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Computer Crashes and Event Viewer Warnings/Errors


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#1 cvasale

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:09 AM

My computer has recently (in the past 1-2 weeks) started crashing at least 1-2 times a day.  The crash results in a blue screen where at the bottom it does a physical memory dump of some sort -- the screen is only up for a few seconds.  This mostly occurs when playing some sort of video game (WoW, Wildstar, or Smite).  I checked the event viewer and I'm receiving constant (multiple times a second) warnings of a WHEA-Logger source for my PCI Express Root Port Vendor ID:Device ID: 0x8086:0x3405.  The device ID per the device manager seems to link with (Intel® 5520/5500/X58 I/O Hub to ESI Port - 3405. 

 

I'm not sure if this is the cause of my crashes, however.  I checked around online and some people seem to have solved it by updating their Intel chipset drivers however when I run the Intel utility it says my driver is current and valid.  

 

My windows troubleshooting tool has indicated that I've received recent video hardware failures.

 

I've attached my DXDiag dump.  I'm running Windows 7 with an i7 920, 8Gig RAM, AMD Radeon R9 290 graphics card.

 

Please let me know what additional information you need from me -- Thanks in advance for the help!

 

 

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#2 dicke

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:21 AM

Welcome,

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff560537(v=vs.85).aspx

Indicates that the error message is generated by a hardware error

Your message identifies a video hardware failure

If you have another way to generate video for the system [motherboard chip set, another graphics card] to see if that solves the problem it would confirm a bad card.

Keep us posted


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#3 wpgwpg

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 10:21 AM

 Could this problem be caused by high temperatures?  Have you checked?  I use SpeedFan, but there're other apps for checking temps as well.  If they're getting over 50 degrees C, that could be a problem.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#4 dicke

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 10:44 AM

Heat is always a possibility. The error messages are pointing in a different direction. I'd like to resolve that issue first, then check to see if there are any more. One problem at a time.


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:42 PM.

Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#5 wpgwpg

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 10:56 AM

 I hear you.  It just occurs to me that high temps can cause a GPU (as well as other components) to fail.  It's a lot cheaper to fix temp problems than to replace video cards.   :)

 


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:43 PM.

Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#6 cvasale

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 11:39 AM

Welcome,

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff560537(v=vs.85).aspx

Indicates that the error message is generated by a hardware error

Your message identifies a video hardware failure

If you have another way to generate video for the system [motherboard chip set, another graphics card] to see if that solves the problem it would confirm a bad card.

Keep us posted

 

Can you give me some guidance as to how I can test with another option for video for the system?  The crashing doesn't occur every time I play/load a game so it's really a hit or miss -- I can't predict when it'll happen.  I have my old GTX card still that I could re-slot however that would just cause my games to be almost unplayable because it can't handle them.  

 

My GPU is running at 93-95c which is super hot but 95c is around the default temp for my card when it's in-use per my reading up on the internet. 

 

I noticed that the fan on the right side of my CPU coolermaster isn't running and my CPU temps are pretty high (91 & 100c).  I'm fairly certain based off of that that my cooler has failed so I've purchased a new one and am having it overnighted.  That being said, I haven't received any sound alerts from my computer nor any events relating to overheating.  



#7 wing987

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:43 PM

Is it possible that you encounter problems only when playing graphic intensive games, and only after sufficient period of time to heat up the components? 

 

My concern is that the GPU is shutting down due to overheating, which can lead to a failed hardware problem (like flipping a coin, it may restart fine once or a hundred times before it just finally gives out).  The use of a system on low processing programs may bring the heat withing the chassis to a higher level, but nothing to worry about.  And then when increased by intense play the GPU overheats, and the problem occurs (and this also making it harder to track down, as if you start plaing intensly immediately it takes longer to go from room temp to overheated then if it was already warmed up by running low intensity apps).

 

(This route is what I would choose, as it addresses the problems in order of "least cost to replace" on the average system...Additionally, it is recommended that you follow the instructions of dicke, your original helper on the issue. I refuse to interrupt his process and I am just providing an opinion based on the facts at hand)

 

If this seems like a possibility I would first check for and replace any and all bad components for the cooling system.  The remaining components in the chassis needs dusted out (with canned air designed for computers ONLY) to ensure the coating of dust does not add to the heat problem. Focus on the heat sinks too. Re-arrange the cabling if possible to get them out of the way of the air flow and get the maximum possible cooling.  Then you test your system again, if you get another failure you need to test on a known good (EMPHASIS....KNOWN good) GPU, and replace if the problem is not replicated on the good GPU. If the good GPU fails as well you may need to look into upgrading your cooling system (if the chassis still gets blazing hot) or looking into another component that may be bad or affected by poor heat dissapation (IE: is the CPU properly connected to the heat sink? Do you have a bad or loose RAM stick?)

 

@dicke - I would agree with you on one problem at a time as well as the approach you took, but the heat listed after your post concerns me and adjusts my opinion on how to troubleshoot this particular system since the errors may be a chain reaction started by heat problems.  I apologize if it seems I am just walking all over your process.


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:38 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.

-- Windows 7 Ultimate on custom built system, Windows 10 on under powered laptop. Sophos UTM 9, Ubuntu Server and Windows Server 2008 R2. HyperV Virtualization --

 

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#8 wpgwpg

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 02:10 PM

 

@dicke - I would agree with you on one problem at a time as well as the approach you took, but the heat listed after your post concerns me and adjusts my opinion on how to troubleshoot this particular system since the errors may be a chain reaction started by heat problems.  I apologize if it seems I am just walking all over your process.

 

 I don't mean to be walking over anybody's process, but the symptoms the OP described are classic signs of heat.  That's why I asked about it, and with temps in the 90s, it's obvious that's a very significant part of the problem.  I once asked Toshiba how hot things could get before circuit damage could be a problem.  They said 70 C.  YMMV.

 


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#9 dicke

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 02:56 PM

Greater wisdom applied to the problem is always welcome

 

 

That's how I learn

Based on the OPs response of the temps - ball's in your court, I'll watch


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:37 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.

Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#10 cvasale

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 03:23 PM

I've dusted out  my computer recently and I have 5 fans on my case not including those on the CPU cooler and GPU themselves.  I'm getting mixed information online as to what an appropriate temperature for my graphics card is.  It idles out of games perfectly fine but jumps to ~95c when loaded as I mentioned.  I did read a thread where it was said that this temperature is normal for this card.  My CPU temperatures on the other hand do seem very high which is why I've purchased a replacement CPU cooler and will see when its installed what the impact is.

 

To your question/theory about it heating up over time, I do recall that my computer has crashed after moderate playing time -- but as I said I haven't gotten any warnings about heat (other than my obvious high temps) -- aren't there usually audible beeps that come from my computer?

 

I don't know any other ways to make my GPU any cooler than it can be with my fans -- are there options for this?  How do you cool a hot graphics card outside of putting it in front of an AC unit?  haha

 

Thanks to each of you for your help btw


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:35 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.


#11 wpgwpg

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 03:24 PM

 Nobody knows it all, Dickie, especially in technology.  That's why I spend a whole lot of time in the forums.  The pace of change is staggering these days.  I'm close to your age, FWIW.

 

 OK, now that we're agreed about the temps, I see the OP is already working on his fans.  That's a good start.  Cleaning the dust out is another.  I use cans of compressed gas that you can buy at stores selling computers and a lot of office supply stores too.  They're not expensive.  Pay careful attention to the fins on the CPU and GPU fans because dust really clogs them up over time.  Another thing is the thermal paste on the CPU cooling fan if the computer's over 2-3 years old.  It's not expensive either, I paid $11.99 for a tube of Artic Silver paste.

 

Mod Edit Note To All:  It is not necessary to use the quote button to respond to what someone said.  It's just common sense...if you can read the comments and follow the thread flow...you don't need to use a quotebox to post a comment.  I've removed several in the hope that each of you would pick up on this and I don't see where it has hurt my understanding of what is being conveyed by each respondent.  Thanks :). - Hamluis.


Edited by hamluis, 11 June 2014 - 05:42 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.

Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:




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