, my gateway is able to make use of WPA2-PSK(AES), but it also has more options. Not sure if I would call the equipment "insecure." I do not think we pay a monthly fee on the equipment, I believe we bought it from one of their stores. The only other ISP we can switch to, as far as I know, is Comcast and they already do a bad job of providing us with television cable. Sadly, U-Verse is not yet available here. :(

 

- GameMaster


Edited by GameMaster, 10 July 2014 - 01:58 PM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 02:01 PM

If you can make use of WPA2-PSK, then you should go for it, the security is much better. 

 

Plus it'll help in keeping the wi-fi freeloaders off of what you're paying for. What I described above happens all the time, most everywhere. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 czarboom

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 11:24 PM

OK,

agree with Cat, unless you have really old devices that can only handle WEP, use WPA2 personal. 

SO overall you can setup a main router, and connect a second router for WiFi.

Or go get a new one, and allow it to do both. 

 

OR, you can take the WiFi router, look up and install a free Open Source firmware for it, and use it that way.  Advantage is you can do what you want as long as your hardware allows it, and they tend to be more secure and issues are found and fixed much sooner than CISCO, or Netgear, ASUS etc. 

Disadvantage, if new firmware fails to load, then you can have a time getting it back up and running.  Just like with all Open Source nothing is guaranteed

 

Good luck and let us know what you decide and the results, if you need more help as at anytime.

cz


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#11 cat1092

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:04 AM

 

 

I can try channel 8, however, I doubt this will make a difference.

 

Depending on the area, sometimes it does make a difference. Like if most of the available wi-fi networks around are on the same channel. 

 

It doesn't harm anything to switch & see. 

 

What concerns me more than anything at the moment is the age of your networking equipment. Over time, many brands of routers begins to require more & more reboots to keep speed or connection. This is a sign that your router is getting worn out. If there is one that you can borrow, you can test this out for yourself, provided it's newer. 

 

And what type of Ethernet cables are you using? I was using Cat5e, but changed to Cat6 & my download speeds jumped by nearly 5Mbps, though upload remained the same. Newegg frequently runs Cat6 Ethernet cables on promo & is the current standard. My modem to router connection is by a Cat7 cable for less interference, so is the modem to VOIP device. 

 

The three other router outputs that goes to computers is Cat6. All were purchased for less than $20 from Newegg, including shipping. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 GameMaster

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:38 AM

Hello,
Thank you for your replies. I was planning to put my gateway into bridged mode and have a seperate router do the router part of the gateway's job. However, I also thought that I may be able to turn off the Wi-Fi on the gateway and just plug in the router to use the Wi-Fi on that, sort of what Czarboom was saying.

 

As for custom firmware, I don't think I would want to do that, it may void my warranty for the router or my current gateway. I also don't want to change my current gateway's firmware with a 3rd party one as it may not let me get help from AT&T in certain cases, though I could be wrong. However, I'm not very skilled in networking either.

 

Cat, the cable using to connect the gateway to the main desktop is a Cat5 cable. We also have a long data cable (I think may be what it is called) attached to get access to the actual internet.

- GameMaster


Edited by GameMaster, 12 July 2014 - 09:52 AM.


#13 cat1092

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:36 AM

Cables can go bad over time also, though it you ended up needing a new router, one normally is included. Though not a very long one. 

 

If the length is insufficient, it would be good to get a newer cable, the Cat6 ones will future proof your network for many years & help to ensure you get the speeds you're paying for. Possibly even more, the cable upgrade alone gave me higher download speeds than the advertised speed for my package. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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