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#1 samuel3

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:42 PM

HI I have 3 questions

 

What are peoples best Antivirus? What gives the best free protection? Im looking to get one

 

Also How would I go about backing up my whole system / files on Windows 7?

 

How would I also unistalled Internet Explorer?


Edited by samuel3, 06 June 2014 - 05:46 PM.


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#2 Animal

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:12 PM

For question #1 see this topic: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/407147/answers-to-common-security-questions-best-practices/?p=2316629

Question #2 I'll let others weigh in.

Question #3 I would not try to uninstall it. It's going to cause you more trouble by breaking links within the operating system itself.

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#3 bassfisher6522

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:12 PM

AV advice is subjective at best....more of a personal choice really. That being said....just try all the free ones for 2 weeks eack and then decide whcih one you prefer. I personal recommend Avast and MSE for windows 7 and below and if using windows 8, use it's built in Defender, which is a revamped version of MSE.

 

The same is said for system imaging software....again a personal choice and what best fits your needs and feel. I'm all about using free software....currently I'm using Aomei Backupper but I have use Macrium and Acronis. You'll just need to try them and find which one you like.



#4 Wolverine 7

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:14 PM

Hi.for Antivirus have a look at

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/533109/free-anti-virus-software/

 

Just make sure to run one AV only on your system and use a program like Malwarebytes (also free) to scan for spyware etc every now and again.

 

For backups see

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/536797/to-understand-the-principles-of-data-backup/

 

You cant uninstall Internet Explorer it part of the Windows system,if you dont like it use another browser such as

Firefox or Chrome,IE can just be let alone,although it should still be updated with your other updates as it affects the

system and update process.Personally i dont use IE at all,as Firefox is more configurable and suits me.



#5 wpgwpg

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:44 PM

HI I have 3 questions

 

What are peoples best Antivirus? What gives the best free protection? Im looking to get one

 

Also How would I go about backing up my whole system / files on Windows 7?

 

How would I also unistalled Internet Explorer?

1) Very subjective question.  It's like what's the best car.  The current issue of Consumer Guide has some ratings FYI.

 

2) I use Easeus Todo Backup Free.  It''s free for home use, and it works great for me.  Again that's a subjective judgement though.   CNET has a lot of backup program reviews at 

Some of these are free (last time I checked there were over 300), some have free trials (over 1000), and some are purchase only (over 200).
 
3) If you must uninstall Internet Explorer, you'd do that in the Programs and Features applet of the Control Panel.  However you NEED IE for Windows updates, you don't have to use it for much else, you can use Firefox and Chrome without uninstalling IE, and personally I'd recommend against uninstalling it.
 
Good luck.

Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#6 Datcoolguy

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 11:03 PM

Also watch out when uninstalling IE since a lot of applications depend on it to work properly.


"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#7 cat1092

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 11:58 PM

#1) Look here, this gives a glance of the best overall security choices available. Then as bassfisher stated, download some trials.

 

http://www.av-comparatives.org/dynamic-tests/

 

#2) I use EaseUS Todo Workstation mainly, but also have used Macrium Reflect Free with success. Macrium Reflect (Free) has one option that some others doesn't, cloning over a large HDD to a smaller SSD (more common) or HDD & will be bootable afterwards.

 

#3) You should Never attempt to uninstall IE, it's a component of Windows, not optional software. Apps such as Windows Mail may not work with IE removed or disabled. The only reversible way to deal with IE & I still don't recommend it, is to disable. Go the Start, or Control Panel, type in the search box "Turn Windows Features on or off". Deselect IE (you will be warned), apply changes & reboot if prompted.

 

Take it from there.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 07 June 2014 - 12:01 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 badr0b0t

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 12:08 AM

1.) I've only used Avast Free for over almost a decade now. Never had single problem. But of course, knowing what you are doing online is the BEST anti-virus. You know what I mean.

 

2.) & 3) Like what cat1092 said above.

 

Cheers!


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#9 samuel3

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:38 AM

Dont I need a disk to backup files? Incase my computer dies?



#10 badr0b0t

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 07:39 AM

Backup is not an option. It is a must. And backups should be placed anywhere outside the system hard drive.

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#11 Scoop8

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:00 AM

samuel3

 

You've received a lot of good advice here.  I'll offer my 2¢:

 

- AV's:  As mentioned, it's a very subjective topic.  Here's an example.  I switched to Norton AV about 1.5 years ago.  So far, it's been my best experience after my previous 2 AV's for my home PC's. 

 

Other PC users will provide a 180° point of view about Norton.  Their experiences are as valid for their specific results are are mine with the same AV.

 

My previous AV product was ESET.  I wasn't satisfied with its track record on my PC.  At the same time, it's recommended by several members at this site for good reasons.  Their experiences with it are good.

 

I'm also running MBAM (Malwarebytes) Pro on my 2 PC's in addition to a family member's PC.  MBAM (pro version) is designed to run simultaneously with the AV product.  It is not a second AV tool.  I've been running it alongside Norton with no conflicts.  It's providing a dual-layer defense strategy as MBAM's engine does not scan using the same methods as the mainline AV product scanners.  However, this topic is a hot-button topic on the 'net so it's another one of those things where the PC user's decision is what matters for their individual choice.

 

 

- Backups:

 

More good advice provided to you from the other members.

 

I'm using Acronis (2011) paid version for my primary cloning tool and Macrium Reflect (free ver) for my Imaging tool.  I've tested both with each backup process (Cloning & Imaging) but I prefer to use them as mentioned since Acronis clones faster on my PC vs Macrium.   It takes about 10 minutes to clone my C HDD with Acronis vs about 25 minutes with Macrium.  I'm not sure as to the reason but it's not an issue with me using either tool for cloning.

 

If you're running a Desktop PC and have expansion room in your tower for additional 5.25-inch bays, I'd recommend this handy accessory (Amazon U.S. site link):

 

Kingwin KF-1000 Sata Hot-Swap Trays

 

I've had 2 of these installed in my Desktop PC for about 3 years.  They're really nice and a convenient way to run backup tools or to provide a fast removal and installation of your HDD's for additional storage capacity.

 

Cloning and Imaging:

 

Both, imo, are great ways that provide a complete hard drive backup method that will allow you to recover fast from HDD failures, virtually all malicious incidences, and user errors (bad downloads, Registry edit mistakes, etc).

 

I clone my Desktop PC once every 2 weeks and my Laptop about once every 6 weeks.  I also Image (full-HDD) occasionally for redundancy.  I store my images on an external HDD that's connected only during image processing.  The reason for that is to isolate the storage HDD from my PC, in the event of any "encryption" malware incidences or other infectious objects that may penetrate my AV defenses.

 

I prefer both methods (cloning & imaging) since cloning provides me a faster plug-and-play recovery method from any HDD issues as well as providing a spare ready-to-use HDD on the shelf.

 

Imaging provides flexibility for redundant full-HDD backups as well as the ability to store multiple images on a single storage HDD.  I have a couple of my Laptop images, a family member's image, and a few of my Desktop PC images all stored on my storage HDD.

 

My advice regarding the overall backup topic is:

 

- Verify the methodology.  Insure that any "Rescue" media (CD/DVD's in my case, also can be bootable USB sticks) will boot with your PC.  For this reason, I always clone and image by booting up on the tool's Rescue/Recovery media so that I know if a worse-case situation occurs ("C" HDD replaced, no OS to boot from), my full-HDD recovery method works.

 

For many backup tools, running the process from bootable media isn't necessary but I like to verify the "recovery" process.

 

- Maintain a backup plan for full-HDD and some kind of incremental method.  That way, if you need to recover your HDD, you'll have copies of your "must-have" items, those things that are frequently edited or changed, such as a client e-mail tool data file ("Outlook", etc).

 

I'm using Acronis to run a twice-daily unattended specific-item backup which backs up several of those "can't lose" items on my PC.  Since that requires a continuously-attached device (USB HDD), they are vulnerable to some types of malware ("Cryptolocker", etc).

 

Due to that possibility, I also copy those same specific items to another external USB HDD that's connected only during my "copy" process which takes about 10-15 seconds to copy since I use a "file copy" script to eliminate the "drag/drop" or copy/paste manual methods.

 

If my C HDD fails, or if I get hit with malware, I'll install my cloned HDD and be booted up and running as normal in minutes.  After that, I'll copy my specific items back to the replacement HDD.

 

Then, the only thing remaining is to sanitize my original infected HDD and clone back to it from the working spare HDD, and then verify the new spare HDD by booting up on it and running it to insure that all's well.

 

I've used this recovery method a couple of times over the years.

 

 

- IE Uninstall:  I only use IE myself but the other members have provided excellent advice on that topic.

 

 

Backup is not an option. It is a must. And backups should be placed anywhere outside the system hard drive.

 

Can't say it better than this :).  If most home PC users did this, the number of posts at BC and elsewhere that seek out malware-recovery assistance would drop significantly.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 11:30 AM

Dont I need a disk to backup files? Incase my computer dies?

Of course you do!

 

There are many sites, such as Newegg, that are always carrying external backup drives at promo pricing. That site may not be an option to you, however there's others, just depends on where one lives. Amazon ships to places where others doesn't.

 

Find a online (or local) tech retailer in your region & sign up for online promos. That way you'll be offered discount promo codes on all sorts of computer hardware & software.

 

I prefer to purchase what's known as "bare" or OEM HDD's, these ships without the retail box, screws or instructions. In my PC, I have such an extra HDD installed. I also have a USB 3.0 docking station & can place drives in this & perform backups. I no longer purchase pre-assembled backup drives for self use, instead reuse any that's removed from computers as these are upgraded to SSD's for backup ones. The only times that I do purchase one, is for someone else.

 

Not only do I backup to my internal backup/data drive, but also to one outside of the computer(s). Because if something really bad were to happen, such as a power supply failure, the whole computer could be torched. Reinstalling an OS is easy for me & replaceable, but by data is backupped to more than one drive for extra protection, to prevent losing years of work. As with many others, I learned this the hard way, several years back.

 

The facts are, hardware can fail at any given moment w/out any notice. If lucky & one stays on top of things, reading SMART data will determine drive health. However that cannot be depended on, it's like when running critically low on oil in some (older) cars & the Oil light would come on. Oftentimes, that would be too late & clicking sounds would happen, causing severe damage. Today's vehicles are designed to shutdown in this instance for protection. Still, checking one's oil regularly is the best preventative thing to do to avoid this from happening.

 

So consider backup as part of an overall maintenance plan for your computer. At a minimum, monthly. Mine are created 2x weekly on my main computer. If monthly, pick a date, on the computers that I perform monthly backups of, this is done prior to the monthly update cycle (Update Tuesday, the 2nd one of the month).

 

It's my hope that this & what the other members has contributed helps to explain this critical task (& your other inquires) to you. Should you require further assistance, feel free to ask at any time.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 Agouti

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 11:31 AM

Dont I need a disk to backup files? Incase my computer dies?

Obviously.



#14 badr0b0t

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 12:15 PM

Oh yes.... backups are more important than the original files themselves.. :)

 

 

 

 

 

...


Edited by badr0b0t, 07 June 2014 - 12:17 PM.

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#15 Wolverine 7

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 04:14 PM

Easy option for your backups is buy a large external drive,say 100 to 300 gb (works just like a large flash drive),just plug it in

and let it open,then back up your data to it.Sometimes you can get them as bargains if you look around,i just got 2 100gb and a

300gb externals from a closing down computer shop for next to nothing,or you can find them or very large flash drives online if you look around

 

For important data its helpfull to back up in two or even three locations..






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