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Disrupted Connection/Outages?


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#1 Zagubadu

Zagubadu

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  • Local time:03:29 PM

Posted 07 June 2014 - 03:04 PM

Been having some issues lately, regular internet use like browsing or streaming is fine but anything heavier like gaming ( I play LoL ) has been crapping out on me. It feels like packet loss and I've figured out through tracert that its definitely something going haywire on my end. I'm just not too educated on all this network stuff, so I can't really make heads or tails of this netalyzr test I did. Maybe someone else could tell me what my issue is, hopefully. Thanks in advance.

 

 

Summary of Noteworthy Events

Address-based Tests
 
NAT detection (?): NAT Detected

Your global IP address is 74.75.189.164 while your local one is 192.168.1.6. You are behind a NAT. Your local address is in unroutable address space.

Your machine numbers TCP source ports sequentially. The following graph shows connection attempts on the X-axis and their corresponding source ports used by your computer on the Y-axis.

 

TCP ports are not renumbered by the network.

 
Local Network Interfaces (?): OK
Your computer reports the following network interfaces, with the following IP addresses for each one:
  • eth0: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth1: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth2: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth3: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth4: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth5: (an ethernet interface)
  • eth6: (an ethernet interface)
  • lo: (a local loopback interface)
    • 127.0.0.1 (an IPv4 loopback address)
    • ::1 (an IPv6 loopback address)
  • net0:
  • net1:
  • net10:
  • net11:
  • net2:
  • net3:
  • net4:
    • fe80::e0:0:0:0 (a link-local IPv6 address)
  • net5:
    • 192.168.1.6 [Zagubadu-PC] (a private IPv4 address)
    • fe80::b582:a5ee:72dc:4e99 [Zagubadu-PC] (a link-local IPv6 address)
  • net6:
  • net7:
  • net8:
  • net9:
  • ppp0:
  • ppp1:
 
DNS-based host information (?): OK
You are not a Tor exit node for HTTP traffic.
You are listed on the Spamhaus Policy Based Blacklist, meaning that your provider has designated your address block as one that should only be sending authenticated email, email through the ISP's mail server, or using webmail.
The SORBS DUHL believes you are using a dynamically assigned IP address.
 
NAT support for Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) (?): Yes
We received UPnP responses from one device:
  • 192.168.1.1: this device provided a valid device description via its UPnP URL. This description, viewable here, contains the following information about this gateway:
  • This device appears to run "WNR2000v3 UPnP/1.0 miniupnpd/1.0". This system may be vulnerable to CVE-2013-0230
Reachability Tests
 
TCP connectivity (?): OK
Direct TCP access to remote FTP servers (port 21) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SSH servers (port 22) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SMTP servers (port 25) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote DNS servers (port 53) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote HTTP servers (port 80) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote POP3 servers (port 110) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote RPC servers (port 135) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote NetBIOS servers (port 139) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote IMAP servers (port 143) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SNMP servers (port 161) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote HTTPS servers (port 443) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SMB servers (port 445) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SMTP/SSL servers (port 465) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote secure IMAP servers (port 585) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote authenticated SMTP servers (port 587) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote IMAP/SSL servers (port 993) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote POP/SSL servers (port 995) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote OpenVPN servers (port 1194) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote PPTP Control servers (port 1723) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote SIP servers (port 5060) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote BitTorrent servers (port 6881) is allowed.
Direct TCP access to remote TOR servers (port 9001) is allowed.
 
UDP connectivity (?): OK
Basic UDP access is available.

The client was able to send fragmented UDP traffic.

The client was able to receive fragmented UDP traffic.

Direct UDP access to remote DNS servers (port 53) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote NTP servers (port 123) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote NetBIOS NS servers (port 137) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote NetBIOS DGM servers (port 138) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote IKE key exchange servers (port 500) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote OpenVPN servers (port 1194) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote Slammer servers (port 1434) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote L2 tunneling servers (port 1701) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote IPSec NAT servers (port 4500) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote RTP servers (port 5004) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote RTCP servers (port 5005) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote SIP servers (port 5060) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote VoIP servers (port 7078) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote VoIP servers (port 7082) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote SCTP servers (port 9899) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote Steam gaming servers (port 27005) is allowed.
Direct UDP access to remote Steam gaming servers (port 27015) is allowed.
 
Traceroute (?): OK

It takes 22 network hops for traffic to pass from our server to your system, as shown below. For each hop, the time it takes to traverse it is shown in parentheses.

  1. 10.254.184.3 (0 ms)
  2. ip-10-1-12-1.ec2.internal (0 ms)
  3. ip-10-1-33-0.ec2.internal (0 ms)
  4. *
  5. *
  6. *
  7. *
  8. 100.64.16.197 (2 ms)
  9. 72.21.222.32 (1 ms)
  10. 72.21.220.172 (1 ms)
  11. 72.21.220.172 (1 ms)
  12. 54.240.229.218 (10 ms)
  13. 54.240.228.195 (9 ms)
  14. 54.240.228.197 (9 ms)
  15. 80.239.132.213 (9 ms)
  16. timewarner-ic-303549-nyk-b5.c.telia.net (18 ms)
  17. 107.14.19.146 (11 ms)
  18. ae-1-0.a0.buf00.tbone.rr.com (12 ms)
  19. be41.albynyyf00r.nyroc.rr.com (18 ms)
  20. ae13.ptldmehx-rtr001.ne.northeast.rr.com (76 ms)
  21. rdc-24-31-156-255.ne.east.twcable.com (29 ms)
  22. rdc-24-31-156-253.ne.east.twcable.com (30 ms)
 
Path MTU (?): OK
The path between your network and our system supports an MTU of at least 1500 bytes, and the path between our system and your network has an MTU of 1500 bytes.
 
Hidden Proxy Detection (?): OK
We detected no proxies using this test.
Network Access Link Properties+
 
Network performance (?): Latency: 42 ms, Loss: 0.0%
The round-trip time (RTT) between your computer and our server is 42 ms, which is good.
We recorded no packet loss between your system and our server.
 
TCP connection setup latency (?): 43ms
The time it takes your computer to set up a TCP connection with our server is 43 ms, which is good.
 
Background measurement of network health (?): 5 transient outages, longest: 1.0 seconds
During most of Netalyzr's execution, the client continuously measures the state of the network in the background, looking for short outages. During testing, the client observed 5 such outages. The longest outage lasted for 1.0 seconds. This suggests a general problem with the network where connectivity is intermittent. This loss might also cause some of Netalyzr's other tests to produce incorrect results.
 
Network bandwidth (?): Upload 2.1 Mbit/s, Download 19 Mbit/s
Your Uplink: We measured your uplink's sending bandwidth at 2.1 Mbit/s. This level of bandwidth works well for many users.
Your Downlink: We measured your downlink's receiving bandwidth at 19 Mbit/s. This level of bandwidth works well for many users. 
During this test, the client observed 24 reordered packets.
 
Network buffer measurements (?): Uplink 250 ms, Downlink 110 ms
We estimate your uplink as having 250 ms of buffering. This level may serve well for maximizing speed while minimizing the impact of large transfers on other traffic.
We estimate your downlink as having 110 ms of buffering. This level may serve well for maximizing speed while minimizing the impact of large transfers on other traffic.
HTTP Tests
 
Address-based HTTP proxy detection (?): OK
We detected no explicit sign of HTTP proxy via IP address changes.
 
Content-based HTTP proxy detection (?): OK
No HTTP header or content changes hint at the presence of a proxy.
 
HTTP proxy detection via malformed requests (?): OK
Deliberately malformed HTTP requests arrive at our server unchanged. We are not able to detect a proxy along the path to our server using this method.
 
Filetype-based filtering (?): OK
We did not detect file-content filtering.
 
HTTP caching behavior (?): OK
We detected no signs of a transparent HTTP cache in your network path.
 
JavaScript-based tests (?): OK
The client did not execute within a frame
Your web browser reports the following cookies for our web page:
  • netAlizEd = BaR (set by our server)
  • netalyzrStatus = running (set by our server)
Your web browser was unable to fetch an image using IPv6.
DNS Tests
 
Restricted domain DNS lookup (?): OK
We can successfully look up a name which resolves to the same IP address as our webserver. This means we are able to conduct many of the tests on your DNS server.
 
Unrestricted domain DNS lookup (?): OK
We can successfully look up arbitrary names from the client. This means we are able to conduct all test on your DNS server.
 
DNS resolver address (?): OK
The IP address of your ISP's DNS Resolver is 74.125.40.18, which does not resolve. Additional nameservers observed for your host: 74.125.40.16, 74.125.40.22, 74.125.40.20, 74.125.176.148, 74.125.176.151.
 
DNS resolver properties (?): Lookup latency 140 ms
Your ISP's DNS resolver requires 140 ms to conduct an external lookup. It takes 86 ms for your ISP's DNS resolver to lookup a name on our server.
Your resolver correctly uses TCP requests when necessary.
Your resolver is using QTYPE=A for default queries.
Your resolver is not automatically performing IPv6 queries.
Your DNS resolver requests DNSSEC records.
Your DNS resolver advertises the ability to accept DNS packets of up to 4096 bytes.
Your DNS resolver can successfully receive a smaller (~1400 byte) DNS response.
Your DNS resolver can successfully receive a large (>1500 byte) DNS response.
Your DNS resolver can successfully accept large responses.
Your resolver uses 0x20 randomization.
Your ISP's DNS server is capable of fetching records using IPv6.
No transport problems were discovered which could affect the deployment of DNSSEC.
 
Direct probing of DNS resolvers (?)
Your system is configured to use 1 DNS resolver(s).
The resolver at 192.168.1.1 can process all tested types. Requests from this resolver come from 74.125.40.22. This resolver requries 227 ms to fetch a result from our server and 70 ms to return a result from its cache. It validates DNSSEC. It does not provide requested DNSSEC records. It does not wildcard NXDOMAIN errors. The resolver reports a number of additional properties. Show them.
 
 
DNS glue policy (?): Warning
Your ISP's DNS resolver does not accept generic additional (glue) records — good.
Your ISP's DNS resolver does not accept additional (glue) records which correspond to nameservers.
Your ISP's DNS resolver follows CNAMEs regardless of their location. This is very unusual.
 
DNS resolver port randomization (?): OK
Your ISP's DNS resolver properly randomizes its local port number.

The following graph shows DNS requests on the x-axis and the detected source ports on the y-axis.

 

 
DNS lookups of popular domains (?): OK
100 of 100 popular names were resolved successfully. Show all names.
40 popular names have a mild anomaly. The ownership suggested by the reverse name lookup does not match our understanding of the original name. The most likely cause is the site's use of a Content Delivery Network. Show all names.
3 popular names have a mild anomaly: we are unable to find a reverse name associated with the IP address provided by your ISP's DNS server. This is most likely due to a slow responding DNS server or misconfiguration on the part of the domain owner. Show all names.
 
DNS external proxy (?): OK
Your host ignores external DNS requests.
 
DNS results wildcarding (?): OK
Your ISP correctly leaves non-resolving names untouched.
 
DNS-level redirection of specific sites (?): OK
Your ISP does not appear to be using DNS to redirect traffic for specific websites.
 
Direct probing of DNS roots (?): Note
We checked which DNS root server instances your computer can reach. 12 of 13 root servers responded. Show them.
IPv6 Tests
 
DNS support for IPv6 (?): OK
Your system does not look up IPv6 addresses by default. Your DNS resolver is not onGoogle's IPv6 "whitelist", which means that Google does not enable IPv6 access to their services for you.
 
IPv4, IPv6, and your web browser (?): No IPv6 support
Your browser was unable to fetch a test image from an IPv6-only server. IPv4 performance to our IPv4-only server did not differ substantially from our IPv4/IPv6 dual-stacked one.
 
IPv6 connectivity (?): No IPv6 support
Your system appears to have no IPv6 connectivity as it was unable to look up the IPv6 address associated with our IPv6 test server.
Network Security Protocols
 
DNSSEC Support from the DNS Roots (?): Warning
Only some DNS root server instances returned proper DNSSEC information. The working roots are: A, B, C, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M
Host Properties
 
System clock accuracy (?): Warning
Your computer's clock is 14 seconds slow.
 
Browser properties (?): OK
Your web browser sends the following parameters to all web sites you visit:
  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/35.0.1916.114 Safari/537.36
  • Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml; q=0.9,image/webp,*/*; q=0.8
  • Accept Language: en-US,en;q=0.8
  • Accept Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch
  • Accept Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Java identifies your operating system as Windows 7.
 
Uploaded data (?): OK
The client uploaded the following additional content:

 



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