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New LIghtweight Portable Security ISO Released


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 01:08 AM

Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) is what it implies, a light Linux OS, created by the US Air Force Research Laboratory for their & general public use. 

 

A new version is generally released 3-4 times yearly, there a Deluxe (which includes LibreOffice & Adobe Reader) & a Standard one w/out these. There are also PAE & non-PAE releases in both versions. This can be used for general web browsing & making transactions, though a clean boot is recommended before conducting the latter. 

 

Read on for more:

 

http://spi.dod.mil/lipose.htm

 

There is also a link to be notified when new releases are available. The latest version of LPS (1.5.3) is dated 06/20/2014. 

 

Enjoy a fast, portable OS for secure browsing & conducting business. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 12:43 PM

What is all this about, just like a LiveUSB?


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#3 cat1092

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 03:10 PM

Yes, it can be used for general Web browsing, the deluxe version has LibreOffice/Adobe Reader, it can be used as any Live Linux image. Except it's not intended to install, which would be defeating the purpose of the OS. 

 

It's designed for Internet users of all types to conduct secure business with. Each session runs in memory only, so nothing is saved to disk. Excellent OS to make transactions, provided one doesn't do a lot of browsing beforehand, in which if that's the case, reboot & then conduct business. 

 

This secure OS was designed & is used by the Air Force for secure sessions. Though they didn't have to, it was decided that the general public could make use of it for the same reasons. LPS is updated to a new version at least twice yearly, though in the last couple of years, has been quarterly. 

 

LPS was designed with size & security in mind, hence the small image. One doesn't need a fully loaded bootable OS for it's intended purpose. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 pcpunk

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 03:32 PM

Thanks Cat, I did read the link but was just unsure of the difference or the benefit of it for the average user? if at all.


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#5 cat1092

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

You're welcome, pcpunk.  :thumbup2:

 

Being that you have Linux install media, you likely don't need it, unless you're curious. 

 

One can do the same with much any Linux install media, as long as it's a recent release. Older releases from years back, the browser wouldn't be up to date, which is required for some financial transactions. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 NickAu

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 10:54 PM

 

Except it's not intended to install, which would be defeating the purpose of the OS.

+1

IMHO

To be truly secure and effective these things MUST be burned to CD or DVD. I do not consider a bootable USB stick secure. It can be written to.

 

To do banking and shopping on line I use an old laptop that I boot with Remastered Puppy Linux on a CD this also contains a encrypted file with my passwords on it, There is no HDD in it, And I never plug a USB stick in. As Puppy runs in ram only when I shut down the laptop everything is gone. For this I do not even use a save file.


Edited by NickAu1, 18 November 2014 - 10:57 PM.


#7 cat1092

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 12:01 AM

True, and really we can use most any Linux install media for this purpose. Xfce is Lightweight, and both Ubuntu & LInux MInt has at least two of this version still supported (Xubuntu 12.04 &14.04 & Mint 13 & 17). There are likely other Xfce OS's, but these are the mainstream ones. 512MiB of RAM is plenty, as 64 bit Linux Mint 17 MATE (a fully loaded OS) idles using less than 700MiB on my desktop.

 

I suppose the folks behind the Lightweight Portable Security also had a light OS in mind, while it most certainly requires more resources than Puppy to run, the non-PAE images can easily run on old P3 computers & have a nice desktop environment. 512MiB is the lowest I've booted the non-Deluxe CD to, unfortunately I have no smaller sticks to test with that I'm aware of. If I did, I'd test it with a lower amount of RAM.

 

Note that the Lightweight Portable Security ISO's aren't released by fly by nighters compiling Linux distros as a side gig while working a day job, these folks are dedicated professionals, and there's a lot more going on behind the scenes, some things that we'll never know about until after the fact, if then.

 

http://www.hpc.mil/index.php

 

I hope that readers of this doesn't think that our military trusts our drone & other sensitive operations to inferior Windows OS's, that is too huge of a risk to worldwide security (not computing related). These ISO are used to conduct secret missions, and if they're good enough for the US Air Force, they're more than good enough for one clinging to an XP computer, hoping it'll live until the next decade arrives. At least one can securely shop & perform other transactions security, no matter how infected the computer is, or how degraded the install.

 

All that's needed is a working optical drive & Internet connection.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 NickAu

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 12:06 AM

 

Note that the Lightweight Portable Security ISO's aren't released by fly by nighters compiling Linux distros as a side gig while working a day job, these folks are dedicated professionals,

+ 1

 

And knowing some of the Puppy Linux crowd paranoid as heck about privacy and security. The dev's of Puppy Linux do some amazing stuff. And there are a few tricks with save files that you can do that give you persistence even on Live CD so you can save browser updates and some settings.


Edited by NickAu1, 19 November 2014 - 12:10 AM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 12:49 AM

Yes I agree that Puppy devs puts a lot, if not more, effort into their OS's than any other. This is because of the nature of Puppy, while it appears very elementary on the monitor, is very complex behind the scenes. I've used a couple of the 200MiB FatDog64 ISO's to test hardware & they scream, even on computers that some would consider to be rubbish (such as Intel Celerons/Pentiums & lower class AMD models).

 

At that size of an ISO, it should do just that. Though I haven't used it for browsing except once, it makes excellent bootable testing media for 64 bit hardware.

 

 

And there are a few tricks with save files that you can do that give you persistence even on Live CD so you can save browser updates and some settings.

 

This is what throws me for a loop & why Puppy is one of the more advanced to use. Maybe if I needed persistence, I'd take the time to learn, I just don't need it. Have two Linux installs on Flash drives, and am going to perform an install to a USB HDD, that will be bootable on all computers, except those with Secure Boot, which will be faster than on the Flash drives. Less than 20MiB/sec benchmarks aren't good, on a HDD, speed will be much faster, even with USB 2.0.

 

Believe it or not, I once had Ubuntu in an enclosure installed on a 1TB WD Caviar Black with a 32MiB cache, and it ran faster than the installed XP Pro, via USB 2.0. Now, that's a tail whipping to place on an installed OS, has it been USB 3.0, XP would have been totally left in a dust cloud.

 

Probably will install a 32 & 64 bit version to USB drive, to have to run on any computer. Once booted, it runs just as it was installed on the computer. Many times, better, though some computers are funny about booting from a USB 3.0 port. It doesn't matter, if that's the case, USB 2.0 is plenty fine. No need for persistence using this method, and users can have their own account, even if it's a visitor or occasional user, or helping one to fix their computer. This option allows one to pay their bills or whatever until I can repair the affected unit.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 NickAu

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 01:05 AM

Believe it or not, I once had Ubuntu installed on a 32 GiB SD card.
 
 

 

 why Puppy is one of the more advanced to use

 Puppy Linux has enough similarity to other popular lightweight desktops environments like Xfce and LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment), so it is easy to use.

 

Oh yes Puppy Linux Have a look at the PC specs.

29fxvfa.png


Edited by NickAu1, 19 November 2014 - 01:09 AM.


#11 cat1092

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 01:46 AM

I had Ubuntu 12.04 installed to a 32GiB Flash drive, and another OS (may have been Deepin Linux) installed to a very tiny Samsung 16GiB Micro SDHC card, one fourth of the size of a SD card. This one, pulled up my Newegg order history to find it.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147234

 

Doggone, was it slow, at 13GiB/sec (measured by HD Tune), the OS performance was unbearlingly slow. How in the heck is this supposed to be used in camcorders to catch the action in "real time"? By the time the action has been performed, the card would miss it. I have a no-name Flash drive, picked up at an Office Depot, that performs better.

 

That card is the worst (by a long shot) Samsung product that I've owned. Next time I a need Micro SDHC card, I'll look at another brand. Even at 16GiB for $7, it wasn't worth it, only to store files on using a SD card reader. Fetching them is going to be slower than an IDE HDD. Forget using it for install media, unless one's desperate.

 

I'm serious, am surprised to see Samsung stamp their name on such garbage. They should have sold them all to AData, Kingston, Mushkin, or one of the 2nd tier brands & let their reputation be on the line. Few of their SSD's can break the SATA 2 standatrd of 300MiB/sec & hold it, so it would have been a good fit. Honestly, I don't know if Samsung will release the card again. Much of what they touch becomes gold, but not that card. More like aluminum.

 

I doubt it can run Puppy at a decent speed, that's how bad it is.

 

Lightweight Portable Security isn't designed to be ran from these drives, for security reasons, so we'll (or I'll) never know how it would run on that garbage.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 NickAu

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 02:01 AM

 

I doubt it can run Puppy at a decent speed, that's how bad it is.

As Puppy runs entirely in ram the speed of the card would only matter at bootup and write operations and even then you would not notice,  It would have no affect on how fast things like Firefox ect started once clicked.



#13 cat1092

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 02:36 AM

Yes, I recall that FatDog64 ran in RAM also, no wonder it screamed! :guitar:

 

There are real hardware RAM based SSD's. but these are way to expensive for consumers, though some of the PCIe offerings has some real RAM inside (or so has been reported). At a minimum of 1.6GiB/sec, something more than Flash is inside.

 

Even plain old DDR RAM is faster than a SATA 3 SSD, if the data could continuosly run on it. 

 

Back to a point you made earlier, this is why Lightweight Portable Security exists, to prevent the retention of Data between reboots, so those looking for that solution should only consider Puppy if they're not wanting to save data, which is fine too, it can be done. I never saved what data that I used with FatDog64, and it takes practice to create & learning a persistence file.

 

Even you acknowledged this in Post #6.

 

Puppy was designed to do both, either do one's business & reboot the computer, flushing the memory of all, or to have a Persistence file for future sessions. It's not recommended to do this with LPS.

 

I believe that any saving of data is outside the scope of this Topic. It's best to make this clear before it becomes a debate, to discard or save. The Topic is based on boot, do one's business & discard.

 

However this is 100% correct, in Live Mode with Puppy & many Linux install media types.

 

 

As Puppy runs entirely in ram the speed of the card would only matter at bootup and write operations and even then you would not notice,  It would have no affect on how fast things like Firefox ect started once clicked.

 

Live Mode is what I'm pushing here, with a fast grab CD for many. Many Puppy varaints are also in CD format, smaller than LPS. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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