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HP Compaq N9010 boot problem


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#1 gramacar

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 09:42 AM

Hello all. This is my 1st post and I am glad I found you. I have a HP Compaq NX9010 laptop that recently came up with a problem.

It keeps booting into bios. I tried to reset the bios to default settings and then saved the changes but nothing. In the next boot

it goes to bios without pressing any keys. I also changed the boot sequence puting the cd rom as first boot device and put a  boot cd inside

but still nothing. I also checked the f2 key in case it was stacked but no it is ok. Do you have any ideas? I would appreciate any suggestion.

Sorry for my poor english and thanks again.

john

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:16 AM

Try the following. It would be even better if you could also remove the CMOS battery.

 

Detach any power adapter. Remove the main battery. Hold down the power button for 30 seconds. If the CMOS battery was removed, replace it. Attach the power adapter but leave the main battery out. Power on the computer. May be a good time to replace the CMOS battery if it has not been replaced in awhile.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:18 PM

I've had this same issue with older Dell notebooks & one PC. Installing a new CMOS battery fixed the issue.

 

Once these eventually dies, the settings won't be retained, including the hardware clock. Here is the removal procedure, on page 91 (2-61), PDF Reader required.

 

http://h20565.www2.hp.com/portal/site/hpsc/template.BINARYPORTLET/public/kb/docDisplay/resource.process/?spf_p.tpst=kbDocDisplay_ws_BI&spf_p.rid_kbDocDisplay=docDisplayResURL&javax.portlet.begCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken&spf_p.rst_kbDocDisplay=wsrp-resourceState%3DdocId%253Demr_na-c00246219-3%257CdocLocale%253Den_US&javax.portlet.endCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken

 

From what I can find, it seems to be the common CR2032 battery, available at may retailers, such as WalMart (best pricing) or pharmacies where batteries are stocked. These are also likely available at Radio Shack, but may cost more. WalMart has them in packs of 2 for less than $5. It may be best to remove & verify before purchase.

 

The real work here is getting to the battery, the few sources I've found indicates that a teardown is needed. If so & you wish to proceed, it would be best to take this time to clean up the internal of the notebook really good. This includes the cleaning of the heatsink & CPU surface & re-applying a thin amount of quality thermal paste.

 

Normally I wouldn't suggest this over a CMOS battery replacement, but since it's going to be apart anyway, may as well do so. It will run much cooler upon doing so, prolonging the life of it by possibly several years. Dust causes heat buildup & retention, acting as an insulator & is the eventual destroyer of many electronic devices, including computers, notebooks more so than tower PC's, due to the cramped space.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 07 June 2014 - 01:19 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 gramacar

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 01:29 PM

thank you very much for your suggestions. I can see that the most probable cause is the CMOS batery. I was afraid of that because the cure means that I have to strip the

laptop to get to the battery. Is there any way that I can be absolutely sure that this is it and not something else?

I forgot to mention that in one ocasion I managed to get into windows XP by pressing escape before it boots into bios. But that happened only once. So can I assume that the

hard drive is ok?



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 01:38 PM

Does the BIOS detect a hard drive present?

 

Because of your BIOS issue and not being able to boot to a CD, you could check the hard drive by removing the hard drive and attach it to another computer, either as another internal drive, using a USB enclosure, or using a USB adapter. I looked at the manual for a NX9020 which I believe is similar. It does require almost a full teardown.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 10:34 PM

I have a strong hunch that if the CMOS battery has never been replaced, it's due, as it's at least 10 years old. Eventually, they all fizzle out. If by chance a computer is left without power for an extended period, it'll happen sooner.

 

One way to tell for sure, would be to boot from any Linux media, if possible & not be connected to the Internet. The date/time shown will be that of what's originally stored in the BIOS hardware chip, if dead. That coin cell battery is what's needed to store the hardware clock & BIOS settings. Otherwise, all reverts back to Day 1, whatever date that may be.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 gramacar

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 11:57 PM

Does the BIOS detect a hard drive present?

 

 

 

Yes it does. It also holds any changes I made, for example I changed the boot sequence puting the cdrom as first boot device.

I am thinking to remove the laptop' s battery and connect only the charger in order to see if the cmos data like date and time will be

saved or revert to original values. I think this would be a good indication if the cmos battery is ok or dead.

Generally I cannot understand why a broken cmos battery would have an effect like this to the boot. I have seen many times a dead cmos battery in a desktop

and it operates normaly after you enter  the bios and make the proper setup. Then you can boot into windows. It does not cycle back to the bios.


Edited by gramacar, 08 June 2014 - 11:59 PM.


#8 gramacar

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 12:02 AM

I have a strong hunch that if the CMOS battery has never been replaced, it's due, as it's at least 10 years old. Eventually, they all fizzle out. If by chance a computer is left without power for an extended period, it'll happen sooner.

 

One way to tell for sure, would be to boot from any Linux media, if possible & not be connected to the Internet. The date/time shown will be that of what's originally stored in the BIOS hardware chip, if dead. That coin cell battery is what's needed to store the hardware clock & BIOS settings. Otherwise, all reverts back to Day 1, whatever date that may be.

 

Cat

 

 

Well yes, I have purchased this laptop back in 2004.

I tried to boot from a linux cd but it does not. It cycles back to bios everytime.


Edited by gramacar, 09 June 2014 - 03:27 AM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 11:01 AM

 

Does the BIOS detect a hard drive present?

 

 

 

Yes it does. It also holds any changes I made, for example I changed the boot sequence puting the cdrom as first boot device.

I am thinking to remove the laptop' s battery and connect only the charger in order to see if the cmos data like date and time will be

saved or revert to original values. I think this would be a good indication if the cmos battery is ok or dead.

Generally I cannot understand why a broken cmos battery would have an effect like this to the boot. I have seen many times a dead cmos battery in a desktop

and it operates normaly after you enter  the bios and make the proper setup. Then you can boot into windows. It does not cycle back to the bios.

 

Desktops will cycle back (lose settings) if the power is removed or interrupted in the case of a dead CMOS battery.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 gramacar

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 11:59 PM

 

 

Does the BIOS detect a hard drive present?

 

 

 

Yes it does. It also holds any changes I made, for example I changed the boot sequence puting the cdrom as first boot device.

I am thinking to remove the laptop' s battery and connect only the charger in order to see if the cmos data like date and time will be

saved or revert to original values. I think this would be a good indication if the cmos battery is ok or dead.

Generally I cannot understand why a broken cmos battery would have an effect like this to the boot. I have seen many times a dead cmos battery in a desktop

and it operates normaly after you enter  the bios and make the proper setup. Then you can boot into windows. It does not cycle back to the bios.

 

Desktops will cycle back (lose settings) if the power is removed or interrupted in the case of a dead CMOS battery.

 

Cat

 

 

I agree, This happens when power is off. But in the case of the laptop where there is a battery why ?

It also cycles back to bios after save settings and restart. It shouldn' t happen.



#11 cat1092

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 02:23 PM

My guess is that it has to do with the way notebooks are designed.

 

There could also be variations between brands as well. While yours doesn't hold settings, even if the battery is in place & plugged in constantly to AC power, others may or may not act the same.

 

Whenever any of my computers has these issues, I just fix it & go on. Though I do have to admit, tearing down notebooks can be very tedious & is by far, not my favorite thing to do. My personal advice, if you have a digital camera, take snapshots as you go. Lay everything out in an order that you can remember when reassembling. Everyone is different when it comes to this. If you have pets or children, do this work where nothing will be messed with.

 

Have some type of magnifying glass to see tiny components (those many screws) with.

 

And have patience. You'll need it. When you need to, walk away for a bit & go back. My first notebook teardown & reassemble took 3 days. Part of that was due to being unprepared.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 Willy22

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 05:41 PM

Service Manual:

http://h20628.www2.hp.com/km-ext/kmcsdirect/emr_na-c01122313-1.pdf

It's perhaps a good idea to update youor BIOS as well, after replacing the CMOS battery (Google it).






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