Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Dell Optiplex 980 start up problem


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 harkcomp

harkcomp

  • Members
  • 92 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 02:03 PM

A acquired a used three year old Dell Optiplex 980 from a friend who switched to newer equipment this year. 

I took it home...connected the system, pressed the start button on the tower and the "on" button on my flat screen monitor. The keyboard, monitor, and mouse lights are on. 

 

Very soon the colorful swirling Windows icon is slowly spinning center screen with the typical message that reads "WINDOWS IS STARTING UP". 

The four swirling icon colors come together and stop center screen......pause for a moment.......I then notice an almost un-noticable single "blip" of the icon.....Then the icon and "Windows is starting up" text suddenly disappear........and nothing............but a blank screen.

The screen acts like it is booting up Windows....tells me that Windows is starting.....a single faint blip and it's gone.....and a blank screen.

 

The Optiplex 980 is a 2 quad core, 2.33 ghz, 1600 GB hard drive, 4 GB of Ram and has Windows 7 on the system.

 

I don't know if this makes any difference or not, but one thing I noticed different between this newer Dell 980 system and my old was in the way the tower connected to my flat screen monitor.

The Dell 980 has a DVI-Input that does not look exactly like the DVI-input on my old tower. My old DVI connector had an 18 pin connector that consisted of two seperate groups of 9 pins stacked three wide three high and with a flat horizontal pin off to the side. There was also a matching connector on the underside of my monitor.

The newer Dell 980 has a similar DVI connector on the tower except that it has 59 pin DVI connector with no horizontal pin. This 59 pin connector had two very short cables on it and each ended with a blue VGA in-put connector on the end. I'm assuming this must be some kind of splitter used to connect more than one monitor.

I connected the 59 pin connector to the DVI port on the tower and the blue VGA connector to the VGA port on the underside of the flat screen monitor.

I figure this set up must be the way it works because otherwise I would have seen nothing at all in the monitor screen.

 

After several failed attempts to get the system to boot up I did an F8 and did a Pre-Boot System Assessment test which took about 30 minutes to complete.

About 3/4 of the way through the test a box suddenly pops up in the middle of the screen along with an audible chimming signal indicating a systems error message.

The message read:

ERROR CODE 0142

ERROR CODE 2000-0142

HARD DRIVE 0 - SELF TEST UNSUCCESSFUL. STATUS 49

ERROR CODE AND MESSAGE CAN BE USED TO HELP DIAGNOSE PROBLEM. 

 

I did a Google of this code and found that it is an error code which is caused by mis-configured systems files.

The article I read stated that there is a download from Dell that will fix the system of this error issue.

However, for me to download the fix I must first be able to boot the system.

 

So my questions are:

Is it possible that this error is what is keeping my system from booting up? 

If so, how can I download the cure if I'm not able to boot up? 

Is it possible that by using this wierd splitter between the monitor and tower that I'm not conntcting the system properly?

Or.....any other ideas as to what is causing my problem that causes the system to act like it is going to start up....but then suddenly shuts itself off. 

 

I apologize for my lengthy message,  but I wanted to be as thorough as possible. 

 

Thanks! 

 

Harkcomp

 

 

  

 

 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 wpgwpg

wpgwpg

  • Members
  • 1,149 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:US of A
  • Local time:05:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 02:32 PM

 I'd do a repair.  You can boot from a Windows 7 install disc or a repair disc to do the repair.  If you don't have either, you can go to another Windows 7 computer having 32 or 64 bit matching yours and make one.  To do that click Start -> Control Panel -> Backup and Restore -> Create system repair disc.  Insert a CD-R and it'll make it.  Then boot from it on your computer and do the repair.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#3 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,727 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:04:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 03:47 PM

I think I'd invite this "friend" over and ask for his assessment of what's wrong....what has historically been wrong....license/key data, install media....and such.

 

Louis



#4 harkcomp

harkcomp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 92 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:33 PM

 I'd do a repair.  You can boot from a Windows 7 install disc or a repair disc to do the repair.  If you don't have either, you can go to another Windows 7 computer having 32 or 64 bit matching yours and make one.  To do that click Start -> Control Panel -> Backup and Restore -> Create system repair disc.  Insert a CD-R and it'll make it.  Then boot from it on your computer and do the repair.

 

Good luck.

I've got a Windows install disc. Do I just pop it in....do a boot....press F8......go to System Configuration.....and click on the repair system selection?



#5 harkcomp

harkcomp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 92 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:37 PM

 

 I'd do a repair.  You can boot from a Windows 7 install disc or a repair disc to do the repair.  If you don't have either, you can go to another Windows 7 computer having 32 or 64 bit matching yours and make one.  To do that click Start -> Control Panel -> Backup and Restore -> Create system repair disc.  Insert a CD-R and it'll make it.  Then boot from it on your computer and do the repair.

 

Good luck.

I've got a Windows install disc. Do I just pop it in....do a boot....press F8......go to System Configuration.....and click on the repair system selection?

 

Is the repair just a bandaid fix?  I've read that even if I do a repair the hard drive will still need to be replaced eventually. 



#6 wpgwpg

wpgwpg

  • Members
  • 1,149 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:US of A
  • Local time:05:07 AM

Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:52 PM

 The repair attempts to fix corrupt Windows files and the file system.  That's software.  If the hard drive is failing, that's a hardware problem separate and apart from the realms of the repair.  At this point I haven't seen any SMART data about this drive so I don't see how we can conclude one way or the other.  Problem determination involves eliminating the possibilities one by one.  If you want to know the SMART data, download the DOS version of Seatools from Seagate's web site.  

 Getting back to the repair disc, you boot from it and select the repair option.  You DON'T press F8, that would be for when you're booting Windows from the computer's internal hard drive.  You reported having misconfigured system files, that's the kind of thing a repair disc would address.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users