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MCSA (Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate) Questions...


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#1 David Ashcroft

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 05:16 PM

Hi everyone, sorry if this is in the wrong place, I have recently got my Microsoft Technology Associate certification in Network fundimentals and I am looking to continue this on with the MCSA (Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate) and then the MCSE (Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert). I was wondering what people think on me taking these other exams? Would it be worth it

I have been looking at my MCSA and I see that there are a few option available from here:http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-gb/mcsa-certification.aspx

Ideally I would like to do Windows Server 2012: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-gb/mcsa-windows-server-certification.aspx

I am confused as to how this works? Under Windows Server 2012 do I need to take all 3 exams (the 3 steps) in order to become MCSA certified? Also do I need to choose more than one OS, so for example Windows Server 2012 AND Windows 8? The site doesn’t really explain how many you need to get in order to get the MCSA qualification, if you could clear this up that would be great.

Thanks very much everyone in advance!!



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 06:30 PM

Yes you need to talk all three exams.

 

What is your current situation, and what is your end goal?



#3 David Ashcroft

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 10:17 AM

I have just finished University and I have a BSC Hons in Computing and I just want something more technical based that proves that I have what it takes! So I am going down the Microsoft Certification route.

 

Basically my goal is to get a job as an IT Engineer/ IT Administrator/ Network Administrator :) 



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 06:06 PM

I will give you that sad truth, the world does not work the way Microsoft certifies.  For example, any company that lets users and managers administer file shares is going to spend a lot of time restoring from back up.    A lot of what you will learn for the certifications will not be used in the real world.

 

Certifications will get an an interview, but expect to have a lot more learning once you start doing the job.  I'd advise you start getting real world experience as soon as possible.  The problem with real world experience is that it makes studying for the exams harder.



#5 David Ashcroft

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 06:40 PM

I can imagine just like any jobs, the way you learn and the way things are implemented in the real world are always going to be different.

 

I have been working in IT since the age of 13 as an IT tech part time. But i want these certifications just to back everything up, also the majority of the tech support places i am looking at show that they are Microsoft Professionals usually in the footer of their site, so it just will look good on the CV, it will show i have passion, drive, motivation etc, at least that is what i am hoping! :) 



#6 Intalex

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 10:16 PM

Not too many people think about this but if you would like to diversify yourself, you might also want to add a Mac OS IT certification.



#7 Kilroy

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 08:11 AM

The only thing I'd have against the Mac OS certification is that it has limited application.  Unless you are looking to work for a company that is currently using Macs, a majority are not, you might be better off putting your efforts else where, such as security, ITIL, or project management.



#8 Intalex

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 02:58 PM

Sure, Mac OS certs have a niche market but that does not mean that they are not desirable in the marketplace. I have been seeing more companies post job descriptions where they are either requiring or prefer both Windows and Mac knowledge.

 

My point is that it does not hurt to have one as you are showing a potential employer that you are diversified in both areas.






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