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What does the Microsoft Teredo Tunneling Adapter do, and is it useful?


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#1 signofzeta

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 01:05 AM

I have an error code 10 with my Microsoft Teredo Tunneling Adapter, so I don't know what to do with it.  Tried re-installing it, and nothing happened.

 

I want to know if the Microsoft Teredo Tunneling Adapter is useful, and what does it do?  Does it matter if I just completely uninstall it?

 

I heard it has something to do with IPv4 and IPv6, but I don't know the difference between the two.

 

I tried LAN quake, and it works, so I don't really know how important the Microsoft Teredo Tunneling Adapter is to my laptop.



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 02:16 AM

Teredo tunneling is a transition technology that gives full IPv6 connectivity for IPv6-capable hosts which are on the IPv4 Internet but which have no direct native connection to an IPv6 network. At the moment most home systems connected to the internet do not have native IPv6 connectivity and as more websites move to the new system teredo tunneling needs to be used so our IPv4 sytsems can have access and process IPv6 address data.
The limitations of IPv4 mean that over the next few years the world would run out of new internet addresses so hence the move to IPv6. Teredo tunneling is intended to be only a temporary measure: in the long term, all IPv6 hosts should use native IPv6 connectivity. ISP's have a lot of work to do still before this becomes reality though.

The reality is that at the moment you can get away without it. I have IPv6 disabled on my network to avoid confusion with legacy machine equipment, I've never missed it in the slightest... Not saying this won't change in the future though.



#3 stoneyc

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 02:56 PM

don't no what operating system your running but I updated to windows 8.1 then windows 8.1 update 1 then it took care of the code 10 error  don't get it no more so if your running windows 8 update it should go away



#4 The_Stryker

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 11:35 PM

Teredo tunneling is a transition technology that gives full IPv6 connectivity for IPv6-capable hosts which are on the IPv4 Internet but which have no direct native connection to an IPv6 network. At the moment most home systems connected to the internet do not have native IPv6 connectivity and as more websites move to the new system teredo tunneling needs to be used so our IPv4 sytsems can have access and process IPv6 address data.
The limitations of IPv4 mean that over the next few years the world would run out of new internet addresses so hence the move to IPv6. Teredo tunneling is intended to be only a temporary measure: in the long term, all IPv6 hosts should use native IPv6 connectivity. ISP's have a lot of work to do still before this becomes reality though.

The reality is that at the moment you can get away without it. I have IPv6 disabled on my network to avoid confusion with legacy machine equipment, I've never missed it in the slightest... Not saying this won't change in the future though.

Was looking into the nature of this tunneling adaptor initially, at it was showing as an "unsecured internet connection" error message on my Norton Antivirus Suite after the July 14th Win10 update was implemented on my machine- this is despite my Surface Book being plugged into the same, high-speed, secured LAN it always had been (using IPv4 at the moment exclusively).  

 

After reading your post, and knowing quite intimately the impetus behind IPv6, I just was wondering if you could address the following question:

 

I have a pretty new suite of devices connected to this wired/wireless, home/home office network (ISP- Verizon Fios: 100/100 Mbps connection on their newest, Gen 4 router), with the oldest device being an Amazon Fire TV streaming device... While I have not activated the IPv6 capability on my so-enabled router thus far because it doesn't seem necessary currently for (today's) internet browsing, I do plan on activating it going forward sooner than later, and therefore just wondered what type of legacy problems one could expect from activating this new protocol (as you had referenced above).  

 

Given that both of my PC's are Win10 machines with varying quality, Intel Core processor sets (4th gen i3 on Dell desktop and 6th gen. i7 on Surface Book), and the other devices on my network are all very current in terms of their core technology (possibly with the one exception with my mentioned, Amazon Fire TV streaming device), should I expect that enabling the IPv6 protocol on my router would create any issues for me?  

 

I wouldn't think my up-to-date computers, smartphones and tablets would have any issues with the v6 protocol given their specs and respective release dates, so would these legacy issues you spoke of be more focused on something like an older, wireless and cloud-print enabled printer perhaps?  Was just hoping you'd clarify if able, as with the need for IPv6 connectivity becoming imminent, I just would like to know if I should be expecting any issues with my current technology, or if it would likely be limited to a few, older peripherals.

 

It should be noted that my router will run in dual IPv4 & IPv6 mode with the IPv6 capability enabled, so this further confuses me in regards to your comment, as if an older device couldn't handle the new protocol, would it not simply revert to the working IPv4 designation, so that such things as cloud printing on my older, wireless printer would still not be interrupted due to the dual protocols running (this is how my router explains the dual mode setting when enabling the newer protocol)?  

 

Thanks in advance for any help provided, as like many people, I try to stay current with my technological products and their respective core settings, however not at the expense of their complete, continued functionality!



#5 TsVk!

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 11:54 PM

People are coming up with new solutions to issues all the time, endlessly ingenious creatures we are. I'd never heard of a dual IPV6/IPV4 router before your post here.

 

I've had connection stability, VNC issues, update server issues and more on IPV6 enabled machines... a dual protocol router would hopefully address that.

 

There's one sure fire way to find out of it's as good as it says it is though :thumbup2:



#6 TsVk!

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 11:57 PM

A NAT table from IPV6 to IPV4 would be something to look at... very curious. (nonsensical)

 

I think the local network would just continue to run on IPV4 where required and then swap to IPV6 where possible. Makes more sense.


Edited by TsVk!, 19 July 2016 - 12:00 AM.


#7 The_Stryker

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 12:25 AM

So just checked on it after reading your replies (thanks very much indeed!) because I caught a great wind of self-doubt upon the dubious feelings on a dual protocol router, and yes- IPv6 runs concurrently with IPv4 when enabled on this newest router offering from VZ Fios, as is currently reflected on the router Admin panel.  

 

That said, the reason I have not maybe hit any of the legacy issues you spoke of, is that despite having the v6 protocol enabled on both my Surface Book and my dual-mode router, the Surface's network LAN adapter properties show no IPv6 connectivity when checked- only IPv4.  Router is set to assign the new protocol's DNS and IP values automatically to enabled devices, and my Surface Book is similarly setup to do the same by taking it's cues from the router, however, it's reflecting no IPv6 connectivity (that might be your answer right there as to the boundless capabilities of my newer-tech devices LOL!).

 

I am able to discern a dedicated IPv6 gateway address thru the router (although the prefix value is empty), however I cannot seem to track down the all the required, correct values to setup a manual connection to the router on the v6 protocol.  Will reboot shortly to see if that remedies the issue of automatic connectivity settings, however as the router had already been enabled with IPv6/v4, as well as the Surface book for some time now, I doubt a reboot will provide a fix.

 

Any ideas on how to get the newer protocol connected without having access to the specific values needed for manual connection (so by creating the connection thru the WIn10 auto-detect feature for IPv6 connectivity instead of doing so manually)? 



#8 TsVk!

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 01:15 AM

It may just run IPV4 on your local network and then use it's own sort of translation for external networks... like I said it's completely new to me today and I haven't had a chance to read up on the technology, yet.

 

Did you read the manual by any chance?



#9 The_Stryker

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 01:27 AM

I hear you and appreciate your thoughts on the matter... 

 

i did read the basic, online help resource for the router actually, however it just said to let it auto configure the IPv6 connections with devices that supported the new protocol, so not much help unfortunately... I will be reading into it a bit deeper tomorrow evening, as it's way past bedtime at this point!

 

Once you've brushed up on the latest spec-books however, if you find a resolution, I'd love to hear it.  But you may be correct that it's simply a "ghosted" network running on the IPv4 internally, in which case I completely call BS on my ISP!

 

Regardless, thanks again for the helpful dialog.



#10 TsVk!

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 02:45 AM

Yeah, thanks for the interesting chat Stryker.



#11 BluesWolf

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 06:57 PM

Here's what worked for me.  It's in the windows knowledge base.  

 

In the start menu search bar type in REGEDIT to open the registry editor.  Navigate through the following:  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CURRENTCONTROLSET\SERVICES\TCPIP6\PARAMETERS.  In the right pane, right click Disabled Componets and select edit.  Set the DWord value to 0.  Restart your computer and the teredo tunneling adapter will now start.

 

 

Good luck to all.  Try this. Its easy and it works.






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