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My New PC.


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 09:00 PM

Just got a new Desktop, Still setting it up.

 

 

@ Cat, Re our chat's about Partition Aligment, I ran the standard Kubuntu Partitioning tool, And guess what it did the Partition Aligmend by default. And yes I left some slack space for wear leveling.

 

Oh yes 8GB ram. This thing is so fast. I know an i5 is overkill on Linux but hey.

 

345blw0.png


Edited by NickAu1, 04 July 2014 - 09:03 PM.


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#2 cat1092

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 10:42 PM

Glad to hear about partition alignment finally working during a Linux install, it's been what, nearly 5 years since Windows 7 included it out of the box? 
 
Better late than never! :guitar:
 
That's a Killer PC you have there & no it's not Overkill. Here's why. Just like Linux MInt on mine, that's i7 based, the OS will be on cruise, barely using 5% of your CPU power. In return, your PC will run nice & cool, nothing will be under strain & you'll actually use less power (as measured on the meter). 
 
On the other hand, an equivalent AMD chip would have required much more power out of the box just to run & it would have ran as hot as I don't know what, most all AMD's does. That's why they're cheap. You've been around plenty long enough to know, you get what you pay for. That's why AMD is losing money & laying off employees, because they build garbage. If their products were good, they'd be in high demand & wouldn't have to cut jobs. Intel has far more employees than AMD, even though their hardware costs 2 & 3x as much. They (AMD) throws in a graphic chip, call it an APU & declare themselves as innovative. Intel has done this for years & they didn't have to rename their CPU's in doing so. All AMD did was rename the hardware as though they did something & took credit for the work that Intel laid the road for years ago. 
 
My only regrets about installing Linux Mint to the SSD is that less than 10% of the total partitioned space is being used. Plus 15% unpartitioned at the end. BTW, that was good of you to do, leaving that blank space. Your SSD will live longer & perform better because of it. 
 
Oh, my regrets about the SSD. I should have grabbed another much smaller one, like 60-64GB tops, though it wouldn't have saved much cash. Because my intentions were to run a couple of virtual machines in the home folder. It's not recommended to do that on a SSD. The reason, every time that VM is closed (it's not shut down), a massive write is created. Do that 2-3 times a day, guess what? That will be more writes than those who benchmarks SSD's to test for article publishing writes to the drives. The result? A short lived SSD. 
 
I'm having doubts about the decision to run Mint on that SSD. Not to mention the 4-5 reinstalls, those were formatted every time, which no doubt caused wear. Plus the fact that a total of 8.13GB is being used of the whole drive (111.79GB as usable by GParted). Barely 2GB in the Home folder & that's due to a Linux ISO in the folder. It wouldn't be that much slower running on a Flash drive, which costs less & can be tossed when no good w/out losing much. 

 

However I'm glad to hear about your PC, keep us updated! 

 

Will be great to see the final build. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 04 July 2014 - 10:57 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 NickAu

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 10:58 PM

 

Not to mention the 4-5 reinstalls

Kubuntu went in clean. The rest was my fault. Ummmm I forgot to record the encryption key, and well when my pc rebooted, I love Gparted Live.

 

250 GB SSD that will take some filling. I kept trim off as its such a big SSD I will do the Trim oce a month saves read/writes.

 

 

the OS will be on cruise, barely using 5% of your CPU power

Yes i think my cpu is asleep.


Edited by NickAu1, 04 July 2014 - 11:01 PM.


#4 cat1092

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 11:07 PM

In the event a Linux user likes to game, then more of the SSD will be used, putting it to use. Tons of games can be stored in that amount of space & Steam for Linux is available & Alive. 

 

I truly believe you'll come to love this PC & who knows, it may become your favorite? 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 NickAu

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 11:17 PM


 

, it may become your favorite?

Yes I said that about the laptop, Now all I get is I love my new laptop dad. A friend of hers offered to install Windows 7 on the Alienware, She wont hear of it, Now this is true, Imagine a 15 yo who dont know how to use Windows, She can use it to browse and that, She just dont get the rest, And point blank refuses to use it, A number of her friends are also on various Linux depending on system.

 

My status was the kid's idea. Profile:

"They say when you play a Microsoft CD backwards you can hear satanic messages ..... but that's nothing, if you play it forward it will install Windows"


Edited by NickAu1, 04 July 2014 - 11:18 PM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 11:45 PM

Seems that I heard that profile message in the past, but I forget where. It does hold water though, because Windows is a PITA. 

 

You can fully install, update the Linux & most all of your favorite apps & tools inside of 2 hours. 

 

With Windows 7, if you have a fast SSD & ISP connection for updates, one may finish in a day. If it's a spinner, forget it, it's more like a weekend. You know, removing the junk software after OEM reinstall & all. 

 

My wife has ran Linux for 2 years, though she did try Windows 7, didn't like it, so I put her on Mint & she loves it. She PC illiterate, so it's best to have a Linux OS, that way no worries about clicking onto to something stupid. Yes, in your part of the world, as well as in Africa, there are many more Linux users than in the US. Lots of children uses Ubuntu & Edubuntu in schools. 

 

These folks here are brainwashed, thinking that just because something's free, it's no good. When I show them my Linux MInt installs, they act surprised. Most all were expecting to not see a browser, just a session of all of the green numbers, what year are they in? I've converted a few to Linux over the last couple of years, but it's hard. There's a difference between showing your wife, who's at home & your friends, who may live miles away. I send them to the forums. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 czarboom

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 12:34 AM

 

Oh yes 8GB ram. This thing is so fast. I know an i5 is overkill on Linux but hey.

 

Now who ever said "Nope, I want less speed" .  LOL.  The big issue is you will get to love using a i5, then you will get to a computer with 4 GB ram and a Duo Core and want to shoot yourself. 


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#8 NickAu

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 12:50 AM

I have a core duo @ 1.8 GHZ here 1 GB ram.



#9 czarboom

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 01:03 AM

LOL wow... still does good with Linux


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#10 cat1092

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 01:13 AM

I have a core duo @ 1.8 GHZ here 1 GB ram.

That was a solid CPU in it's day & likely still better than some of the AMD "A4" models pushed in $250-300 PC's 

 

RAM probably can be upgraded, if need be. But with the lightweight distros ran on the computer, 1GB is enough. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 czarboom

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 02:09 AM

Agreed Linux doesn't have the "everyone share RAM and O wait you need some more" issues that win 7 and 8 seem to love.  I know the difference is shared and dedicated but really... who hasn't had a Win vista, 7 or 8 with 95% RAM usage and spikes from Super and Pre fetch as well as the write cache...

ANGER!!!!!


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#12 Al1000

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 03:25 AM

Nice system Nick!

I had never even even heard of ''SSD'' until now, and had no idea what they are until I had a quick read of wiki.

It's also interesting to read about the differences between modern AMD and Intel CPUs. The last ''high performance'' desktop I built is the one I have now, which I built around 10 years ago, and is obviously rather mediocre by modern standards. But it still does everything I want it to do at reasonable speed, and about the only game I ever play is the old Command and Conquer Red Alert 2.

I went for the AMD 4200 Dual Core CPU at that time as it wasn't far off the ''top of the range,'' and seemed like good value for money too. But from what I'm reading here, when I eventually get round to building a new desktop and upgrading to 64 bit, which will probably be when a major component in this desktop breaks, I would be better to go for an Intel CPU.

Hope you have lots of fun with your new computer. :)

#13 czarboom

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 03:49 AM

 

But from what I'm reading here, when I eventually get round to building a new desktop and upgrading to 64 bit, which will probably be when a major component in this desktop breaks, I would be better to go for an Intel CPU.

 

If you computer is at 10 yrs or so, I would say start over or buy a new one.  Biggest differenct in old processors and todays are heat.  Lets put it this way.  I have an Alienware laptop, i7 16GB RAM.  Not the tip top, but as close as you can get.  It weighs about the weight of 3 normal laptops, and gets so hot I cannot put it on my lap.  Not due to the case, but it has 4 fans in the bottom of it, and when they kick on it will almost burn you. 

 

So if you go big, do it in a new case, and get a cooling system.  With at least a on the top and exhaust fan.  These days it seems Intel is kicking AMDs cores to death in benchmarks.  Intels new guy is Xeon.... I would still go with a i5.  Unless you render and do a LOT of overclocking. 

 

AMD is almost the same as Intel in Desktops, 10 more frames a second in Battlefield 4 is not worth $200 USD.  AMD is cheaper but the real difference is in laptops.

Intel is way better than AMD in laptops.  Usually that is what you will find in most rigs is Intel desktops.

 

But, a i5-3470 to the casual gamer is no different that using an AMD-FX8350.  Unless you do 3D rendering it will not matter and with a desktop AMD will save you a few 100 dollars. 


CZARBOOM 
 
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#14 Al1000

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 05:11 AM

I don't see the point in buying a new computer when the old one still does the job. But thanks for the info re processors, and I'll look into that further when I do upgrade.

The case I have is rather large anyway and has two fans on the back, two on the front, one on the side and one on the top. I had always had the case fans running on their slowest speed, and have never had any problems with excessive heat. Recently though when I had to replace the power pack, I found the fan speed control no longer worked, and they all ran flat out which made a heck of a noise, particularly given their age. So I disconnected all but the two on the back, and replaced them with new ones. They blow air directly onto the video card which has a large heat-sink rather than a fan, and together with the CPU and power pack fans, that seems to keep everything cool enough.

I used to have over-clocking software installed that came with the motherboard, but don't bother with it any more.

Edited by Al1000, 05 July 2014 - 05:32 AM.


#15 cat1092

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 09:36 PM

 

 

 AMD is cheaper but the real difference is in laptops.

And the fast growing all-in-one (AIO) PC lineup. 

 

These are basically constructed from notebook components, all the way to the PSU. I've worked on a total of three, one of my own. The common component that they share with towers or small form factors is the HDD. they're usually the 3.5" drives. 

 

And just as with notebooks, there's one tiny fan to cool the entire unit on most. Needless to say, these tends to warm up fast & if used for all of one's daily computing, wear will show fast. My HP MS214 AIO model is sitting in the corner awaiting a PSU that may revive it, may not. Purchased one month after the release of Windows 7 & broke in less than 4 years. 

 

Which is why when I do replace the PSU, I'll search at places that sells spare components on the cheap such as the local Hospice outlet. I can carry it in with me to ensure it'll boot & once I see it holds up for a few months, decide on buying a new one, or if it works & they have two of them, get them from there. I feel it was underpowered, it came with a 120W PSU, there's similar business models with 150W ones. Which is what I'm looking for, power to spare. 

 

My suggestion to anyone considering one of these AIO models, insist on Intel based units for long term reliability. The extra cash will pay for a longer lasting computer. Every AMD based computer that I've touched has one thing in common, running hot under moderate use for a couple of hours.

 

Nick, am looking forward to seeing more pics of your new PC.  :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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