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What is the best vehicle to hide my ip address or change it


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#1 kenshireen

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 09:20 PM

I have comcast and they use a dynamic IP.. They were not able to tell me how often their server updates it.

So I want to know what is the least expensive and best way to hide my IP address.

Thank you



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 09:34 PM

You cannot hide your IP address.  The best bet would be to use a VPN service.  I have a proXPN account.  I mostly use it to verify connection issues.  VPN is not good for gaming as your Internet traffic is being routed through another machine and this naturally introduces lag.



#3 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:10 PM

Everything on the Internet must have an IP address.  You can use a proxy server, which will hide your real IP address to others, but not the proxy server.  The proxy server will know you as 1.2.3.4 (example), but the distant website might know you as 5.6.7.8.

Another alternative is the TOR network.  My real IP now is 67.x.x.x, but on the TOR network it is 96.x.x.x (iran), I click new identity, and the new ip is 77.x.x.x (shows the Gulf of Guinea), you get the idea.  No computer, except the initial one you connect to, to get into the TOR network, knows your IP address.  The thing about the TOR network, is it is slower than a direct connect through your ISP.

The TOR Network is ran by volunteers that share their bandwidth.  However, when I use this, I will not use it for critical communications like with the bank, credit card company, etc.  It is supposedly secure, but I won't take the chance, when it comes to my banking, etc info

Now for your comment "I have comcast and they use a dynamic IP.. They were not able to tell me how often their server updates it".  The tech doesn't know what he or she is talking about.  You can determine when your IP will change, if nothing ever would go wrong.  The tech should have been able to tell you this.  When you get an IP address from your ISP, it is called a "lease".  You can see the lease information yourself.  Open a command window and enter "IPCONFIG /ALL" (no quotes).  You'll see, within the stuff on the screen something like this:

   Lease Obtained. . . : Sunday, June 22, 2014 7:29:31 AM
   Lease Expires . . . : Sunday, December 12, 2021 10:29:37 PM

The "Lease Expires" is when the IP address you have is released, and you'd get a new one, in theory.  Sometimes, you'll get the same one.  If you loose power, you could get a new IP address, and other circumstances will give you a new IP.

There are ways to reset it:

1.  Do a power cycle.  Unplug the power cord to your router/modem for 2 minutes.  When it starts, you should have a new IP.  If your router/modem from comcast had batteries in it, then the batteries will have to be removed, I think.  Or just use one of the following.  My router/modem doesn't have batteries, but a friend that had TWC/RR had batteries in his router/modem.

2.  Do a hard reset.  Somewhere on your router/modem, there should be a recessed button, a little bigger than a paperclip.  Press and hold it until the lights blink on and off.  That should set your router/modem back to factory spects, and thus a new IP.  But I recommend #3, if it is available.

3.  My router/modem, when I connect to it, has a "reboot" button on the screen.  When I click it, it resets/reboots the router/modem, and the IP is reset.  Yours might have this one.  But if it does, make sure that you (or family members) aren't downloading anything, etc, because the download will abort.

4.  There are proxy servers that will hide your IP from distant sites, similar to the TOR network.

 

Oh yea, and TOR is free.

Best of luck.


Edited by scotty_ncc1701, 22 June 2014 - 10:15 PM.


#4 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 07:01 AM

OK kenshireen, what did you do to my internet service... :hysterical:  JUST KIDDING OF COURSE!

But it's funny, that after you asked about IP addresses and getting a new one, the server that services me went kaplewee (over night)!

After talking to the tech, he told me the problems was in the BRAS (Broadband Remote Access Server), which hands out the IP addresses.  He indicated alot of customers were affected.  I'm DSL, but cable would have a similar device, if not the exact same, functionally.

So if anyone wants more info about how the ISPs give out IP addresses, duck "Broadband Remote Access Server".

"duck" = I don't google anymore, since last summer or so.  I use:

http://www.duckduckgo.com

 



#5 Kilroy

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 09:54 AM

scotty_ncc1701, I have to disagree with you about the DHCP lease.  Windows machines start attempting to renew their lease at 50% of the lease time.

 

My understanding is that you need to leave your cable modem powered off for an extended period of time, greater than 24 hours, to get a new IP address.



#6 kenshireen

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 02:07 PM

Everything on the Internet must have an IP address.  You can use a proxy server, which will hide your real IP address to others, but not the proxy server.  The proxy server will know you as 1.2.3.4 (example), but the distant website might know you as 5.6.7.8.

Another alternative is the TOR network.  My real IP now is 67.x.x.x, but on the TOR network it is 96.x.x.x (iran), I click new identity, and the new ip is 77.x.x.x (shows the Gulf of Guinea), you get the idea.  No computer, except the initial one you connect to, to get into the TOR network, knows your IP address.  The thing about the TOR network, is it is slower than a direct connect through your ISP.

The TOR Network is ran by volunteers that share their bandwidth.  However, when I use this, I will not use it for critical communications like with the bank, credit card company, etc.  It is supposedly secure, but I won't take the chance, when it comes to my banking, etc info

Now for your comment "I have comcast and they use a dynamic IP.. They were not able to tell me how often their server updates it".  The tech doesn't know what he or she is talking about.  You can determine when your IP will change, if nothing ever would go wrong.  The tech should have been able to tell you this.  When you get an IP address from your ISP, it is called a "lease".  You can see the lease information yourself.  Open a command window and enter "IPCONFIG /ALL" (no quotes).  You'll see, within the stuff on the screen something like this:

   Lease Obtained. . . : Sunday, June 22, 2014 7:29:31 AM
   Lease Expires . . . : Sunday, December 12, 2021 10:29:37 PM

The "Lease Expires" is when the IP address you have is released, and you'd get a new one, in theory.  Sometimes, you'll get the same one.  If you loose power, you could get a new IP address, and other circumstances will give you a new IP.

There are ways to reset it:

1.  Do a power cycle.  Unplug the power cord to your router/modem for 2 minutes.  When it starts, you should have a new IP.  If your router/modem from comcast had batteries in it, then the batteries will have to be removed, I think.  Or just use one of the following.  My router/modem doesn't have batteries, but a friend that had TWC/RR had batteries in his router/modem.

2.  Do a hard reset.  Somewhere on your router/modem, there should be a recessed button, a little bigger than a paperclip.  Press and hold it until the lights blink on and off.  That should set your router/modem back to factory spects, and thus a new IP.  But I recommend #3, if it is available.

3.  My router/modem, when I connect to it, has a "reboot" button on the screen.  When I click it, it resets/reboots the router/modem, and the IP is reset.  Yours might have this one.  But if it does, make sure that you (or family members) aren't downloading anything, etc, because the download will abort.

4.  There are proxy servers that will hide your IP from distant sites, similar to the TOR network.

 

Oh yea, and TOR is free.

Best of luck.

 

Hi, I tried 1 and 2 and did a whatsmyipaddress...still comes up the same.

As far a 3.. which screen has the reboot button? When I connect to my modem (i have a separate apple router) I do not see anything

on my computer screen

 

Next question... how do I get TOR and how do you switch back and forth between TOR and you regular IP

 

Thanks

Ken



#7 kenshireen

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 02:28 PM

I was going to dl TOR but I saw that the plug-ins won't work... also I want to pay me bills on a secure line.

So how would I switch off between TOR and the Comcast IP

 

Thank you



#8 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 03:46 PM

Personally, I use two different browsers.  I use firefox for my non-TOR browsing, and then use COMODO IceDragon for TOR.  I don't use the bundled package with the browser.

This info might help, it's my onedrive cloud drive:

https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=1ddb2ae62401e5c8&id=1DDB2AE62401E5C8%21107&ithint=folder,.pdf&authkey=!AMutPsXTsTco3Fg

Best of Luck.

 

PDF reader necessary.


Edited by scotty_ncc1701, 23 June 2014 - 03:48 PM.


#9 kenshireen

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 05:52 PM

Personally, I use two different browsers.  I use firefox for my non-TOR browsing, and then use COMODO IceDragon for TOR.  I don't use the bundled package with the browser.

This info might help, it's my onedrive cloud drive:

https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=1ddb2ae62401e5c8&id=1DDB2AE62401E5C8%21107&ithint=folder,.pdf&authkey=!AMutPsXTsTco3Fg

Best of Luck.

 

PDF reader necessary.

I need some more help... I use IE with my Comcast IP... How would I set up TOR with lets say chrome... I haven't downloaded TOR yet.

I am not sure what to download and how I will make TOR the isp for chrome only... Can you help explain



#10 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 07:00 PM

Just download the Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR.  Go to the link shown in the instructions, click on Windows, then select, "Vidalia Bridge Bundle".

COMODO DRAGON has the same code base as GOOGLE CHROME.  So the basic instructions would be the same for GOOGLE CHROME, as for COMODO DRAGON.  Just install GOOGLE CHROME like normal (I don't know if it can be installed in the "portable" mode like COMODO DRAGON.  Then in the instructions for COMODO DRAGON, find "* Don't run the program yet".  Then follow the instructions from that point forward.  In order to force GOOGLE CHROME to use Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR, this:

--proxy-server="socks5://localhost:9050"

Must be added to the end of the command in the "target" box in the created shortcut.

I use two browsers, why?

1.  It isolates my "regular" browsing, e.g. banks, BC, etc from my Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing.  Remember, that the TOR network are ran by volunteers that share their bandwidth, so it's a good idea to keep that in mind, and never use it for critical sites like your bank, credit cards, etc.

2.  Since I use FIREFOX and COMODO ICE DRAGON, I use a different theme in COMODO ICE DRAGON, BRIGHT RED, to warn me that I started, and are currently using COMODO ICE DRAGON.  Although not required, I recommend it.

3.  I only start Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing when it is needed, not at Windows startup.  It can take a bit to get the connection to the Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR network.  On average, once I try and start Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR, it takes about 2-3 minutes for it to completely connect.  Depending on the person (even me), the wait can be fustrating, at times.  

4.  Once I have it all setup, I take one additional step.  I get to my desired search engine, and bookmark it on the bookmark toolbar, then I change my home page to:

http://whatismyipaddress.com/

This way, when I start up my Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing, it will tell me what my ipaddress is, and where I connected into.  You can use the above address even on your non-Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR.

Finally, it is possible to use the same browser for both regular browsing and also Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing, and to flip between them, it is a simple mouse click.  But I don't recommend it, because what if, for example, you are wanting to go to your bank, and you thought you were on your "normal" connection, but you were in fact using your Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing?

Just as I was ready to post this (click the button), I saw your PM.  I'll read it and see if this answered your questions.

Best of luck.



#11 kenshireen

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 07:23 PM

Just download the Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR.  Go to the link shown in the instructions, click on Windows, then select, "Vidalia Bridge Bundle".

COMODO DRAGON has the same code base as GOOGLE CHROME.  So the basic instructions would be the same for GOOGLE CHROME, as for COMODO DRAGON.  Just install GOOGLE CHROME like normal (I don't know if it can be installed in the "portable" mode like COMODO DRAGON.  Then in the instructions for COMODO DRAGON, find "* Don't run the program yet".  Then follow the instructions from that point forward.  In order to force GOOGLE CHROME to use Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR, this:

--proxy-server="socks5://localhost:9050"

Must be added to the end of the command in the "target" box in the created shortcut.

I use two browsers, why?

1.  It isolates my "regular" browsing, e.g. banks, BC, etc from my Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing.  Remember, that the TOR network are ran by volunteers that share their bandwidth, so it's a good idea to keep that in mind, and never use it for critical sites like your bank, credit cards, etc.

2.  Since I use FIREFOX and COMODO ICE DRAGON, I use a different theme in COMODO ICE DRAGON, BRIGHT RED, to warn me that I started, and are currently using COMODO ICE DRAGON.  Although not required, I recommend it.

3.  I only start Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing when it is needed, not at Windows startup.  It can take a bit to get the connection to the Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR network.  On average, once I try and start Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR, it takes about 2-3 minutes for it to completely connect.  Depending on the person (even me), the wait can be fustrating, at times.  

4.  Once I have it all setup, I take one additional step.  I get to my desired search engine, and bookmark it on the bookmark toolbar, then I change my home page to:

http://whatismyipaddress.com/

This way, when I start up my Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing, it will tell me what my ipaddress is, and where I connected into.  You can use the above address even on your non-Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR.

Finally, it is possible to use the same browser for both regular browsing and also Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing, and to flip between them, it is a simple mouse click.  But I don't recommend it, because what if, for example, you are wanting to go to your bank, and you thought you were on your "normal" connection, but you were in fact using your Vidalia Bridge Bundle/TOR browsing?

Just as I was ready to post this (click the button), I saw your PM.  I'll read it and see if this answered your questions.

Best of luck.

I got TOR on my desktop...I deleted Comodo because it made IE disappear...but that doesn't matter since I am only using TOR for a single website.  My question is that I have the TOR folder on my desktop but to get the program to work I have to open the folder and click on start TOR.

Isn't there any way to get a shortcut or icon that would save me sthe step of having to open the folder and hit the Start TOR exec.

 

Thank you again






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