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Linux Looks Good But Is Not User Friendly


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#1 azrael

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 07:48 PM

I hate windows, but have to admit that my peripherals work.Linux looks great. I have loaded several distros but can never get support for my scanner,printer or modem.There is no way Linux can start to challege microsoft until it resolves the driver recognition problem and makes it easier to configure and get things up and running.I don't consider myself to be a complete novice,but even I find it hard.How is a total novice going to cope?

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#2 Elendil

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 09:50 AM

Well, Linux is a operating system that requires good-expert level computer knowledge. I myself (being the noob I am) find Linux unsafe and unusable with my current knowledge. As I understand it, excellent programming and security knowledge is required for Linux to run smoothly and securely. Since the secured Linux (you need to manually secure it with programming and security skills) is just as weak if not weaker than Windows, I'd advise you stick with Windows XP Professional or Home. In regards with your question, like I said I feel extremely uncomfortable with Linux in issues such as yours because I believe you need a strong archive of knowledge in programming to make it work.

Edited by Elendil, 27 May 2006 - 09:52 AM.

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#3 acklan

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 10:14 AM

Try one of the live versions of Linux. Puppy, DSL, Knoppix. They run from a CD or the hard drive and are fairly user friendly.
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#4 raw

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 05:24 PM

I believe you need a strong archive of knowledge in programming to make it work.

Although I am a Unix System Admin and have a fair bit of programming knowledge
I have found that PCLOS comes the closest to "just works" right from the beginning.
I have had my share of problems with other Linux distributions (RedHat and Suse).
But I have to disagree that you need to be an "expert" to learn to use Linux.
There are many excellent LiveCD versions that do not need to be installed to test and
see if your hardware is compatible.
Aside from the programs that i purposely run from the command line, I very rarely have
to open a terminal for configuration. (Nvidia driver is the only thing that comes to mind).
Everything else is point and click.

And I don't need to install an assortment of Anti-Spyware/Malware/Virus just to be safe
on the internet. Keep in mind that Microsoft has to pay it's employees so they
charge a great deal for their OS. Most Linux distros are free and developed by the
community (same as the free support we offer here). The problem lies in
the hardware vendor not providing Linux drivers or sharing code with developers
to write device drivers. There's no money in it for them since the Linux user base
is much smaller then Windows users. Getting over the initial hurdles and learning
curve can seem intimidating, but the satisfaction of having a secure stable OS is
well worth the time spent.

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#5 azrael

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 08:40 PM

Thank you for your replies.I would really like like to ditch ms and go with a Linux distro. I will continue to test until I find something suitable.In the meantime can anyone tell me, if it is possible to convert a USB modem to Ethernet.I have a binatone usb modem and Linux does not recognise it.I have installed an ethernet card and bought a router.However I need an adapter to convert the usb to rj45 I think.Thanks for all your help.

#6 raw

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 10:03 PM

Here is a list i found of Linux compatible USB modems:
http://free.hostdepartment.com/g/gromitkc/usblist.html
Read through some of the stuff there. I personally never had
to set up a modem in Linux (always been on HSI and networked).

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#7 acklan

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 11:26 PM

Thank you for your replies.I would really like like to ditch ms and go with a Linux distro. I will continue to test until I find something suitable.In the meantime can anyone tell me, if it is possible to convert a USB modem to Ethernet.I have a binatone usb modem and Linux does not recognise it.I have installed an ethernet card and bought a router.However I need an adapter to convert the usb to rj45 I think.Thanks for all your help.

Contact your ISP and see if they will supply you with a ethernet version of your modem. They way even send a combination modem\wireless router with a 4 port ethernet switch.
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#8 azrael

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 07:40 AM

Good news.Suse 9.3 recognised my scanner a Canoscan N650U and it's working ok.I bought a cheap ethernet card and a new modem. I am going to set that up now and let everyone know how I get on.Still no joy with the printer a Canon Pixma ip4200. I bought this because it was supposed to work with Linux.The drivers I downloaded from Canon don't work,anyway I shall keep trying as it is a learning curve and once I get through it, I will get some satisfaction, and maybe help others who want to migrate towards Linux.

#9 acidburned

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 01:09 AM

why not try simplyMepis it works out of the box and is very easy to setup and use.also if you install mepis,and have problems there forum is so awsome that thell help you get things running if not,then maybe you should try something else.mepis is very newbie friendly.get the 3.4.3 version as mepis is switching the base from debian sid to ubuntu,for package stability.

#10 azrael

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 07:36 AM

I will try and get hold of simply mepis.I have just received via post a copy of linspire 5.0 from http://www.uselinux.co.uk so I'll try that. The Suse 9.3 is the Pro version I got from amazon for 45. So I have all the manuals. I have got the internet working and downloaded all the updates,still no printer but I feel I am almost there.

#11 Joedude

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 08:43 AM

Beofre you sink a small fortune in releases and new equipment, why not check

Sourceforge

They have it all. from packages to tutorials. It's where the minds that build linux live. There isn't always a driver or package file out there for your particular products, however, this site could save you a lot of cash.

The best way to learn linux is to do it. Reading a lot helps.

I also have to disagree with the security. Linux by it's very nature, even at a base install, is far more secure than any windows machine, regardless of what protections and updates you've installed. The main reason, IMHO is there is no registry to be tampered with. There are viruses out there, and spyware, for linux. They are few and far between and require specific programs with a specific version to work. In addition, you would actually have to install the malware yourself. In the 6 years now that I have run Linux, I have never had any kind of virus or spyware in my linux side. I can't say the same for my XP side, as I just had a major fiasco. Thanx to this site, XP is now clean.

Edited by Joedude, 05 June 2006 - 08:47 AM.

If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#12 azrael

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 10:51 AM

I take back what I said earlier.Mepis is so easy. I got everything up and running in no time.I think I'll stick with this one.Cheers everyone!

#13 Jesse Bassett

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 11:07 AM

Yeah, Linux is user-friendly. The only distro I found that is not user friendly is Gentoo. All others are friendlier than M$ could ever be.
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#14 tom76

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 03:30 PM

Good news.Suse 9.3 recognised my scanner a Canoscan N650U and it's working ok.I bought a cheap ethernet card and a new modem. I am going to set that up now and let everyone know how I get on.Still no joy with the printer a Canon Pixma ip4200. I bought this because it was supposed to work with Linux.The drivers I downloaded from Canon don't work,anyway I shall keep trying as it is a learning curve and once I get through it, I will get some satisfaction, and maybe help others who want to migrate towards Linux.


If still current:

The documentation in the Canon-Download should explain everything for Suse? Anyway, this is how I installed it under Debian, maybe it works for you, too:

To install Canon IP4200 you need the Canon drivers:

http://software.canon-europe.com/sof...302.asp?model=

These are rpm files. If you're using Debian or similar you need the 'alien' program which you can download via the package manager ('Synaptic' in Debian).
Untar the tar-file.
You only need two of the created rpm-files, namely cnijfilter-common-2.60-1.i386.rpm and cnijfilter-ip4200-2.60-1.i386.rpm.
To convert these two files with 'alien', type the following command line in the console:

alien -c cnijfilter-common-2.60-1.i386.rpm cnijfilter-ip4200-2.60-1.i386.rpm

(The -c might be necessary to include scripts in the converting process.)

That should create two deb-files.
Install these two files by right-clicking them and choosing 'install' or something like that.
Type one more command in the console:

sudo /etc/init.d/cupsys restart

(This is necessary to restart the printer software again after the installation.)

Then configure the printer: go to 'utilities' or sth like that, and then 'printers'. Choose 'add' or similar.
Choose the printer model Canon IP4200.
Find the newly installed driver file canonip4200.ppd in the path: /usr/share/cups/model/canonip4200.ppd
Select it and finish the configuration. Set the printer as default. That should be all.
(For what ever reasons the test page didn't seem to work with me, but the normal printing does.)

Compare:

#15 tom76

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 03:32 PM

Compare: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HardwareS...anonPixmaIP4200




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