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ADW cleaner


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#1 AliceZ

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 10:58 PM

does ADWcleaner have quarantine or vault? Or must everything be deleted without quarantine?



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 12:02 AM

Please refer to this thread.

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/506366/does-adwcleaner-automatically-quarantine/



#3 quietman7

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:06 PM

Generally speaking....when an anti-virus or security program quarantines a file (item) and moves it into a virus vault (virus chest) or a dedicated Quarantine folder, that file is safely held there and no longer a threat. The file is essentially disabled and prevented from causing any harm to your system through proprietary security routines which may copy, rename (usually by adding a .vir extension), encrypt and password protect the file as part of the process.

Quarantine is just an added safety measure which allows you to view and investigate the files while keeping them from harming your computer. One reason for doing this is to prevent the permanent deletion of a legitimate file that may have been incorrectly flagged (a "false positive") and placed in quarantine. This can occur if the scanner uses heuristic analysis technology which is not as reliable as signature-based detection (blacklisting) and can potentially increase the chances that a non-malicious program is flagged as suspicious or infected. If the file is confirmed as legitimate, it can be safely restored from quarantine and added to the exclusion or ignore list.

When the quarantined file is known to be malicious, you can permanently delete it.
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#4 AliceZ

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 05:15 PM

Generally speaking....when an anti-virus or security program quarantines a file (item) and moves it into a virus vault (virus chest) or a dedicated Quarantine folder, that file is safely held there and no longer a threat. The file is essentially disabled and prevented from causing any harm to your system through proprietary security routines which may copy, rename (usually by adding a .vir extension), encrypt and password protect the file as part of the process.

Quarantine is just an added safety measure which allows you to view and investigate the files while keeping them from harming your computer. One reason for doing this is to prevent the permanent deletion of a legitimate file that may have been incorrectly flagged (a "false positive") and placed in quarantine. This can occur if the scanner uses heuristic analysis technology which is not as reliable as signature-based detection (blacklisting) and can potentially increase the chances that a non-malicious program is flagged as suspicious or infected. If the file is confirmed as legitimate, it can be safely restored from quarantine and added to the exclusion or ignore list.

When the quarantined file is known to be malicious, you can permanently delete it.

 

Thank you.

 

#1- How do the files get into the Quarantine folder?

Are they put there as soon as I click on the CLEAN? (#1A- Nothing is really deleted, but always sent to the Quarantine folder. Correct?)

 

Also

 

"If the file is confirmed as legitimate, it can be safely restored from quarantine and added to the exclusion or ignore list."

#2- How would I know if it is legitimate?

"When the quarantined file is known to be malicious, you can permanently delete it."

#3- How would I know if it is malicious and should be deleted?

 

Please remember I am completely new at this and computer ignorant (at my advanced age, but trying to learn).



#5 quietman7

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:02 PM

#1- How do the files get into the Quarantine folder?

When a security scanner detects a file as malicious, the security program itself moves the file.
 

#2- How would I know if it is legitimate?

1. You can Google search the file by name. However, keep in mind that when doing so,, it is not unusual to find numerous hits from untrustworthy and scam sites which mis-classify detections or provide misleading information. This is deliberately done more as a scam to entice folks into buying an advertised fix or removal tool. In some cases if the fix is a free download, users may be enticed to download a malicious file or be redirected to a malicious web site. In other cases you are referred to contact the site's Tech Support for assistance which is only provided for a fee. Therefore, when searching for information, use multiple and trustworthy sources.

2. You can also get a second opinion. Go to one of the following online services that analyzes suspicious files:--In the "File to Scan" (Upload or Submit) box, browse to the location of the file(s) in question and submit (upload) it for scanning/analysis. If you get a message saying "File has already been analyzed", click Reanalyze or Scan again.

3. Ask for assistance at a community forum like this one.
 

#3- How would I know if it is malicious and should be deleted?

If you find trustworthy information which confirms the file is bad.
If an online analyzes with several anti-virus scanning engines confirm the file is bad.
A trusted member of the a community forum like this one confirms the file is bad.

With AdwCleaner, the contents of the log file may be confusing. Unless you see a program name that you recognize and know should not be removed, I would not worry about it. AdwCleaner will search for and remove many potentially unwanted programs (PUPs), adware, toolbars, browser hijackers, extensions, add-ons, browser helper objects (BHOs) and other junkware to include related registry entries (values, keys).

Anti-virus programs general scan for infectious malware which includes viruses, Trojans, worms, rootkits and bots. PUPs, adware, toolbars, browser hijackers, extensions, add-ons, browser helper objects and junkware do not fall into any of those categories. So even if you remove a legitimate file for a program you use, you can always reinstall that program.

BTW...I'm advanced in age myself.
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#6 AliceZ

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 10:40 AM

Re: Your "

#1- How do the files get into the Quarantine folder?

"When a security scanner detects a file as malicious, the security program itself moves the file."

 

 

In ADW wouldn't I have to click on "clean" in order for the 'found' items  to be put in the quarantic/vault folder? If I just did an "X" (close program), the files would not be put in the quarantine/valut folder - correct?



#7 quietman7

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:02 PM

After running a scan, all detected items will be listed in each tab and checked for deletion by DEFAULT. You can click on any of the items listed in the tabs and uncheck those you want to keep before cleaning.

When ready to remove, click on the Clean button...press OK when asked to close all programs and follow the onscreen prompts. Then allow AdwCleaner to restart the computer and complete the removal process.
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#8 AliceZ

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 02:30 PM

#1- But if I don't click on CLEAN and just (X) close the program, none of the found exceptions will be put into the Quarantine/Vault - is that correct?

 

#2- They only go into the Quarantine/Vault when I click on CLEAN - is that correct?

 

#3- An item is not really deleted when I click CLEAN, but it is put in Quarantine/Valut to be removed or restored later - is that correct?

 

Thank you for your time in answering my many questions

 

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#9 quietman7

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 03:15 PM

Correct. If you close the program without clicking on Clean...nothing happens. AdwCleaner will most likely find the same items next time it is run. If you click on Clean, the file detections are moved to quarantine. After clicking the Clean button and then confirming a file is legitimate, it can be safely restored from quarantine and added to the exclusion or ignore list. Thus, it's not technically deleted until you remove everything from quarantine.
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#10 AliceZ

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:33 PM

That's what I wanted to know. Thank you again for your help. Much appreciated.

 

(I am just a bit frightened about any AV/Malware program removing files from the Registry, especailly in Win7, and it is good to know that items Checked and Cleaned go to the Quarantine folder rather than being deleted. And that they can be restored if necessary.)



#11 quietman7

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:02 PM

You're welcome.

BTW, Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does.

Resources to help you understand:If you are concerned about the registry...the best practice is to back it up first (create a system restore point) before running security tools which may make changes to it as part of the clean up routine.
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#12 AliceZ

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:12 PM

Thank you so much. I will keep a reminder to Backup (create a "System Restore point")  on my desk. Good thing to remember before making 'any' changes on the computer.

Have a good weekend.

 

I believe "Backup" and "Create System Restore Point" are one in the same, and the Create System Restore Point will also back-up the Registry. Is that true? Will Creating a System Restore Point  also backup (save) the Registry?


Edited by AliceZ, 06 June 2014 - 09:47 PM.


#13 quietman7

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:02 PM

:thumbup2:
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#14 AliceZ

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:49 PM

I saw your previous post but d8dh't see ahy message and wondered if you wanted to tell me something?

 

Would you be able to answer the following?

 

I believe "Backup" and "Create System Restore Point" are one in the same, and the Create System Restore Point will also back-up the Registry. Is that true? Will Creating a System Restore Point  also backup (save) the Registry?


Edited by AliceZ, 06 June 2014 - 09:52 PM.


#15 quietman7

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:33 AM

They are different ways to back up and both methods are fully explained in the links I provided above and reposted below.
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