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Someone got my Debit Card Number


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9 replies to this topic

#1 pcpunk

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:28 AM

My bank called me this morning and said that someone used my card in France, I am in the US.  I am going to change my password on Ebay and Amazon but other than that I don't do much online.

 

What should I look for as the culprit, resent transactions?  I just don't know where to be more proactive.

 

Should I contact all the people that have my card on file?  I am getting a new card of course but would like to be more aware as I don't have a lot of money and my health is not good. 


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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:39 AM

As it seems that the bank has already disabled the old card and issued a new card you should only need to contact people who charge the card regularly.  No need to contact everyone that has the old card on file, it won't work and they should contact you for a different card when the transaction fails.



#3 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

The best thing to do, is just cancel the card, and have a new one, with a completely different number be issued.

What I do is this:

1.  I have three accounts:
1.1.  Main account - Where my pay comes into.
1.2.  Online purchases - For online purchases.
1.3.  Bill pay - For paying my bills.

When my pay comes in, I transfer only the amount needed to pay bills into accout (1.3), plus maybe $1-$2.  I do this just before I pay the bills.  This limits how much can be stolen.

I also have the other accout (1.2) to make purchases on-line.  I get to the checkout, then in another window, go to my bank, transfer the amount needed, plus maybe $1-$2, go back to the site, and complete the transaction.

Add to the above, if there are any suspected "funny" transactions on my accounts, I cancel ALL THE CARDS, have them reissue new cards with completely new numbers.

Even if I don't have "funny" transactions, I have my bank reissue me new cards, about every three months, with new numbers on them.  In this case what I normally do is:

1.  Cancel the card on account (1.2) above.
2.  Get the new card on account (1.2) above.
3.  Activate the new card on account (1.2) above.
4.  Repeat the above for the other two accounts, one at a time, until I have the three new cards.

I think that if you use the multiple account system I use, your problems will be reduced, because you control the amount of money that's available in the account.  Yes, it takes a little more effort, but it protects you!

Best of luck!



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 10:49 AM

I think the solution mentioned by scotty_ncc1701 is a bit extreme, specifically having new cards issued every three months.

 

There are credit cards that allow you to create one time use or limited card numbers that are tied to your main account.  A debit card is different because it is tied to your actual money.  Myself, I use credit cards that are paid off monthly to give me the security I need when purchasing online.  I keep close tracks to the charges to ensure I know what is being charged and that it matches charges I've made.

 

I can recommend both Citibank and Discover for their fraud protection.  If anything they are a bit over protective.



#5 pcpunk

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 11:28 AM

Thanks for all the help guys.  Unfortunately I don't have much money lol so I will just be very careful as to what I am doing.

 

Should I contact all the people that have my card on file?:  This question was to make all these vendors aware that MAYBE something is not good with there security? or is this just a waste of time.

 

Do you guys think it is safer to give a human a number or to use a payment co. like Paypal, kind of just a general opinion question?

 

Does the transaction being overseas tell you anything?  My last transaction was Ebay months ago.

 

Thanks again it's good to have all this support!


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#6 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 12:07 PM

It's true that some don't agree with my steps, which is perfectly AOK.

But the steps have kept my money secure and safe.  I've had many friends and acquiesces that have lost money by not taking proactive approach to protecting their accounts.

For instance, a non-profit organization screwed up on my renewal and attempted to transaction twice.  The initial transaction went through.  Because of the way I do things, the second transaction didn't go through, that was attempted a few hours later.  I then immediately canceled the card, and had a new one, with a new number issued.  A few days later, a third attempted transaction happened, from the non-profit organization.  Of course the third time also failed, because the card was canceled, but my bank notified me, because they keep record of all card numbers, and of course, attempted transactions.

Remember in the past six months or so, the situation with Target and others?  It's better to be safe and sorry.

Should (pcpunk) contact all that has his card?  If it's canceled, it really isn't necessary, because they can't get to the money.  If a transaction is attempted, it shouldn't go through.  However, if the bank allows it, and the card is canceled, the bank is legally on the hook to give you your money back, and if appropriate, any "overdraft" fees.  If the last transaction was months ago with EBay as (pcpunk) says, then that would be a red flag, if it shows up overseas.  It could be any company that has your card number that got hacked, for example.

Now, if the people that have your (pcpunk) card automatically pulls out their money out, I'd suggest you (pcpunk) change things around.  For me, on my bills, I push the payment to the payee, from the bank.  All the payees I send things to accept electronic payments, and usually takes 1 business day to get to them.

Best of luck.



#7 quietman7

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 01:22 PM

Since your bank called you to advise of the fraudulent transaction, they most likely already referred the issue to their investigators in the Fraud Department. The investigators will assign a case number and attempt to identify the perpetrators...in some cases working with local or federal law enforcement agencies. As a victim, you can contact the Fraud Department and request a copy of the case report.

Look closely at the next couple months of credit card statements to ensure you are not charged for the fraudulent transaction. Financial institutions are generally reliable in making the proper billing adjustments and credits but they do make errors from time to time.
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#8 Kilroy

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 02:01 PM

There is no point in notifying the organizations who have the card on file.  The are not going to look into their security just because you notify them.

 

Nothing is safe, if you hand the card to your waitress or enter it over the Internet to PayPal.  You have make it as safe as you can and rely on the protections in place to safe guard your funds.

 

The transaction overseas isn't any real indicator of anything other than that's where they attempted to use it.

 

Credit card companies want to make it as convenient as possible to use credit/debit cards and security isn't convenient.



#9 pcpunk

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 02:30 PM

Since your bank called you to advise of the fraudulent transaction, they most likely already referred the issue to their investigators in the Fraud Department. The investigators will assign a case number and attempt to identify the perpetrators...in some cases working with local or federal law enforcement agencies. As a victim, you can contact the Fraud Department and request a copy of the case report.

Look closely at the next couple months of credit card statements to ensure you are not charged for the fraudulent transaction. Financial institutions are generally reliable in making the proper billing adjustments and credits but they do make errors from time to time.

I am glad you mentioned this as the person whom helped me at the bank would/could not provide me with the info. for that incident!

 

I am suffering some terrible health problems so it is not easy making the best decisions, thanks for the help!


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#10 quietman7

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 04:44 PM

You're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.
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