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Possible to swap hard drives between computers?


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#1 Codered

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 04:44 PM

Hi,

 

I am trying to access a hard drive that was on a relatives computer. I have removed it from their computer, because there seems to be either a virus or power supply issue which does not allow the computer to power up.

 

On my computer, I have a removable hard drive port. I have tried to set that as the primary boot when I have the HDD connected, but I am having problems.

 

No matter how I try to boot with that drive, either safe mode (with or without networking, or with cmd prompt), last working config, or start normally, I get a blue screen for half a second that has the generic message saying that a problem has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.. so on and so forth.

 

Would there be a problem with moving a hard drive with windows vista, onto a computer that has a different OS such as windows 7 installed?



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#2 bassfisher6522

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 04:58 PM

When connecting a 2nd HDD to a system that was in some other system, never set it up to be the primary. Power down PC and connect HDD directly to the mobo or via your HDD port. Then power up PC and look under "my computer" depending on what OS your have. Then you should be able to see it and access it and if you can, then you know the HDD is good and the problem is with something else on the other PC...eg PSU, MOBO or CPU.

 

While the HDD  it's in your system you can use your scanning software to scan that drive for Virus's and malware/spyware.....making sure it clean and bug free.



#3 tomthegeek

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:06 PM

When connecting a 2nd HDD to a system that was in some other system, never set it up to be the primary. Power down PC and connect HDD directly to the mobo or via your HDD port. Then power up PC and look under "my computer" depending on what OS your have. Then you should be able to see it and access it and if you can, then you know the HDD is good and the problem is with something else on the other PC...eg PSU, MOBO or CPU.

 

While the HDD  it's in your system you can use your scanning software to scan that drive for Virus's and malware/spyware.....making sure it clean and bug free.

 

I agree. The hard drive from the other computer will contian the operating system set up to the hardware specifications of the first computer. You want to treat it as the "slaved drive". You just can't pop in a hard drive from another computer and boot from it.



#4 Codered

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:55 PM

Thank you. I am able to view the contents on the hard drive through "my computer".

 

I guess that leads me to my next question. how do I uninstall programs from the hard drive?

 

for example, there was an AIM program file on the hard drive. This program isnt used anymore, so i navigated to the uninstall executable inside of the AIM folder. After uninstalling it, the message said that the program was removed from the computer. However, the AIM folders still were on the hard drive.



#5 bassfisher6522

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:20 PM

The process for unistalling software on the secondary HDD is the same as if it was the primary HDD. Once you uninstall a program, there are always remnients of it still hanging around....eg registry entries, files and folders. You will just have to delete them manually.



#6 wpgwpg

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:41 PM

 As has been pointed out, you can't take a hard drive from one computer and boot it on another.  That means that while you're able to LOOK at what's on it, you can't run the programs that were installed on it, and you can't use the Control Panel's Programs and Features or anything like that to remove what's installed on it.  You have to just start up My Computer (aka Windows Explorer) and delete the folders that contain those programs.  Essentially just about anything in the Windows or Program Files folders on that drive is useless, so you can just delete those two and get rid of most all programs (including Windows) that are installed on it.

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#7 Frozwire

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:25 PM

Thank you. I am able to view the contents on the hard drive through "my computer".

 

I guess that leads me to my next question. how do I uninstall programs from the hard drive?

 

for example, there was an AIM program file on the hard drive. This program isnt used anymore, so i navigated to the uninstall executable inside of the AIM folder. After uninstalling it, the message said that the program was removed from the computer. However, the AIM folders still were on the hard drive.

 

You have to uninstall those programs and applications in the computer where the drive was used to be a system drive not on your computer. As you might cause a corrupt registry of the OS installed on that drive if you manually delete those files.


"Encryption...is a powerful defensive weapon for free people. It offers a technical guarantee of privacy, regardless of who is running the government... It's hard to think of a more powerful, less dangerous tool for liberty...” - Esther Dyson





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