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PC won't turn on


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#1 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 11:26 AM

Hi guys.

I've had my computer (AMD Advent Centurion cbe1401) for about 4-5 years without much of a problem up until september last year.

Their was no indication that a problem existed but one day the machine just turned off and wouldn't turn on again. I tried to power it up a few times over the following couple days but it was dead (yes it was plugged in). I packed it away for the winter and then tried it again 2 months ago, it worked. Since then the computer has crashed 3-4 times but i think these were caused when trying to play high bitrate 4k videos.

Anyways the computer has met it's demise again! If I press the power button after the power plug has been removed and reinserted, the computers lights (inside power button and another that streaks across the top (just for show)) will flash once for a split second (no bootscreen, fans, sound or harddrive). If i try again i get no response until the power cable is removed and reinserted.

 

I've spent some time googling about and it appears that the first piece of hardware to break is generally the PSU.. it appears mine is a 'CWT 450watt' whatever that is. I read somewhere that it's supposed to be pretty crap.

 

I'm basically at a point where i need to get this computer back up and running, but have very little cash and pc tools. I was thinking of buying a Corsair PSU on amazon for around £40-£50, i just need to know that it is a worthwhile risk to take.

 

Based on the symptons, what are the chances of this being a PSU related problem? Am i sniffing in the right direction? Is their a recommended budget PSU?

 

Thanks :)


Edited by ChargeTheBarger, 02 June 2014 - 11:31 AM.


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#2 GreenGiant117

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 11:50 AM

Sounds like its a good chance there is something bad in the power supply (PSU) I believe that it would be a worthy venture to buy a similar sized one and try swapping it out.

 

Just make sure that the motherboard connection matches (20 / 24 pin) and that there are enough connections for everything in your pc.

 

Everyone is going to suggest a different brand of supply, I have had good luck with Corsair myself in the past, so I generally suggest them, it probably wont be the cheapest but it should work for you.



#3 hamluis

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 11:53 AM

Before buying a PSU...my choice would be to simply remove one from another computer (friend, acquaintance, etc.) and install it in lieu of the current one.

 

The switch should not take more than 10 minutes or so.  If problems exist with different PSU (with no faults), the direction points to a different premise.

 

Louis



#4 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 12:00 PM

Thanks guys, does the flashing lights provide any indication to the PSU's status? To me it feels like the release of an electrical surge but just wondering if it'd be cut off all together if it had died.

 

Good to see some confirmation (somewhat) that it is/maybe a problem with the PSU!

 

hamlius, i'll have a look around for one.. good idea 



#5 Netghost56

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 12:33 PM

A flashing green light on the back of the PSU indicates a bad PSU. It should be steady green.

 

Usually I would assume a short, but the intermittent operation of the PSU sounds more like a bad cap to me.



#6 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 12:35 PM

I have an old computer with a 'Delta Electronics DPS-200pb-138 A 200w' PSU, is this safe to use?

 

EDIT: Netghost, i've never seen a light on the back.. i'll check now

 

EDIT 2: Nope no sign of any lights relating directly to the PSU. Also i've just noticed that the fans get a slight acceleration when the power burst occurs (It's likely this was happening along, must have missed it.) 


Edited by ChargeTheBarger, 02 June 2014 - 12:44 PM.


#7 hamluis

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 01:52 PM

I'll only say that systems of 10 years or so ago...many used 250-watt PSUs.  On the other hand, I would not try to run today's systems with such an inferior-by-today's-standards PSU as the one you mention.

 

Louis



#8 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 02:00 PM

I'll only say that systems of 10 years or so ago...many used 250-watt PSUs.  On the other hand, I would not try to run today's systems with such an inferior-by-today's-standards PSU as the one you mention.

 

Louis

I hear yah! 

Are you aware of any other free ways to test the psu or is that it?



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 02:32 PM

If you have a multimeter, you can test a PSU.

 

 


#10 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 03:26 PM

interesting vid john, i'll try and get one off a mate :)



#11 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 03:46 PM

I've just thought.. surely since the PSU's fan only spins slightly (and stops) when the power button is pressed, that means that it isn't producing power. Unless a spinning fan is not an indicator to a working PSU?


Edited by ChargeTheBarger, 02 June 2014 - 03:56 PM.


#12 Roodo

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 04:09 PM

Correct, a spinning fan is not an indicator.



#13 ChargeTheBarger

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 04:21 PM

Correct, a spinning fan is not an indicator.

ok cheers

 

I'm wondering if i were to buy a new PSU and it didn't turn out not to be the cause, what is the next likely piece of hardware to have been damaged? I have another motherboard and some ram. But not a CPU



#14 Netghost56

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 11:10 AM

As PSUs feed power directly to the motherboard, hard drive, and CD/DVD drives (and to some high-performance videocards) those would be the next affected components.

 

But since your CPU and RAM are connected directly to the motherboard, I usually start there first. Mobos are pretty sensitive to power surges- I've diaged and/or replaced more blown/shorted motherboards than hard drives, though I've replaced many more PSUs.






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