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Migration


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#1 KilHakr

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 12:02 PM

We've been the victim over the past many months of a vicious fking hacker...they've pretty much gotten into our system and are having their way with it. Everything from changing passwords to keylogging to stealing bank info. We filed a bank report awhile back when it occurred and have some idea of who it might be,but of course no one we reported it to can divulge the address the merchandise was shipped to with my bank card which could lead to more clues.

 

Anyway in the meantime we've decided it was about time to get a new computer anyway,we've had Dells for years but now considered Mac as we've heard their security is better. Though we did go with another Dell,we want to be able to migrate our things from the old computer onto the new but without any infected files. We do have a program called Intellimover,but it's so old who knows what it'll do.

 

At one point we were going to reformat the old computer using an external drive,then clean the files and reload them back on...but now we have the other computer so we'd like to just transfer directly.

 

Thoughts?



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#2 wpgwpg

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 12:35 PM

 I would be very careful NOT to transfer any executable files.  There're several ways to transfer your data.

 

 You could copy your data to an external hard drive or flash drive, then copy it onto the new computer.

 

 The method I use a lot is to set up a network for both computers, then just copy and paste from the old to the new.  Bear in mind that if the volume of data is high, this could be time consuming, especially if you do it over a WiFi connection.

 

 The third method is to use the Windows Easy Transfer program.  I'm not a fan of this method because I like to be sure of what I'm copying, but some folks like it.  If you use it, just be very careful about any executable files (especially email attachments) it copies.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#3 KilHakr

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 01:49 PM

Well many of the files we have are program files...as far as drives,why copy them onto drives first? And our connection is wireless as we have a couple computers running on it...



#4 cyberSAR

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 03:21 PM

I'd get the new machine set up and secured first. Install a good AV and anti-malware program , install the drive either temporarily in the machine or in a dock, scan thoroughly then copy your data over.



#5 Guest_Kaosu_*

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 03:30 PM

I strongly recommend that you do not try to transfer your old programs and such to your new computer. Instead, download new copies of the software from trusted sources, find new replacements for really old software, or contact the vendor and ask them if they can provide you with a new installation for previously purchased software. Otherwise, you will probably just reinfect your new computer and all of the old problems will come creeping back into your life.

 

Do not allow the infected computer to remain on your network. It may seem harmless to let it stay connected, but all this does is turn your private network into a hostile public environment. This infected machine can easily sniff all incoming/outgoing traffic across your home network and continue to steal passwords, personal information, etc. Even if you don't allow this machine to share files with other computers, it can still spy on your communications. Heck, in this scenario, this machine could easily spy on your HTTPS communications using something like SSLStrip.

 

Once you take this infected machine offline, you should copy your important data to a CD, DVD, thumb drive, external hard drive or something similar. You also want to make sure to disable auto play on your new computer so you don't accidently reinfect yourself. The infected machine will most likely infect the media and hope the new computer will auto play hidden nasties. Once you have successfully transferred over the data, if you used a thumb drive or external hard drive, I would just reformat the device to be extra careful. Once formatted, you can create a new partition and use it to store your clean backups.

 

Copying over Microsoft Office (or similar) documents can be just as dangerous as executables. Be extremely careful when backing these kinds of files up. I understand the need to transfer over these types of files, but use caution when doing so. If you do copy these types of files over, make sure to scan them on your new computer before opening anything. While this won't detect every threat out there, it would at least stop you from reinfecting yourself with known malware.

 

Stay away from Microsoft's Easy Transfer junk. If you go this route, you will most likely just reinfect your new computer. This scenario isn't your typical "migrate to a new computer", because the old computer has been compromised and you can't trust it. Software like Microsoft's Easy Tranfer is great for typical migration, but does a terrible job in situations like this, because you really need to only move over important documents and manually recover old software, etc.


Edited by Kaosu, 28 June 2014 - 03:35 PM.


#6 cyberSAR

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 03:45 PM

I was a bit fast in my reply and forgot to mention that I would definitely try to clean the infected machine and determine what you may have and how it occurred prior to doing any file transfers. Also don't forget the rest of the network including your router.



#7 wpgwpg

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 03:58 PM

Well many of the files we have are program files...as far as drives,why copy them onto drives first? And our connection is wireless as we have a couple computers running on it...

 You can't copy program files, you have to reinstall them.  Since you've reported problems on the old computer, you want to be very careful not to transfer that problem onto the new computer.  As far as transferring files via WiFi, it's infinitely faster to transfer disk to disk over a wired connection than it is via WiFi.  For example, I can back up about 115 GB using a USB 3 connection in 15 minutes; to do that via WiFi would take the better part of a DAY. 

  I see you've gotten a lot of good advice from Koasu.  I agree with everything he said.  

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#8 quietman7

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 07:08 AM

If you system was previously infected, the safest practice is not to backup (and transfer) any files with the following file extensions: .exe, .scr, .bat, .com, .cmd, .msi, .pif, .ini, .htm, .html, .hta, .php, .asp, .xml, .zip, .rar, .cab as they still may be infected.
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