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No VGA Input Signal


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#1 Jubilee77

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 03:50 PM

I have an HP Pavilion a1023c (Product # PW7100AA) running XP Home Edition bout several years ago from Costco.

Two weeks ago it fell down but worked fine. Now every time I turn it on, the monitor displays the following information.

Monitor Status - VGA Input:  No Input Signal.

 

Ten (10) seconds later, it displays "Monitor going to sleep".

 

I tested the monitor using a friend's computer and the monitor works fine.

 

I opened up the computer and cleaned dust off the fans.

However, the same message still shows up.

 

Because it fell, I'm inclined to think it's a simple hardware problem.  

A little research indicates it could be the graphics card but the internal hardware pictures

I have seen online doesn't look like my computer so I can't identify it to attempt a replacement..

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 05:16 PM

According to Google, this is a desktop in a tower so it is highly probable that you have disconnected or damaged something if it fell.

 

The simplest - and cheapest - thing to do is to take the side off it and check all around inside for any misplaced or loose connectors and re-seat things like the RAM sticks and any cards mounted on the motherboard, such as video cards. Also check the hard drive connectors - at both ends.

 

But BEFORE you go inside the computer, switch the power off and disconnect from the wall supply, then press the 'ON' switch and hold it in for a few seconds to drain any electrical charge in the power supply, and finally touch a part of the metal case with your hand to neutralise any static electricity.

 

Your video card is easily identified, if you are using an add-on card rather than the on-board graphics. It is the card sticking out of the motherboard, at right angles to it, that your video lead plugs into.

 

The simplest way to determine if you have damaged your video card is to beg or borrow a spare card from somebody and plug it in instead of your own. You will probably have to install the drivers for the borrowed card as well. If the monitor works with the borrowed card, then your's is probably damaged. But if the monitor doesn't work with the borrowed card, it probably isn't the card.

 

When you remove your card it should be easy to identify as there should be a maker's name and model number printed on it.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Jubilee77

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:19 PM

According to Google, this is a desktop in a tower so it is highly probable that you have disconnected or damaged something if it fell.

 

The simplest - and cheapest - thing to do is to take the side off it and check all around inside for any misplaced or loose connectors and re-seat things like the RAM sticks and any cards mounted on the motherboard, such as video cards. Also check the hard drive connectors - at both ends.

 

But BEFORE you go inside the computer, switch the power off and disconnect from the wall supply, then press the 'ON' switch and hold it in for a few seconds to drain any electrical charge in the power supply, and finally touch a part of the metal case with your hand to neutralise any static electricity.

 

Your video card is easily identified, if you are using an add-on card rather than the on-board graphics. It is the card sticking out of the motherboard, at right angles to it, that your video lead plugs into.

 

The simplest way to determine if you have damaged your video card is to beg or borrow a spare card from somebody and plug it in instead of your own. You will probably have to install the drivers for the borrowed card as well. If the monitor works with the borrowed card, then your's is probably damaged. But if the monitor doesn't work with the borrowed card, it probably isn't the card.

 

When you remove your card it should be easy to identify as there should be a maker's name and model number printed on it.

 

Chris Cosgrove

Hi Chris,

I checked the location you suggested but nothing is sticking out like you suggested. The specs says the video graphics is "Integrated with up to 128 MB allocated video memory".

I don't get it.

Any thoughts?



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 09:05 AM

Odds are something broke in the fall.

 

Integrated means that it is built on the system board.  You might be able to pick up a low end video card, but you may have issues because frequently the on board video needs to be disabled in BIOS before an add on card will work.

 

How much time, effort, and funds you put into this will be up to you.



#5 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 06:00 PM

Computers are not meant to be dropped and as Kilroy says it's odds on that something broke in the fall. Since you have integrated graphics (ie the video circuitry is part of the motherboard) it could be a crack in the mobo or a solder connection to the video outputs has failed. It could even be a hard drive failure.

 

Are you getting any video at all when you switch on ?  Can you see the BIOS screen - that's the one with the maker's or the motherboard brand all over it before you get the monitor 'No display' message ?.

 

If you are not seeing the BIOS screen the damage is almost certainly directly related to the video. If you are seeing the BIOS screen but then 'No output' it may well be hard drive related. Probably the easiest way to check is to see if you can borrow a basic video card from a friend and try that before you rush out and buy one. The BIOS does not always need to be re-set when you put a separate video card in.

 

Kilroy's point about the time, effort and money you are willing to put in is also valid. You say the computer is several years old - time for a replacement ?

 

Chris Cosgrove






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