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This is bad. Is this bad? I think this is bad.


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#1 blondeandconfused

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 11:48 PM

Dell Optiplex GX620 Pentium D 3.0 Ghz dual core 4.0 GB RAM 500 GB HD running Win XP

 

Browsing onto one of my regular forums when the blue screen of death popped up.  It had the following message:

 

"A program has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer."

 

I'm sure you know what the rest says to the stop message.

 

The picture gives the details of the stop message.

Attached File  uhohsmall.JPG   79.96KB   0 downloads

 

Now, I've been having BIOS issues with this machine for a while.  When it first started, it was a low voltage message, and so all these weird BIOS issues kept popping up until I replaced the battery.  After I replaced the battery, everything was good for a couple of months.  Now, I'm getting all the same weird BIOS issues, except for the low voltage message.  

 

Is this the end?  Is my BIOS so corrupted I might as well dump the whole thing?  This is BAD timing, because I had originally planned to purchase a new computer this spring, but business went very far south and I no longer have the money I was going to use to buy a new computer.  Occasionally, when I first start the machine up, it makes growly noises, like a Chevy with a dead battery.  

 

 

 



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 12:03 AM

Sounds like you have more wrong than a dead CMOS battery.

 

May be the PSU or HDD, since you've stated it's making noises, There's not too many components that are noisy, other than fans.

 

Hopefully one of the Hardware experts can add an opinion here.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 zingo156

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:35 AM

Please tell us more about the strange bios issues you are having we need to know the specific issues. Open your computer case, look for blown or bulging capacitors on the motherboard/video card etc examples: https://www.google.com/search?q=blown+or+bulging+capacitors+motherboard&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=YTikU5CiF-fQ8AGzwIHoBw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg&biw=1272&bih=766


Edited by zingo156, 20 June 2014 - 09:03 AM.

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#4 blondeandconfused

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:33 AM

Hi, thanks.

 

I get weird random stuff - OS install mode enabled. IDE configuration is incorrect.  Those two are the most common.  Sometimes it just doesn't boot Windows and gives me the Press F1 to continue F2 for setup screen, sometimes it stops short of even signaling my monitor.  I checked it over pretty good when I replaced the battery, cleaned out all the dust and made she the motherboard looked clean.  Since my desk is right under my window, which is open almost all year round, I do routine dust removal from my computers.

I can give it another look.



#5 zingo156

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:40 AM

Issues at a bios level nearly always indicate a hardware issue. It could still be an issue with the battery coming lose or disconnecting which would reset the cmos. That might cause the press F1 to contiune or F2 for setup prompt. Do you leave the computer unplugged by chance? Or is it always plugged in? Definitely have a look at the mainboard for any sign of bad capacitors. Bad caps will cause strange issues.

 

As Cat1092 mentioned above, it is also possible there is a hard drive problem, failing drives may make noise and can cause post faults. Try to locate the growling noise, in most cases it is just a fan, when they warm up they sometimes quiet down. If you have a failing fan, it may cause the computer to run hot and cause parts to fail, capacitors wear much faster when heat builds up inside the case.


Edited by zingo156, 20 June 2014 - 12:40 PM.

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#6 Kilroy

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:54 AM

I'd lean more towards the Power Supply Unit (PSU) as cat1092 mentioned due to sound description.  If the error is 0x0000008E this KBA suggest a RAM issue.  Since the PSU connects to everything it can cause a wide range of issues.



#7 blondeandconfused

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 01:45 PM

I'm inclined to believe the power supply might be the issue, too.  Since the weather has been hot, I've been keeping the machine on standby, except when I'm using it.  It is always plugged into a battery backup.  Also, I have a desk fan that I blow on the machine when the hard drive starts to spin real fast.  Any Flash programs will make the thing scream.  

Any good tips for replacing the power supply?  I think I'll do that.  Last computer I had that blew the power supply totally borked my hard drive in the process.



#8 cat1092

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:54 PM

That's the thing about PSU's, when they go, sometimes will carry other components along, Sometimes the MB itself & other attached extras such as GPU's.

 

Though I can't give install advise, what I do know is that you should stick with one of the same wattage or higher. Stay away from ultra low cost brands, like the less than $30 models, OEM's includes better than that. You'll need the dimensions of your PSU to make sure that the new one fits.

 

If you have a digital camera, of a cell phone with one, be sure to take pictures of the area around the PSU & the cables to see how they go back. When removing, label your wires as they're removed. This can be done with masking tape if needed, beginning with the number 1, when you remove a connector, place a tag saying #1 on both the wire you removed & the place it's plugged into. Go up a number with every wire you detach, so you'll know how things are supposed to go back. This will save time & guesswork.

 

Sign up for Newegg promos, you'll then get exclusive promo discounts, as they carry a long line of PSU's, to meet most every need. At a minimum, get a 'Bronse' rated one, preferably a Silver or Gold (the latter costs more). Many goes with Bronze or Silver. These will hold up better, provide cleaner power, ensure that your components gets what's needed & not waste energy in doing so.

 

Decent ones start at $40-$50, it depends on what you have & your needs. My guess that one for an Optiplex will be a specially designed unit, not one like for typical tower PC's,

 

Here is a detailed instruction video on your model PC. Looks fairly simple. Be sure to touch a metal part on the outside of the computer before opening it.

 

 

Hope that this is helpful. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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