Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

how to choose a SSD


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 MADDxDOGG

MADDxDOGG

  • Members
  • 29 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 10 June 2014 - 04:32 PM

m thinking about upgrading to a solid state and i dont know where to start my computer uses sata and its a desktop


Edited by hamluis, 10 June 2014 - 05:13 PM.
Changed title - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 54,820 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 10 June 2014 - 05:12 PM

Start by reading a bit...after you list what it is that makes you think that a SSD would be an improvement to your system.

 

My SSDs are only used as Windows drives...no data storage at all, all programs installed on same drive as Windows.  I don't give a fig about the alleged speed differential, I just believe that a drive with non-moving parts..is a heck of better place to install my O/S and programs than an electro-mechanical hard drive.  When the price comes down more, I suppose that I will stop storing data files on hard drives and move those to SSDs, but right now the capacity of a hard drive is a clear advantage for data storage.

 

When I bought mine (all Corsairs)...I just did some background reading on the problems that some drives were having and ruled those out.  After that, it was just value and price point at the time of purchase.

 

I don't believe any "brand" is better than another for what I want...so I don't suggest a given manufacturer over another.

 

Louis



#3 MADDxDOGG

MADDxDOGG
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 29 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 10 June 2014 - 05:20 PM

Thank you for the reply.. Do SSD drives require special connections of some sort or does it connect like a regular 7200 rpm drive



#4 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,278 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 11 June 2014 - 08:52 AM

SSDs use the same SATA connections as a mechanical drive.  I recommend 120GB as a minimum size for a Windows drive.  If you go much smaller you will be forever clearing off the drive to make space.

 

I've only used the Intel drives myself.

 

Maximum PC currently recommends the SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series which is rated very well at New Egg.



#5 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

I have had the best luck with reliability with Intel drives, Samsung has been up there as well. As for the least reliable, OCZ vertex II's and III's seemed to fail within a 6 month period on average in my experience in the retail world (I can not speak for OCZ's newer drives but those 2 versions seemed to have issues). I have not tried PNY, Crucial, or many others that have good reviews, generally reviews give a good idea of performance and reliability.

 

Somethings to think about with ssd's is how much data you will be writing to the drive daily and what speed you are looking for and then cost/budget. There are 3 different drive types currently, SLC, MLC, TLC.

 

SLC is the most expensive but also can handle the highest per cell write cycle generally 10,000 to 100,000 writes to a cell before failure. These drives are best for enterprise level data writing constantly.

 

MLC is the next best in reguards to the max number of writes with averages of 3,000 to 10,000 cycles per cell before failure. eMLC may have higher write cycles per cell but will be higher in cost as well. These drives can still handle a fair amount of write cycles and I prefer these over TLC drives myself.

 

TLC is the cheapest and also has the lowest per cell write cycle rate with averages of 1,000 to 3,000 cycles per cell before failure. A lot of the newer TLC drives have been proven reliable even for a fair amount of writing to the drive...

 

The Samsung Evo 840 256gb ssd's have been put through a torture test and found to handle a fair amount of cycles, this is a TLC drive that is cheap and also happens to be one of the fastest SSD's available for the cost you can't go wrong with that drive. If you plan on doing more writing step up to the 840 Pro version which is MLC. You can find the torture test of the 840 EVO here: http://us.hardware.info/reviews/4178/hardwareinfo-tests-lifespan-of-samsung-ssd-840-250gb-tlc-ssd-updated-with-final-conclusion

 

Intel: any drives they have out seem to be reliable, I just recently picked up a 335 series 180gb MLC for around $99 on sale. I have an old 32gb intel x25-e SLC that is still going long beyond the stated write cycle max. I got the drive used for free from a data center, they got rid of it because it because it had SMART warnings, I was able to run MHDD on it and disable bad blocks. The drive worked fine after that and still works 3 years later it is in my media center pc and it caches streaming video quite often, no more failed blocks yet...

 

I shop around on 4 websites, amazon, newegg, tigerdirect, and microcenter (I live close to  microcenter and they often have in house sales not available online, I got my i7 4770k at microcenter in the store for $280 and they took an additional $40 off my motherboard, I had a big smile on my face that day!)...


Edited by zingo156, 11 June 2014 - 10:05 AM.

If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#6 badr0b0t

badr0b0t

  • Members
  • 328 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:03 PM

I will answer your question directly with a brand recommedation. Samsung Evo Series. It's not top of the line but I am sure that is all you need. 120GB or 240GB? It's up to your budget. Thing is, you only need the SSD for the OS. Keep your existing hard drive for data storage.

Choosing what SSD to get is an easy part. Anyone can give you a good recommendation. Migrating to it is a more challenging undertaking. Let us know when you are ready to migrate. But to make your life easy without having to pay for anything, use Macrium Reflect Free Edition. It's much easier to use that the migration software that comes with Samsung SSDs.

 

Cheers!


Edited by badr0b0t, 11 June 2014 - 12:05 PM.

sig07.gif?psid=1

                                                           (Click sig to enlarge.)                                                    

 


#7 MADDxDOGG

MADDxDOGG
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 29 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 11 June 2014 - 07:10 PM

Ok so i have found a SSD I dont know if im aloud to post links but here:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Samsung-840-EVO-SATAIII-TLC-Solid-State-Drive-SSD-120GB-MZ-7TE120BW-/400709959016?pt=US_Solid_State_Drives&hash=item5d4c2cbd68 ......

 

is that the type of drive that i need thats in my budget



#8 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 12 June 2014 - 07:43 AM

That is a very good drive for the cost. I highly recommend it. Don't forget to backup data though, I never trust any 1 point of storage, 2 is better than one, 3 better than 2 and so on.


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#9 badr0b0t

badr0b0t

  • Members
  • 328 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 12 June 2014 - 07:49 AM

Yeah. Good choice. And always make sure to create system image backups for easy and fast OS restoration when you run into serious problems.


sig07.gif?psid=1

                                                           (Click sig to enlarge.)                                                    

 


#10 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,278 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:24 AM

Depending on the software you use you may want to go bigger.  I ordered the 256GB drive I linked earlier last night.  Seems a lot of the software I run likes to toss two tons of stuff on the C: drive.  The offending programs, ACDSee, Amazon Cloud Player, Cyberlink PowerDVD, DVD Profiler, and iTunes.  All of those programs store cover art, thumbnails, and catalogs that can take up a lot of space, over 12GB in my situation.  Granted my digital entertainment library is much larger than the average user.



#11 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:28 AM

The 256gb version of the same samsung evo is going for around $134.99 on newegg, it is faster than the smaller 120gb on writes. If you can squeeze in the extra cost I second Kilroy's suggestion of going up to the bigger model.


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#12 MADDxDOGG

MADDxDOGG
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 29 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:11 AM

Posted 12 June 2014 - 12:03 PM

i mainly use my pc for gaming and i dont have anything to back up that cant be put on a pen drive



#13 Datcoolguy

Datcoolguy

  • Members
  • 303 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:11 AM

Posted 14 June 2014 - 12:48 PM

I have never even seen a SSD drive in person since they are expensive and our economy is really bleepty, but sandisk have been promoting a 10 year warranty trough a sponsor contract on a starcraft tourney hosted by John Bain (TotalBiscuit). Might wanna look into that, since SSD's where unreliable when it came to their life time. Also watch out, not so long ago some guys created an update to the SSD's that increased their speed by 300% and it's lifespan for 100% i think, or maybe it was the other way around, anyways, if you can get your hands in one with that newer firmware you'd be really lucky, and if you wanna read more about that firmware thingy just google "SSD breaktrough"


"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#14 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 54,820 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:11 AM

Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:06 PM

FWIW:  If there is anything that some of us have learned...it is that you don't want to ever be the beta tester when these "technology breakthroughts" occur :).

 

I remember when the first rewriteable CD-players and Iomega removeable storage came out...the cost, the frustrations that users/consumers experienced until "they got it right"...of course, by then the technology was obsolete and users had moved on to the newer technologies.

 

Ask those who purchased those OCZ SSDs which were recalled :).

 

Let somebody else demonstrate that things work reliably for a given period of time...before you believe in it.

 

Louis

 

I just read this article, SSD Breakthrough Means...


Edited by hamluis, 14 June 2014 - 01:10 PM.
Added edit.


#15 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,881 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:03:11 AM

Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:13 PM

The 256gb version of the same samsung evo is going for around $134.99 on newegg, it is faster than the smaller 120gb on writes. If you can squeeze in the extra cost I second Kilroy's suggestion of going up to the bigger model.

That's the one (250GB Samsung 840 EVO) I recently purchased from Newegg, upgraded to dual boot Windows 7 Pro & Dell OEM Windows 8 on the same PC.

 

The 120GB that was bought shortly after obtaining the computer is being used for Linux Mint 17. For the price, these are ultra fast SSD's. However, I've found the Samsung Rapid app to cause hanging issues when dual (or tri) booting across different OS's, this wasn't an issue when the 120GB with Windows 7 Pro was the only OS on the system. It began only after reattaching the 120GB one & installing Mint 17.

 

Plus the Rapid app will cause benchmarks to go through the roof when running Crystal Disk software. See the before & after disabling Rapid Mode snapshots. The after is closer to real world performance.

 

Attached File  Capture (CDB Windows 7 Pro).PNG   53.86KB   1 downloads  Attached File  Capture (Windows 7 Pro, no Rapid Mode).PNG   51.51KB   0 downloads

 

Refer to my sig for detailed Speccy specs.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 14 June 2014 - 01:52 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users