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Linux on Toshiba Laptop?


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#1 TempleCat

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 04:28 AM

I have decided to try Linux on my Toshiba 755 Satellite laptop.  I will have to replace the motherboard and hard drive.  Any clues on what the best ones are to look for?

Planning on using an SSI.



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 04:37 AM

You're not replacing your mobo & HDD to use Linux? unrelated right?



#3 OldPhil

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:13 AM

About to ask the same thing!


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#4 wpgwpg

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 11:08 AM

 I've run and installed Mint Linux on my Toshiba Satellite L755 without modifications of any kind.  It works just fine, just remember that if you want Windows and Linux to coexist, you'll replace the Windows boot mechanism with the Grub loader.  That will work fine, but there's a restriction about changing partition sizes that you have to be very careful about.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#5 TempleCat

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 04:40 PM

When I was using the laptop originally a couple of years ago, I was first told by the tech that the hard drive was bad. So it was sent back to Toshiba for replacement just before the warranty expired. Then it had issues a few months later, one person I talked to said the hard drive was bad again. If I sent it in again, money wise I may as well buy a new one, so I bought an Acer. Quite a while later, I decided to fix it anyway, to use as a backup or whatever, and another tech at the same store told me the motherboard was bad. So basically I'm planning on hopefully finding a good reliable motherboard, also thinking of going with an SSI for hard drive for better performance. And I've always wanted to go Linux as I've read and heard many good things about that system. So as a hobby interest, I would like to do this, without Windows.

One other problem I had was that the battery would sometimes not stay connected or something, as I would have to remove it and put it back in, sometimes more than once to get it to even work. No answer was given about that issue. I tried holding it in tight and duct-taping it tight :) That didn't help either, any ideas there? Is there a way I can just run it plugged in to the wall, without the battery in it? I tried and it won't allow me to run it without the battery installed, for whatever. reason. I don't need to run the battery anyway, as I'm usually plugged in.

And to top it off, one time I got advice from someone here and did what they told me, and I ended up paying a tech to remove quite a load of viruses. Someone does that again and I will have it traced by the law. That was not cool at all...be nice or don't bother me.

#6 wpgwpg

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:07 PM

 I guess you know that laptop mobos are proprietary.  That could get expensive, and then you still have some of the other problems you reported so I'd think you'd be better off buying a new laptop.  I have run my laptop without the battery, but unless you're going to be in one place most of the time, that kind of defeats the purpose of having a laptop, doesn't it?  

 One question, I assume this is a typo but you said SSI; I assume you meant SSD.  

 

 Linux has come a long way in recent years, and I like it a lot.  However there're still some things you could have difficulty finding drivers for, so check that out well before investing in expensive hardware.  In my case I have a Canon Lide 100 scanner, Canon IP1600 printer, and an Inland PCIe USB 3 card that I can't find Linux drivers for with Ubuntu and Mint.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#7 NickAu

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:22 PM

 

I can't find Linux drivers for with Ubuntu and Mint.

 

Have you tried Ndiswrapper, A program bundled with Ubuntu for running Windows drivers.
 
Step 1: Open a command line Terminal (Applications, Accessories, Terminal) and type sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install ndiswrapper-utils followed by "Enter", which installs a utilities package for running Ndiswrapper,

Step 2: Type echo -e "blacklist bcm43xx\nblacklist b43\nblacklist b43legacy\nblacklist ssb" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist in Terminal and press "Enter." This step make the drivers conflict impossible.

Step 3: Type sudo ndiswrapper -i ~/drivers/drivername.inf (replacing /drivers/drivername.inf with the location and name of your driver) and press "Enter." Type ndiswrapper -l into Terminal and press "Enter." If the driver was correctly installed, you get one of the following messages: "Installed ndis drivers: (name of driver) driver present, hardware present" or "(name of driver) : driver installed device ({Chipset ID}) present."


Try this in a virtual machine first or make sure you have backups before attempting it on your machine, Lets see you do that in Windows.


Edited by NickAu1, 13 June 2014 - 06:04 PM.


#8 cat1092

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 11:57 PM

After reading about this laptop & all of the things that needs fixing, I feel that TempleCat would be far better off going to a local discount store, such as WalMart & dropping a little over $300 for a brand spanking new one. And yes an SSD could be added if desired.

 

Used notebook parts are more generally costly than desktop PC ones are, because first, there's fewer of them, secondly there's so many different models, unless a whole line of a given model is 10+ years old & being sold as scrap, it's going to be hard to find a MB to fit a particular computer. It's also *likely* going to be used, with only a DOA warranty, plus the battery, which unless genuine is going to be an off brand that may or may not last half as long as the original.

 

And finally who knows what else is wrong with it? Sounds like a lemon was purchased from the go. Normally Toshiba brand notebooks are quality, but just like a fruit tree, there's always going to be a rotten one.

 

In fact, I have Linux Mint 17 on my Toshiba Satellite A665-S6086, actually my wife uses it more than me & I wanted her to have a secure computer to run. Until Sunday, it was running Mint 13, it was the last of the three that I installed 17 on. Runs almost as fast as Windows 7 on the SSD after some tweaking. She actually picked up on Mint faster than I, because she was computer illiterate & hadn't been exposed to Windows too much. The only thing wrong with the notebook is that a couple of keys are not working, so added a USB keyboard that I has laying around.

 

Seriously, I'd think long & hard before sinking a lot of cash into what sounds to be a broken notebook.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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