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Comcast Business Modem/Router Setup Questions


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#1 ashergill

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 06:46 PM

Hi Everyone,

 

Networking novice here, so please pardon the relative lack of knowledge in this matter.

 

I recently signed up with Comcast Business class, and have received an SMC modem/router without wireless built-in.  I'm trying to set up an office network, so that I can have some devices wired into the modem/router, while others connect wireless to the same network through my own linksys WRT160N.  

 

The SMC has 4 available ports in the back.

 

Here is the setup:

 

SMC Port 1 --> Main PC

SMC Port 2 --> Samsung printer/copier/fax

SMC Port 3 --> Internet Port of Linksys WRT160N --> various wireless devices

SMC Port 4 --> Obi202 --> Phone

 

PC can see the printer on the network.  However, the wireless devices connected through Linksys WRT160N are not on the main network.

 

The SMC modem/router has an IP of 192.168.0.1 and I am able to access this through the PC browser.  The range of assignable DHCP addresses is 50 through 199.

The PC, Printer and the Obi all have addresses within this range.

 

The Linksys WRT160N, however, has an IP of 192.168.1.1, and DHCP is enabled.  Devices connecting through are presumably in the 192.168.1.xxx range.  Haven't checked though.

 

My questions:

 

1.  Is it okay for the devices that are hardwired to the SMC modem/router to be within that assignable range, or should they be assigned outside that range?  What is the difference?  If they should be outside, how do I change that?

 

2.  How do I get the Linksys wireless router to become a part of the same network as the main SMC modem/router?  I read something about disabling the DHCP etc., but do need specifics so I don't go doing the wrong thing.

 

3.  Comcast business also has modem/router combos with wireless built-in.  Would it be better for someone like me to simply ask them to exchange it to one of those devices, so I don't have to mess with the wireless router on my own?

 

Any help or advice I can get on these issues will be greatly appreciated.

 

regards,

 

AJ



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#2 czarboom

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 01:05 AM

 

My questions:

 

1.  Is it okay for the devices that are hardwired to the SMC modem/router to be within that assignable range, or should they be assigned outside that range?  What is the difference?  If they should be outside, how do I change that?

So the IP range of 192.168.0.1 is fine for the range... with DHCP your range is not to important.  Meaning it will go from \2 to \254.

 

2.  How do I get the Linksys wireless router to become a part of the same network as the main SMC modem/router?  I read something about disabling the DHCP etc., but do need specifics so I don't go doing the wrong thing.

Easiest way is to cascade to cascade do the following.

  1. Connect your SMC like normal.  But do not connect anything to it.  Run a connection from 1 port on your SMC (any port other than the incoming internet port) to the Internet Port on your WRT160. 
  2. From there connect all the wired and wireless devices to the WRT160n.
  3. Open a web browser and type in 192.168.1.1, (or whatever the default IP is for the WRT160 router).  From there do the setup like normal.
  4. Or you can Bridge the networks, search bridge connection.
  5. When you do this both routers cannot have the same IP ranges.  IE 192.168.0.1 cannot be connected to 192.168.0.2  (.1 is the SMC, .2 is the WRT in this example)
  6. Here is a guide to doing this by Cisco with pictures etc.  Click HERE for the link.  It has bridge instructions as well.

 

3.  Comcast business also has modem/router combos with wireless built-in.  Would it be better for someone like me to simply ask them to exchange it to one of those devices, so I don't have to mess with the wireless router on my own?

 

That depends on your amount of time.  Learning about this will help you later.  But, I do my own networking that way I can do what I want.  I always tell people to learn about their tech, but if you don't want to or don't have the time, simple is easier. 

 

Overall you can either turn off the router functions of the SMC by disabling DHCP and giving it a IP (static IP) like 192.169.0.2, and connect it to the WRT160 and let the WRT160 do all the WiFi work. 

Or leave both on but the two cannot be on same network, or talk to each-other.  The link will explain the details

 

Good luck

cz


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#3 czarboom

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 01:10 AM

also in question 1 I forgot to say that all your devices in a given network can only be inside the assigned IP range.  I don't want to get into cider and classless but just know if you are using 192.168.0.xxx then you can only have devices in that range, for the most part.  There are ways to curve this but we will follow the KISS principle and Keep It Simple.  So if you give your printer 192.168.1.100 then it will never network correctly, or be able to get to the public IP.  (your IP of 192.168.0.1 is private, it is not the IP others will see when your using the internet that is assigned by your ISP such as Time Warner, U verse, etc)


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#4 smax013

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 12:13 AM

Hi Everyone,
 
Networking novice here, so please pardon the relative lack of knowledge in this matter.
 
I recently signed up with Comcast Business class, and have received an SMC modem/router without wireless built-in.  I'm trying to set up an office network, so that I can have some devices wired into the modem/router, while others connect wireless to the same network through my own linksys WRT160N.  
 
The SMC has 4 available ports in the back.
 
Here is the setup:
 
SMC Port 1 --> Main PC
SMC Port 2 --> Samsung printer/copier/fax
SMC Port 3 --> Internet Port of Linksys WRT160N --> various wireless devices
SMC Port 4 --> Obi202 --> Phone
 
PC can see the printer on the network.  However, the wireless devices connected through Linksys WRT160N are not on the main network.
 
The SMC modem/router has an IP of 192.168.0.1 and I am able to access this through the PC browser.  The range of assignable DHCP addresses is 50 through 199.
The PC, Printer and the Obi all have addresses within this range.
 
The Linksys WRT160N, however, has an IP of 192.168.1.1, and DHCP is enabled.  Devices connecting through are presumably in the 192.168.1.xxx range.  Haven't checked though.
 
My questions:
 
1.  Is it okay for the devices that are hardwired to the SMC modem/router to be within that assignable range, or should they be assigned outside that range?  What is the difference?  If they should be outside, how do I change that?


The DHCP assignable range between 50 and 199 means that the SMC router's DHCP function will assign devices an IP address some where between 192.168.0.50 and 192.168.0.199. So, for example, a device attached to the SMC router will NOT be assign a dynamic IP address of 192.168.0.45 since that in not in the range of IP address "set aside" for the DHCP server.

The purpose, generally, behind this feature to is to leave some IP addresses "unavailable" to the DHCP to assign as dynamic IP addresses so that those IP address could be used as a static IP address.

More than likely, in your case, you don't need static IP addresses for any thing. So, end result is that it is not something you likely have to worry about.
 

2.  How do I get the Linksys wireless router to become a part of the same network as the main SMC modem/router?  I read something about disabling the DHCP etc., but do need specifics so I don't go doing the wrong thing.


Basically, follow the instructions for the "LAN to LAN" in the link that czarboom provided. That should keep everything in the 192.168.0.xxx range of the SMC router.

The other option is to do the "LAN to WAN" instructions and just have all your wired devices connect to the Linksys (I believe this is what czarboom was suggesting). Then all the devices will be in the 192.168.1.xxx range assigned by the Linksys router. This method does put everything behind a "double NAT router". Generally speaking, that is not a huge deal, but it can potentially slow your Internet connection down (I have read reports from some people finding that removing the second router sped up their connection). The potential advantage of this approach is that you can allow guests to connect directly to the SMC, but they will not "see" your stuff that is "behind" the Linksys router.
 

3.  Comcast business also has modem/router combos with wireless built-in.  Would it be better for someone like me to simply ask them to exchange it to one of those devices, so I don't have to mess with the wireless router on my own?
 
Any help or advice I can get on these issues will be greatly appreciated.
 
regards,
 
AJ


I would say it all depends on your tolerance for dealing with tech. If you just hate dealing with computer/tech, then it might be better to just get a router/modem combo with WiFi from Comcast. If you are open to dealing with tech, but just lack experience, then I don't see a reason to get a combo router/modem from Comcast with WiFi…you should be able to get what you have to work with help as needed.

Personally, I don't like combo routers/modem. I like to have a dedicated modem and router that I pick myself. But that is just me.

#5 ashergill

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 02:17 PM

Thank you, czarboom and smax.  I don't really hate dealing with tech.  In fact, I like to do it and have learned lots by doing things myself and perusing forums such as these.  My problem is actually the opposite: I get so occupied with making sure I understand and can do such things myself that I spend way more time on it than I probably should.  Eventually I find it to be worth it though.

 

Anyway, I appreciate the input.  I think I'll try the LAN to LAN setup and see if I can get things working.

 

sincerely,

 

AJ



#6 czarboom

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:34 PM

welcomed, and remember to post back anytime you need help.  I will follow for 48 more hrs. if you get it working let us know to.

 

good luck


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#7 ashergill

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 11:47 AM

So, I followed the advice and instructions, and have a fully functional network at this point. Thank you both again for your help.

Regards,

AJ

#8 czarboom

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 11:17 PM

good stuff and good job, glad to help

 

cz


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?




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