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bootmgr Oddity


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#1 MelissaPleases

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:24 PM

I recently noticed that there are three instances of bootmgr on one of my secondary HDDs - not on the system drive. They're labeled bootmgr, bootmgr~3, and bootmgr~4. My questions are: Is it normal to have multiple instances of the bootmgr file? Are they supposed to be on a secondary drive, and not the system drive? Can these be deleted, or should I just leave well enough alone?

 

Thanks in advance! :)


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#2 wpgwpg

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:28 PM

 I'd leave well enough alone.  The potential costs are very high and the benefits are very low.  If you can't restrain yourself, you should definitely have a system backup.  If fact having a full system backup is something everyone should do anyway.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:09 PM

I have never seen this but you could download EasyBCD and select Edit Boot Menu to see if there is more than one Boot Manager listed. It may give you an idea of what is going on.

 

https://neosmart.net/Download/Register/1

 

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#4 TsVk!

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:12 PM

Have you ever had a OS installed on the secondary drive?



#5 MelissaPleases

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:21 PM

I'll give EasyBCD a try; and no - the drive has never been used for anything but storage.


Edited by MelissaPleases, 16 June 2014 - 06:21 PM.

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#6 TsVk!

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:28 PM

There is no reason for it to have bootmgr files. That is commonly cause by malware.

 

edit: there can be other explanations though, don't panic.


Edited by TsVk!, 16 June 2014 - 06:33 PM.


#7 TsVk!

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:36 PM

Don't delete anything without first confirming you have a valid bootmgr on your system drive. You can do this by physically unplugging your storage drive and then attempting to boot.



#8 MelissaPleases

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:39 PM

This is very strange... Screenshots below:

 

Attached File  Clipboard01.jpg   39.13KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  Clipboard02.jpg   35.37KB   0 downloads

 

I did have some issues some time back which forced me to recover my system drive - so I assume that's what EasyBCD means by (recovered). However, while my OS resides on my "C" drive, I'm pretty much lost as to why my "F" drive is listed as the Boot Drive?


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#9 MelissaPleases

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:41 PM

Don't delete anything without first confirming you have a valid bootmgr on your system drive. You can do this by physically unplugging your storage drive and then attempting to boot.

Thanks - if I need to, I'll give that a try.


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#10 TsVk!

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:48 PM

You had your storage drive attached when you restored your system image? This can happen then for unknown reasons...

 

I'm sure there's a fix for this somewhere, but I don't know it off the top of my head.

 

One thing you can do is remove the storage drive, boot from installation disk and recreate the bootmgr in the correct drive. Then you can go ahead and delete the erroneous bootmgr files.

 

Here's a vid how to create the bootmgr on the system drive with an install DVD.

 

TsVk!

 

edit: this is assuming your machine won't boot with the storage drive detached... if it will you can just go ahead and delete the bootmgrs on the storage, but that would also give the concern that there may be malware involved.


Edited by TsVk!, 16 June 2014 - 06:50 PM.


#11 MelissaPleases

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:17 PM

First of all, my sincere apologies for not reporting back here in a more timely manner. Real life does have its complications...

 

So, this is what happened: I disconnected all drives, with the exception of my system drive, and attempted to boot the system. Windows refused to even consider that possibility. I then reconnected my drives, one at a time, trying to boot the system with each new reconnect. In the end, when I had all drives reconnected, Windows would still not start. I tried Startup Repair, which failed. I tried a system restore, but Windows informed me that there were no restore points to restore from. (Windows lies - I set restore points frequently). I finally decided that since I don't store any data whatsoever on my system drive, I would go ahead and do a fresh install of Windows. For safety's sake, I moved all data from my internal storage drives to my external drive using an Ubuntu disk. I then did a clean install of Windows on a larger (1TB) drive, and brought all of my data files back to the internal drives.

 

I attempted, while still in the Linux shell, to delete the bootmgr files that had mysteriously appeared in strange places. According to Ubuntu, they were gone; however, Windows showed a locked file on two of my drives that Windows would not let me get rid of - Windows refused to even let me go near taking ownership of those files. They appeared to be the Ubuntu version of the recycle bin. At any rate, I was forced to reformat those drives in order to get rid of the files.

 

I'm happy to report that while the whole process was a royal pain in my behind, I now have a clean Windows install, and all of my drives are at the point they should be at. I do have another question, but it's unrelated to this topic, so I'll post it in the appropriate forum.

 

Thanks for all of your help - I truly don't know what I would do without this site.


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#12 wpgwpg

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:54 PM

 It's been my experience that if you install Windows 7 on one drive while you have another internal drive installed, that Windows can put the BCD (Boot Configuration Data) on the other drive.  That's probably what happened in your case.  Since you saved your data and reinstalled, it sounds like you've resolved your problem.  

 

 When you've gotten your system back like you want it, I urge you to get yourself an external hard drive and a good 3rd party backup program. You can set it up to do everything automagically at the time and frequency of your choice. 1 TB external hard drives are about $60 these days and a really good FREE backup program is the Easeus Todo Backup Free.  That can save you a lot of time and frustration the next time something like this happens. Sooner or later it happens to all computers for one reason or another.
 
 Good luck.

Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#13 MelissaPleases

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:29 PM

I'm looking into doing exactly that. I already have a Seagate 2TB external drive, and I'm considering the possibility of creating a partition on that drive solely for backups. I could get away with doing a weekly scheduled backup, since I seldom install new software - I already have everything I need at the moment. Question: Does the backup partition have to be the same size as the drive that is being backed up, or will it suffice to create a partition large enough to hold the existing system, programs, settings, etc., with a bit more room to spare?

 

Odd how when I got my first computer, and upgraded to my first ever HDD, I was dumbfounded that I had a whopping 20MB of space. I now have something approaching 7 TB, and I still want to get more... :lmao:


Edited by MelissaPleases, 10 July 2014 - 08:29 PM.

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#14 wpgwpg

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 02:54 PM

 No, the partition doesn't have to have a matching size.  It just has to have enough free space to hold the backup.  With a 2 TB external drive, I wouldn't think you'd have to worry.

 I agree about hard drive space; it's like closet space.  I think my first hard drive was 60 MB.  I remember folks paying $400 to add another 60 MB.  I just saw a 2 TB drive on sale in a store for $75.  My $180 tablet has 16 TB of flash memory storage, and it weighs less than a pound.  Makes you wonder where it'll all end up, doesn't it.  

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#15 MelissaPleases

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 08:44 PM

Thanks for the info - I suspected as much. And yes, I do wonder where it will all end up. As it is, people are walking around with handheld computers in the guise of a smart phone. Star Trek has come to life!! :D


Edited by MelissaPleases, 11 July 2014 - 08:45 PM.

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Case: CoolerMaster Storm Trooper Full ATX | Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z170X | CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K 8M Skylake Quad-Core | GPU: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB 512-Bit | PSU: EVGA 80 PLUS GOLD 850 W | RAM: Corsair Vengeance DDR4 SDRAM [4x8GB] Audio: Integrated Creative Sound Core 3D 5.1 | Internal Storage: Samsung 2 TB HDD | Seagate 1 TB HDD | Samsung 500GB SSD [x2] | Mushkin 500GB SSD | External Storage: Seagate 2TB | Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS324 Dual Layer

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